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Comment: 2003. Vg+ condition. Small remainder mark on bottom text-block edge; Contents bright, crisp & clean, appears unread; covers glossy w/ slightest bend to front cover from storage. 158 pp.
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Jews and Christians: The Myth of a Common Tradition Paperback – February 19, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 172 pages
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub; Reprint edition (February 19, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592441564
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592441563
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 6.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,967,185 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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About the Author

Jacob Neusner is Research Professor of Religion and Theology at Bard College. Dr. Neusner has published more than seven hundred fifty books and holds twenty honorary degrees and medals from academic institutions worldwide. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Richard Menninger on July 25, 2005
Format: Paperback
In a society where political correctness dominates our thinking, it is unusual for someone to speak to the contrary. But this is what Neusner, the prolific Jewish writer, does. He opens his preface with the thought that "... there is not now and there has never been a dialogue between the religions, Judaism and Christianity"(ix). In other words, Neusner believes that little, if any, progress has been accomplished over the past 2000 years toward bringing the two religions near anything that approaches mutual understanding. And in fairness, he does not place the blame on one religion over another for this present situation. Rather, he simply chalks it up to the way each religion is.

In Neusner's thinking neither Judaism nor Christianity has attempted to understand `the other.' Judaism is discovered in the Talmud (a culmination of the interpretation of the written Torah as joined to the oral Torah). This dual Torah differs greatly from Christianity and its Bible. This latter document begins with the Old Testament (as does Judaism) but finds its final interpretation in the New Testament. an explanation quite different than the Talmud. In fact, except for a brief period (300 CE-400 CE), the two religions really have different emphases. Before that period Judaism, as described in the Mishnah (200 CE), was not interested in a Messiah. With the rise to power of Constantine (312 CE), the two religions came in closer contact than before. But this deeper conversation came about simply because Christianity became the dominant religion of the Rome Empire. From Israel's' perspective, it had already been in contact with Rome since 63 BCE, and its main hope was to someday become the free people of God, not convert to or be converted by Christianity.
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