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If I'm Jewish and You're Christian, What Are the Kids?: A Parenting Guide for Interfaith Families Paperback – September 1, 1993


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If I'm Jewish and You're Christian, What Are the Kids?: A Parenting Guide for Interfaith Families + Raising Your Jewish/Christian Child: How Interfaith Parents Can Give Children the Best of Both Their Heritages (Newmarket Parenting Guide)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 145 pages
  • Publisher: Urj Press (September 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807404527
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807404522
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #750,060 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 43 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
My husband (Jewish) and I (Christian) were given this book as a gift. We both read it indiviually and both had the same reaction: It is written in a very biased way. The authors portray the Christian religion as superficial. Case studies are used throughout to make their point- you must choose Judaism if your children are to grow up with a firm sense of self and belonging. (Christianity as the chosen religion does not seem to be an option with the authors). I do not recommend this book and neither would my husband. We threw it out.
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27 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be very biased. I am Christian, my husband is Jewish and we are raising our children Jewish. If you are considering converting to the Jewish faith, then you'll find this book supportive and it might work for you. However, don't be misled into thinking it's a book for interfaith families. This book left me hurt, more confused and even a little angry. I do NOT recommend it.
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14 of 19 people found the following review helpful By R. L. Brooks on June 6, 2005
Format: Paperback
I purchased this book without reading the reviews and I regret that now! The book essentially tells the story of two interfaith families, and how they coped with the spiritual education of their children. One family opted to raise their children as Jews, the second choose to raise the children as both , which led to little or no religious based education. This was quite disheartening for me, as our plan is to both baptize our children, and have a traditional bris or naming ceremony. I wanted to learn how to teach my kids about God, Jesus, and the bible staying as true as possible to both Catholicism and Judaism . Understanding this is going to be quite a challenge I was putting a lot of hope into this volume. Unfortunately, this book offered no practical solutions, except to favor raising your kids as Jews. At no point did this text offer any solution on what to do if both parents are very strong in their faith and want to pass that on. I am disappointed that a book that asks a simple question never really answers it. At one point in the book, the daughter of the 'both' family indicates she is sorry she isn't anything. She 'resents she was raised without a real religion'. That is so sad, and this book never explains what to do to prevent the result.

Try a different source. This one will only frustrate you.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
While this book does a good job of pointing out the conflicts/issues/problems that interfaith couples will face when raising children, I found it definitely biased toward choosing one religion in the home, and making that religion Judaism. If you are looking for ways in which to incorporate two religions in a home--skip this book.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Heidi E. Holzkamper on May 12, 2000
Format: Paperback
Despite the "Do Not Buy" review, I did purchase this book almost by accident. While it did not offer any wonderful suggestions, it did start to ask the right questions. My boyfriend and I are beginning this journey of education, conversation and decision making and this did help formulate some questions. I did however find "The Interfaith Family Guidebook" VERY helpful and insightful! (also available here on amazon)
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Anyechka on August 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book was okay, though a bit superficial and not as in-depth as I would hope a book on this subject would be. I also didn't like how the two families were composites of many different families whom the author had interviewed, just for the sake of simplicity.

Apparently the truth contained in these pages, regardless of how it wasn't as in-depth as it could've been, offends people in interfaith marriages who want to raise their kids as "both" instead of picking just one religion. The two boys who were being raised Jewish seemed more secure and happy in their religious identity than the three kids who were being raised "both." Those kids felt more conflicted and angry, and confused over which religion they truly were a part of, which they ought to choose, why they weren't doing more in either religion, why they couldn't have just one religion like their cousins did. The oldest, Hannah, felt this especially keenly; she wanted a place to call home, comforting religious rituals that united the family instead of divided them, the type of religion she could turn to when the going got tough, instead of her parents trying to be two religions at once and in the process seriously dumbing down both. I wasn't raised in any religion, though my parents were both Christians, and I felt the same way she did; how come all of the other kids get religious holidays, memories, and coming of age ceremonies?

The librarian on duty when I checked this book out said she was in an interfaith marriage, and that she couldn't wait for me to return it so she could immediately check it out herself. The information in here may be more of a superficial overview than a real in-depth discussion, but it gets the point across well, as evidenced by how strongly some people feel over reading the advice to pick just one religion.
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