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Jim Blinn's Corner: Dirty Pixels (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Graphics) Paperback – May 15, 1998

ISBN-13: 978-1558604551 ISBN-10: 1558604553 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Graphics
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann; 1 edition (May 15, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1558604553
  • ISBN-13: 978-1558604551
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 7.3 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #638,320 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

"All problems in computer graphics can be solved with a matrix inversion."-Jim Blinn
Jim Blinn is Back!
Dirty Pixels is Jim's second compendium of articles selected from his award-winning column, "Jim Blinn's Corner," in IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. Here he addresses topics in image processing and pixel arithmetic and shares the tricks he's uncovered through years of experimentation.
Writing in the inimitable, engaging style for which he's famous, Jim's easy-to-understadn explanations and solutions make abstract concepts accessible to a broad audience. Dirty Pixels is an invaluable resource for anyone in the computer graphics field.
Teapots and More
Jim's contributions to computer graphics include the Voyager Fly-by animations of space missions to Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus; The Mechanical Universe, a 52-part telecourse of animated physics; and the computer animation of Carl Sagan's PBS series Cosmos. Jim developed many graphics techniques now in widespread use, among them bump mapping, environment mapping, and blobby modeling.

About the Author

For over three decades, eminent computer graphicist Jim Blinn has coupled his scientific knowledge and artistic abilities to foster the growth of the computer graphics field. His many contributions include the Voyager flyby animations of space missions to Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus; The Mechanical Universe, a 52-part telecourse of animated physics; and the computer animation of Carl Sagan's PBS series Cosmos. In addition, Blinn is the recipient of the SIGGRAPH Computer Graphics Achievement Award as well as the SIGGRAPH Coons Award, and has developed many widely used graphics techniques, including bump mapping, environment mapping, and blobby modeling. In 2000, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. He currently works at Microsoft Research.


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Customer Reviews

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 6, 1998
Format: Paperback
This volume covers the 2D end of the graphics making process - the proper treatment of pixels. Included, amongst others, is some signal processing tutorial, an examination of dithering, a look at the niceties of compositing. Each snack-sized piece is practical, but also attentive of the math and theoretical issues - a balance which Jim Blinn sets the standard for. This all means that if you write graphics software you can learn some neat things from this book that aren't available elsewhere.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 17, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an absolutely wonderful book. Readable, yet technical; quite funny in places, yet to the point; insightful, but no incomprehensible "head in the clouds" academic rambling (he rambles a bit, entertainingly and technically, but he explains everything so it's a pleasant experience instead of the deadly difficult reading some of the common graphics texts provide.)
There are also some biographical interludes that aren't graphics, strictly speaking, but I found them eminently worth reading. Even if you don't, though, they only represent a very small fraction of the book and you can discount or skip them entirely without loss of technical detail, as they are in their own little isolated portions of the text.
The book itself is a series of separate (but often related) ruminations on various subjects of a graphic nature; the only problem the book has is that it ended way too soon for me.
I was entertained, enlightened, and I went *straight* to our source code and improved a number of things within hours of understanding what Blinn was telling me in more than one place. With immediate and MOST satisfying results, I can add.
:-)
The only problem this book can possibly said to have is that there are many areas of graphics, an admittedly very wide field, that Blinn says nothing about - and after seeing what he has to say on what he *does* talk about, one can only be left with a sense of loss that he doesn't (for example) write about textures here, or perhaps pick apart a few more taken for granted areas, which he does several times in this volume to great effect.
If you write graphics code, you should own this. Buy it now. NOW!
What are you doing still reading? BUY IT NOW!
No, I don't know the guy, and I get no commission or other compensation.
:-)
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By calvinnme HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 11, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is the second book in Jim Blinn's "Corner" series, and it has some good information in it, but I didn't think it was quite up to par with his first book. There are 3 articles on digital video issues that are essentially no longer relevant. Plus, the author has a couple of articles that basically act as memoirs of technical events in the distant past so that due to changes in technology, they are also of limited usefulness.

Like the first book, it is not intended to be a computer graphics textbook. It is simply a set of articles that the author has written over the years, mainly from the late 80's to the mid 90's, on computer graphics topics. The author offers up mathematics as it is needed and pseudocode. I review the book by individual article:

Chapter 1 The World's Largest Easter Egg and What Came Out of It

The use of an interesting triangulation scheme to design a monumental sculpture of an easter egg is described. The triangulation method used to approximate the egg's surface is based on paper folding. The development of the program and its generalization to three dimensions are examined. The calculation of the three parts of the egg (a middle-barrel section and the two end caps) and some unsolved questions regarding this technique are discussed.

Chapter 2 What We Need Around Here Is More Aliasing

A brief tutorial is given on what aliasing means. Plots of some relevant functions are shown. Some of the conventional wisdom about aliasing and why that wisdom may not be so wise is explained. Aliasing is actually an image processing phenomenon involving the Fourier transform, convolution and the convolution theorem.
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