Joćo Voz E Violćo

June 13, 2000 | Format: MP3

$4.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:55
30
2
2:56
30
3
3:04
30
4
2:56
30
5
3:27
30
6
2:34
30
7
2:09
30
8
2:29
30
9
3:15
30
10
3:26

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: February 28, 2000
  • Release Date: February 28, 2000
  • Label: Verve Records
  • Copyright: (C) 1999 Universal Music Ltda
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 30:11
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000V657M4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #38,959 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Perfect songs, perfect voice, simply perfection.
Jim
The sound could have been much better on this album, though; the bass sounds somewhat muddy.
Idiosyncrat
It's also great to hear him singing the Caetano Veloso songs on this CD.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on June 15, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Antonio Carlos Jobim is probably the most recognizable bossa nova figure, but without Joćo Gilberto, there would be no bossa nova (as had been said by the late Jobim himself). Gilberto was the one who originated the guitar rhythm, and used the laid-back vocals. This new CD is just what the title says--voice and guitar. I have heard complaints about the CD: it barely totals 30 minutes, there are only 4 songs that he hasn't recorded before, and his voice and presentation are a little too laid-back, almost weak. But if you're a big bossa nova fan, I can't see any reason not to add this to your collection--Joćo is still the voice of bossa nova music. It's also great to hear him singing the Caetano Veloso songs on this CD.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Harding VINE VOICE on July 26, 2000
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I haven't heard anything new in a long time from Joao Gilberto and so am delighted that he has released this selection of Bossa Nova standards featuring just his voice and guitar. Thirty-five years have passed since the heyday of the genre and Gilberto's voice is just as it ever was. I had to laugh when I read one review that said it sounded cool in Portuguese but lyrically banal when translated into English. Well, this is Brazilian pop, and most pop music in any language tends not to be deep. But compare this pop with its contemporary American counterpart and I'll take the Brazilian every time. Joao is smooth, relaxed, and soothing here and thus is the perfect thing to listen to while sitting on your patio with your morning coffee watching the sun come up. My favorite cuts are Voce Vai Ver, Chega de Saudade, and the all-time classic Desafinado. If you are a Bossa Nova fan, this album deserves a place in your collection. The CD may be short, but it sure is sweet.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By E. Barteldes on October 29, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Music, as all other arts, has creators, imitators and developers. Of the second category there is little to say; they basically jump the wagon and profit whatever they can from the creator, while the developer tries his best to make the original creation grow further. In Brazil, samba had been around for ages, but it took the genius of Bahia-born Joćo Gilberto to develop the local beat and blend it with elements of cool jazz, thus creating a whole new style, Bossa Nova, which swept the planet during the late fifties and early sixties, and still influences a great number of musicians, from Charlie Byrd and Stan Getz in their time to George Michael and Tuck & Patty nowadays.
Pray silence now, for the man who created the whole thing, with the support of Antonio Carlos Jobim (who ,against his own will took the credit for himself), Vinicius de Morais and others has just released a new studio album, eight years after 1992's "Joćo" and three after the live "Eu Sei Que Vou Te Amar" (all titles, are, by the way, available in the U.S.). And this time, alas, he plays by himself. Just the man, his guitar and his voice, and no audience sounds.
The album, properly titled "Joao Voz e Violao (Joao, Voice and Guitar )opens with Caetano Veloso-penned "Desde Que O Samba É Samba" (Ever Since Samba Was Samba). Veloso,also a son of Bahia, wrote the song in 1993 as a tribute to samba and Bossa-Nova. In Joćo Gilberto's voice, the the lyric is taken to a whole new dimension:
A tristeza é senhora/ Desde que o samba é samba é assim/ A lágrima clara sobre a pele escura A chuva fria que cai lá fora Solidćo apavora Tudo demorando em ser tćo ruim Mas há uma coisa no tanto agora em mim Cantando mando a tristeza embora...
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By rash67 VINE VOICE on July 15, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Joao Gilberto, Stan Getz, Tom Jobim, and Astrud Gilberto et. al. created the blockbuster Verve album "Getz/Gilberto", the second largest selling Jazz Album of all time. It popularized Bossa Nova/ Samba, and stayed on top of the rock,pop AND jazz charts for months in '64.
Of the talented principals, only Joao is still with us, Stan and Tom are gone.
In this CD, he recaptures the inner peace and intimacy which I first heard on "Getz/Gilberto". If you could listen to "Getz /Gilberto" and listen only to Joao, this would be that record. "Joao Voz e Viola" is solo, just guitar and voice, as the name implies, without the other parts.
I almost prefer to listen to the melifluous Portuguese and imagine what the words might mean without reading the translation (which sort of renders the tunes more banal and less ethereal) but that's a very minor criticism.
Joao speaks to us from his heart, deep within a place of inner serenity, and sometimes wistful sadness. After a long stressful day, put on Joao and let him take away your cares. Listen with your lover.
4 & 1/2 stars = a great recording and a great performance, finally available at a good price. This could get 5 stars if more people could hear it!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Paul Richter on August 29, 2000
Format: Audio CD
If there's one thing you can say about Joao Gilberto, it's that he has a style, an original and distinctive one, and he sticks with it. Four decades after he launched bossa nova with his recordings of "Chega de Saudade" and "Desafinado", he can re-record them, and the only difference is the age in his voice.
And he somehow gets away with it. Or people let him get away with it.
If you're familiar with those original classics or even his later works, "Voz e Violao" will unfortunately sound like the same old stuff, perhaps even -- do I dare say it? -- a tired rehash of his material. At times he seems to plod his way through the songs, singing the lyrics twice through for lack of anything better to do, while at the same time sounding rushed as if to end the recording session as quickly as possible. (And at little more than thirty minutes total playing time, he seems to have succeeded there.)
On the other hand, these very same things give his performances an edgy feel that's interesting at times. Gilberto's style of "pulling the song one way and the guitar the other", as Tom Jobim described it, is nearly at the breaking point, with voice and guitar seemingly leapfrogging each other at times. And while some musicians would give up on a song when they can no longer reach the high notes, on "Voce Vai Ver" Gilberto just jumps down an octave in the middle of a phrase, twisting the melody in a new way.
For material, he chooses three Jobim standards, two Caetano Veloso favorites, a Gilberto Gil song, and a handful of others.
For the bossa nova fan, any release by Joao is a must, and I'll never tire of his singing "Chega de Saudade", whether it's the 1958 version or the 1999 version.
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