Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy New
$10.42
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $4.53 (30%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Jezebel (Vintage Internat... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Jezebel (Vintage International) Paperback – May 1, 2012

4.3 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.42
$3.00 $0.01

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$10.42 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Jezebel (Vintage International)
  • +
  • The Fires of Autumn (Vintage International)
  • +
  • The Wine of Solitude
Total price: $35.29
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for Irene Nemirovsky and Jezebel:
 
“Engrossing. . . . A fascinating portrait of paranoid self-absorption.”
Financial Times
 
“Fast-paced and highly dramatic, Jezebel offers a fascinating glimpse into an inter-war world of privilege, wealth and Darwinian social combat.”
New Statesman
 
“Nemirovsky wrote, for all to read at last, some of the greatest, most humane and inclusive fiction that conflict has produced.”
The New York Times Book Review
 
“Nemirovsky’s scope is like that of Tolstoy: She sees the fullness of humanity and its tenuous arrangements and manages to put them together with a tone that is affectionate, patient, and relentlessly honest.”
O, The Oprah Magazine
 
“Extraordinary. . . . Nemirovsky achieves her penetrating insights with Flaubertian objectivity.”
The Washington Post Book World
 
“Brilliant. . . . [Nemirovsky wrote] with supreme lucidity [and] expressed with great emotional precision her understanding of the country that betrayed her.”
The Nation
 
“Transcendent, astonishing. . . . Like Anne Frank, Irene Nemirovsky was unaware of neither her circumstance nor the growing probability that she might not survive. And still, she writes to us.”
The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

About the Author

Irene Nemirovsky was born in Kiev in 1903 into a wealthy banking family and immigrated to France during the Russian Revolution. After attending the Sorbonne in Paris, she began to write and swiftly achieved success with David Golder, which was followed by more than a dozen other books. Throughout her lifetime she published widely in French newspapers and literary journals. She died in Auschwitz in 1942. More than sixty years later, Suite Francaise was published posthumously for the first time in 2006.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Interested in the Audiobook Edition?
If you’re the author, publisher, or rights holder of this book, let ACX help you produce the audiobook.Learn more.

Product Details

  • Series: Vintage International
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (May 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307745465
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307745460
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #612,950 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Patto TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 9, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found this book somewhat painful to read, but good to think about afterwards. The story is set in the early twentieth century and goes through the Great War. The central character, Gladys Eysenach, is a vain and frivolous woman obsessed to the point of madness with staying forever young and desirable.

Gladys has the kind of beauty that lasts beyond middle age and attracts admirers at every turn. Her great wealth helps her support the illusion of endless youth. Her biggest problem is her daughter who, although obliging in most ways, persists in getting older every year. Gladys is too young to have a grown-up daughter!

I won't give any details of the plot, so you can experience the emotional shocks fresh. Jezebel is a tour de force, with its single-minded focus on the disturbing psychology of Gladys and her hedonistic world.

Jezebel was published in French in 1936 and in English in 1937.

Translator Sandra Smith gives us a telling fact in her short but informative introduction. Irene Nemirovsky's mother Fanny dressed her in children's clothes well into Irene's teens, as a way of denying her own age. We need look no further than Fanny to understand the power of this book to distress and horrify.

This is not comfort reading. Rather, it's fiercely thought-provoking - an all-out indictment of the cult of youth and beauty that we still suffer from today. If you're exploring all the works of Irene Nemirovsky, as I am, you'll want to include Jezebel.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Jezebel" is a great piece of pulp fiction. It would have made a great 1950s film starring Joan Crawford or Bette Davis. Like Horace McCoy's classic pulp fiction, "They Shoot Horses Don't They," it begins with a murder trial and then backtracks to show you just exactly why that trial had to take place. The story involves murder, blackmail, and plenty of sexual shenanigans. The title character (whose name is actually Gladys Eysenbach) is one of the great villainesses of 20th Century fiction, as self-centered and malicious as Mildred Pierce's daughter Vida. The book -- at least the English translation -- truly reads as if it had been written by James M. Cain. No matter what you might have thought of "Suite Francaise" (I thought it over-rated, a promising first draft of a novel that, tragically, was never allowed to ripen) you ought to try "Jezebel." Eerily, the novel prefigures the fate of Irene Nemirovsky's daughters who, after their parents died at Auschwitz, were turned away by Nemirovsky's own mother, who chose to send them to an orphanage rather than acknowledge to the world that she was old enough to be a grandmother. "Jezebel" and another Nemirovsky novel ("David Golder") both draw on Nemirovsky's own relationship with her monstrous mother. When that monster died, it was discovered that she had only two items in the safe in her apartment: a copy of "David Golder" and a copy of "Jezebel" -- proving that life can sometimes be as heavy-handed as the most lurid of pulp fictions.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What a pleasure it is to read Nemirovsky's work. This novel surprised me greatly because of the magnificent twist at the novel's conclusion. The long "prologue" beginning sets the stage for a surprising revelation and unfolds slowly as the narrative continues. She writes about beauty, aging and social pressure for women to maintain their looks. Her protagonist, Gladys, is perhaps the most self-centered, hedonistic character in modern literature and reading her story is like watching a train go off the rails. She's not likable in the least, yet somehow I fell in love with her story and Nemirovsky's masterful way of presenting this tale of narcissism gone bad. The prose is beautiful but not bloated with description and the author takes the time to fully explore Gladys' inner psyche. Highly recommended literature.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This French novel from the mid-1930s [newly translated in 2010] is one of Irène Némirovsky’s (IN) attempts to cope in writing with her horrible mother. No reference to Jewish or Russian roots in this work. Instead, she describes mother Gladys as the Girl with the Red Shoes, feasting and dancing until daybreak, going to wherever the other rich congregate: she is an immensely rich heiress with a maturing daughter and very, very beautiful. Her sole purpose in life is to be adored and outshine other women, to be seductive and be seduced. But from early on, Gladys is consumed by deep fears of aging and how then, her only way to enjoy life will come to a halt.
As years, even decades pass, her physique hardly changes, but her anxiety grows exponentially. What she does to prolong the perception of her youth is the gist of the novel. It is all about manipulation and destruction, beginning in the 1910s and ending in 1935.
The book starts with her trial that year, charged with shooting dead her 20-year old lover...

Very intriguing novel in this day and age about the French leisure class in the 1930s, their mistresses & gigolos, heavy drinking & gambling and endless parties and balls. Male readers will hate it. But IN, who published a dozen novels before and during WW II. Here she acts as a crafty plotter imploring readers to jerk tears on Gladys' behalf, which no one will do, of course.
Fans of IN know the real fate of this fictionalized mother and daughter drama. The Girl with the Red Shoes died in her nineties or aged 102 (sources disagree) in Nice, France where she also had a comfortable war. Her book author-daughter IN was murdered in Auschwitz in 1942, aged 39. After the war, “Gladys” curtly refused to take care of IN’s two small daughters. They survived WW II in occupied France lugging along a small suitcase full of IN manuscripts and drafts of another 8 novels, including IN's unfinished masterpiece “Suite Française”.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Jezebel (Vintage International)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: Jezebel (Vintage International)