Buy Used
$11.99
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Zoverstocks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: All Discs are inspected and guaranteed. All dispatched with 1 - 3 working days from the UK
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Joachim, Sarasate, Ysaÿe
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Joachim, Sarasate, Ysaÿe


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, January 21, 1993
"Please retry"
$73.49 $11.99

1. Partitia In B Minor: Bouree
2. Sonata in G minor: Adagio
3. Romance In C Major
4. Hungarian Dance No. 1 In G Minor
5. Hungarian Dance No. 2 In D Minor
6. Zigeunerweisen, Op.20 No.1
7. Capricio Vasco
8. Capricio Jota
9. Tarantella
10. Miramar (Zortzico)
11. Habanera
12. Zapateado
13. Nocturne In E Flat Op. 9 - 2
14. Partita In E Major: Prelude
15. 'Pieces Pittoresque': Scherzo-Valse
16. Berceuse Op. 16
17. Concerto In E Minor Op. 64: Finale - Allegro molto
18. Two Mazurkas
19. Hungarian Dance No. 5 In G Minor

Product Details

  • Performer: Camille de Creus
  • Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach, Joseph Joachim, Johannes Brahms, Pablo de Sarasate, Frederic Chopin, et al.
  • Audio CD (January 21, 1993)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Pearl
  • ASIN: B000000WZ2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #649,316 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Joachim/Sarasate/Ysaye Store

Visit Amazon's Joachim/Sarasate/Ysaye Store
for all the music, discussions, and more.

Customer Reviews

This is the most important recording ever!
hollas
You really get to see how the playing styles changed from the early 1900s to now.
Sam
The tempo is insane, Sarasate must have had incredibly powerful arms at his age.
rufe

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 7, 2001
Format: Audio CD
A difficult, but highly musically rewarding album. Acoustic lateral-cut recordings made before about 1907-08 are extremely difficult to listen to unless the auditor adjusts to the distinctive colors, limitations, and mechanical interferences (notably surface noise) of the process. It is also helpful to realize that the violin was one of the most problematic instruments to record by the acoustic process, due to the violin's largely non-directional method of sound emission; instruments with a pointable sound aperture (most wind instruments, for example) recorded better becuse you could direct the sound straight into the recording horn. Assuming these conceptual hurdles are cleared, we have a document of three distinctive nineteenth-century musicians playing in styles so divergent from "modern" practice as to require twenty-first century auditors to develop completely different standards of assessment in order to appreciate what they hear. Truly, these recordings are a sonic glimpse into another world. The most problematic, both for current listeners and for his own contemporaries, is Joachim. He is also the oldest violinist of the three at the time of his recordings (72), and critics had had questions about certain elements of his playing style for many years before--most notably, his intonation, which was odd enough to provoke a spirited defense of it by George Bernard Shaw, a man who rarely defended ANY musician he reviewed. Also, his almost complete lack of vibrato is decidedly unsettling unless you realize that vibrato was regarded as an expressive device rather than a necessity until 1900, and Joachim had been concertizing since the 1840s.Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By "orpington" on October 22, 2001
Format: Audio CD
They key to appreciating the importance of this recording is to not try to listen to it through 21st century ears but through 19th century ears. This performance is remarkable in how it gives a key to the past AND guidance for the future of classical music. Really.
See Peter Gutmann's most-excellent review of Joachim's performance of Brahm's Hungarian Dance #2(...)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By hollas on November 16, 2003
Format: Audio CD
This is the most important recording ever! It is true that they are not perfect but even today with all the millions of cuts there are 2 or 3 notes on every recording that aren't good. Joachim plays Bach with a wisdom that is far beyond almost anybody playing today. Sarasate is now probably my favourite violinist. He has a style, grace, and elegance that is so personal that it captures the very essence of the 19th century. I say throw away your perfect intonation, your big sound, your wide vibrato. The most interesting thing about this style is the way that they don't "romanticize" the phrases nearly as much as today, giving the pieces a better overall conception. You don't remember something really special but rather the general impression. I have heard many violinists speak fondly of "the old guys" but never does it translate into the actual playing. Put on your 19th century ears. Let's throw out perfection for a more raw personal way of music making.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sam on June 8, 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is probably the most valuable recording ever made in history of the violin (unless there's a recording of Paganini out there, which I'm only fantasizing about). You really get to see how the playing styles changed from the early 1900s to now.

Joachim, to me, was the hardest to get used to. His own composition, Romance in C Major, and Hungarian Dances Nos. 1 and 2 were just amazing; beautifully played. However, his Bach was very different than what I had expected. His Bourree was alright; it was listen-able, but his Bach Sonata in G minor: I. Adagio was disappointing. I'm very lenient and at the same time picky on Bach. I know that people have their own interpretations of Bach, and I respect that, but I only give consent to Nathan Milstein and Henryk Szeryng's recording of Bach. Maybe Heifetz as an alternative. Joachim twisted around the rhythms and there was a thrust in the bow in the very first chord, unlike the type you can do in the Bach Chaconne. But when I listened to it many times, the Bach wasn't so bad. It was actually quite genius in the sense that back then, many people played Bach quite differently. What amazed me the most about Joachim was that both the Hungarian Dances were played with AMAZING speed and near perfection, and he was at the age of 72 when he recorded this.

Sarasate, the one I find most valuable in this album, recorded many of his own compositions and some other ones. From his Zigeunerweisen to Habanera and others, they were all played amazingly. Sarasate probably had arms of steel and extremely swift fingers at the tempo he was playing everything. Sarasate skips many of the introductions, such as the introductions in Introduction & Tarantelle and Caprice Basque (or Vasco).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in