Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Jews in the Japanese Mind: The History and Uses of a Cultural Stereotype (Studies of Modern Japan) Expanded ed. Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0739101674
ISBN-10: 0739101676
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$9.41 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$27.95 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
25 New from $19.95 23 Used from $9.41
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Save Up to 90% on Textbooks Textbooks
$27.95 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Why are the Japanese so obsessed with Jews when there is no visible Jewish presence in Japan? How did anti-Semitism become so prominent a part of Japanese thought and anti-Semitic rhetoric so pervasive in the media? Goodman, a professor of Japanese literature, and Miyazawa, a history professor, have written an often surprising and consistently dismaying history of Japan's negative attitude toward Jews. Japanese anti-Semitism is based on the "persistent, chimerical belief in a global Jewish conspiracy bent on destroying Japan." Curiously, this paranoia is wedded to an odd fascination with the idea of common ancestry between Jews and the Japanese and an identification with the Jews of the Holocaust. Goodman and Miyazawa attempt to explain these seemingly opposite points of view by examining various influential and wildly popular Japanese anti-Semitic books and other texts. They begin with discussions of Japan's deeply entrenched xenophobia, periods of spiritual crisis, and carefully orchestrated nationalism, and then consider the aftermath of World War II and the economic surge that has left many middle-class Japanese overworked, angry, and eager for a scapegoat. Goodman and Miyazawa rate high praise for explicating this sickeningly familiar tale and defining its implications. Donna Seaman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

An enlightening and thorough examination of Japanese notions of the Jews. . . . Jews in the Japanese Mind is not a book about Jews. It is a book about being different, about not being Japanese, about the vast array of people with whom Japan still struggles to come to terms. (The New York Times)

This is a riveting study of one of the most surprising phenomena in the history of the Jews. Based on extensive and scrupulous scholarship, Goodman and Miyazawa have revealed how the mythological Jew can play a central role in a culture that has no Jews. This strange obsession reveals fascinating and often frightening dimensions of modern Japan. (David Biale, Center for Jewish Studies, Graduate Theological Union)

By studying antisemitism and its reverse, philosemitism, Goodman and Miyazawa show that Japanese ideas about Jews stem directly from Japan's modern cultural experience. This unique study is an absorbing essay on relativism and universalism in the contemporary life of the mind in Japan. (Tom Havens, University of California, Berkeley)

A serious, thoroughly researched scholarly work that not just explains the superficial side of Japan's bizarre fascination with "Jewish" themes, but presents a balanced historical survey of Japan's encounter with Judaism from the end of the Tokugawa period to the establishment of a Jewish Cultural Center in Tokyo [in 1994]. (The Instrumentalist)
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE



Product Details

  • Series: Studies of Modern Japan
  • Paperback: 422 pages
  • Publisher: Lexington Books; Expanded ed. edition (July 26, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0739101676
  • ISBN-13: 978-0739101674
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.9 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,835,778 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is a very erudite, readable, fair-minded treatment of an unfortunate topic by two fine scholars, one American and one Japanese. Goodman was a specialist in Japanese literature who headed a department at the University of Illinois. This book has been heartily endorsed by John Dower, probably the foremost scholar of modern Japanese history and winner of the Pulitzer prize for his book Embracing Defeat. No doubt some Japanese are not happy with its contents, since it exposes an embarrassing aspect of the Japanese intelligentsia. The facts are indeed disgraceful. Japanese pundits, politicians, journalists, religious leaders, and educators of all stripes have embraced and promoted fictitious, destructive ideas about Jews and Israel. Probably the political left in Japan has been the most guilty of this.

I have lived in Japan a long time, and I found this book very helpful in understanding why the mass media and people in Japan tend to be anti-Israel. My own students have been influenced by one of the people they mention in the book, a photojournalist named Ryuichi Hirokawa, who demonizes Israel and Jews in many of his works (I wrote an article about him on the American Thinker web site and mentioned this book in that context). A similar mentality pervades the world of higher education in Japan, which is the world that I work in. Reading Melanie Phillips's book The World Turned Upside Down, I discovered that many in Great Britain now suffer from similar deep-seated prejudice toward Israel and Jews. Let's hope Americans don't fall into the same slime pit. Books like this one can help, so I hope many Japanese will read it in its Japanese translation.
Comment 5 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Anyone who wants to understand history, or for that matter human nature, should read this book. Professor Goodman (whom I learned has recently passed away) goes over about 400 years of Japanese history and shows how the Jews have been both misunderstood, and sometimes sympathized with, by the Japanese people. Rather shocking in a way, and shows how important it is for those who know and care to speak up for what is right.
Comment 3 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Good overview of the Japanese perspective of Jews. A bit pedantic, though...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Avery on October 15, 2012
Format: Paperback
Do Jews exist outside of the Japanese mind? The author recommends, for an "unbiased" look at the "real" Jews, Joan Peters' book From Time Immemorial. That should give you a taste of what planet this book hails from. Obviously an author that believes in Peters' perspective is not going to give us a fair treatment of Japanese accounts of Judaism and the Jewish people. Rather, this book is viewing a lens through a lens, and unsurprisingly is frequently condescending or dismissive of the Japanese researchers he discusses. It is not for nothing that Japanese reviewers refer to this book as "tondemo-bon", that is to say, something like a ridiculous or nonsensical affair. It is a remarkably poor treatment of the subject it claims to be covering, so it cannot be recommended as an introductory text. However, I acknowledge with those reviewers that this book will serve as a half-decent reference for those already familiar with the subject of Japanese views of Judaism.

Instead of this book, please consider any of the far superior works such as Professor Ben-Ami Shillony's The Jews & the Japanese: The Successful Outsiders or Professor Jacob Kovalio's The Russian Protocols of Zion in Japan (Asian Thought and Culture).

edit: This review was originally two stars. I lowered it to one star after reading the source of Goodman's ridiculous interaction with Fumiko Kometani, who he caricatures on pages 241-244.
Read more ›
2 Comments 4 of 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Jews in the Japanese Mind: The History and Uses of a Cultural Stereotype (Studies of Modern Japan)
This item: Jews in the Japanese Mind: The History and Uses of a Cultural Stereotype (Studies of Modern Japan)
Price: $27.95
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: the zionist connection ii, alfred m. lilienthal