Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Joan of Arc: A Spiritual Biography (Lives & Legacies) Hardcover – Bargain Price, December 1, 1999


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Bargain Price, December 1, 1999
$14.36 $2.45

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details


Special Offers and Product Promotions


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Life with Harper Lee
Invited to live as her neighbor, Marja Mills offer unprecedented insight into the reclusive author's life in The Mockingbird Next Door. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Lives & Legacies
  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: The Crossroad Publishing Company (December 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0824523504
  • ASIN: B003V1WF6C
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,337,638 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Siobhan Nash-Marshall has doctorates in Philosophy from Fordham University and Universita de Milano. She is currently an assistant professor at Fordham and New York University. Internationally acclaimed in the areas of metaphysics and epistemology Nash-Marshall engages the enigmatic figure of Joan and her contemporaries in the pursuit of the spiritual meaning of nationhood, and of personal quests.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

May 30, 1431:

The ordeal was finally coming to an end. After a year of imprisonment, a four-month trial, an abjuration and a counter-abjuration, Joan of Arc was to be burnt at the stake. The Vieux March, the old market place, at Rouen was swarming with people. It was the second time in less than a week that a crowd had gathered to see her, and everyone there knew that there could be no third: a relapsed "heretic" could know no end other than death.

Escorted by what eyewitnesses claim were some 800 soldiers armed with axes and swords, the death cart bearing Joan rolled into the square where there was an enormous scaffold with a massive plaster stake bearing the sign: "Joan called the Virgin, liar, pernicious, seducer of the people, diviner, superstitious, blasphemer of God, defamer of the faith of Jesus Christ, braggart, idolatrous, cruel, dissolute, invoker of devils, apostate, schismatic, and heretic." Wood had already been piled around the stake.

Three other wooden platforms loomed above the square. Waiting for her on the first one, which, it seems, was lavishly decorated with tapestries, were her accusers: the members of the ecclesiastical court which was about to excommunicate her. The bailiff of Rouen and his entourage - the secular authorities, who were called upon to sentence Joan to death and carry out the execution - were on the second platform. It was adjacent to the first. Nicholas Midi of the University of Paris, who was one of the court assessors, stood on the third platform. It was somewhat removed from the first two platforms and askew with respect to them.

What ensued was the slow and meticulous dance of public death.

Joan was made to dismount from the cart, climb up the steps of the third platform, and join Midi. When she had taken her proper place, the once Rector of the Parisian University plunged into a sermon on the iniquities and infectious nature of heresy. "When one member suffers," he began, "All suffer with it."

Ten thousand pairs of eyes were glued to his platform, caught, one imagines, in the unfolding of the ritual rather than in the content of the sermon per se. One pair of eyes paid careful attention to his words. They were those of Pierre Cauchon, the bishop of Beauvais and Chief Inquisitor at Joan's trial, who sat on the ecclesiastical platform. He was waiting for his cue. Cauchon was patient that day. He had to be. Midi was a long-winded academic, who was determined to put up a particularly powerful performance for the occasion. He spoke for a full hour.

But Cauchon could afford to be patient on that day. He had won his war. And as most winners would, he probably enjoyed the fact that his victory celebration was long. Cauchon was a vain man. As the "distinguished doctor" finally drew his sermon to a close, he slowly rose. It was nine o'clock, and his turn had come.

All eyes shifted to the Inquisitor, who in turn looked over at Joan and read her sentence: "like a dog that returns to its vomit" Joan had relapsed, she had returned to her heretical ways. He therefore excommunicated her - "cut [her] off like a leprous limb from the Church" - and handed her over to the secular authorities, who would deal with her as they saw fit. He "hoped they would be merciful."

Cauchon did not really mean it. The phrase was customary: it was just one of the many steps in the dance. Everyone there knew how secular authorities dealt with excommunicated heretics: they sentenced them to death at the stake.

On the platform opposite Cauchon's, Midi then turned to Joan and repeated the conclusion of Cauchon's sentence. "Go in peace," he told her, "The Church can no longer protect you and delivers you up to the secular arm." This was the cue for the men waiting on the last platform: the secular authorities. The bailiff of Rouen stood up and called upon two sergeants to seize Joan, accompany her down the steps, and over to him.

Joan was dragged through the jeering crowd over to the bailiff's platform and stood in front of the bailiff for some time awaiting her sentence. But the bailiff had somehow forgotten his lines. He delivered no official death sentence. After some discussion, he finally raised his hand, called out his orders - "Take her away! Take her away!" - and had her hastily, too hastily, escorted on to the scaffold, and up to the executioner.

At that point the ecclesiastical authorities rose and began to depart from the scene: the matter was officially out of their hands.

Once Joan had climbed the stairs of the scaffold, the executioner removed the white sorceress's bonnet, which it is said she was made to wear up to that time - one can never be too sure with 'witches' - and replaced it with a tall paper cap, which read: "heretic, relapsed, apostate, idolatress." He then hoisted her up to the massive plaster stake, chained her to it, and lit the wood.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 15 customer reviews
It is intelligent, entertaining and easy to read.
L P Dailey
The coherence between her convictions and actions will jolt anyone who faces the temptation to compromise on ideals, i.e., every living human person.
Maria A. Varela
Congratulations, and thank you, Ms. Nash-Marshall.
sofia giacomelli

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Maria A. Varela on December 5, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Written in a straight-forward, concise, and at times humorous manner, Nash-Marsha'lls Joan of Arc acquaints the reader with a historical character who became a legend during her lifetime legend.
Joan is presented to us as a brave young girl who received a mission and who courageously used all of her faculties and gifts to accomplish it.
Nash Marshall's approach is refreshingly honest. The narrative is centered on Joan, her mission, her work to fulfill it, her betrayal. The author gives us the facts and allows us readers to draw our own conclusions. So much has been written on Joan of Arc, by persons with all kinds of agendas. Feminists, anti-church militants and a host of others have told their stories and put Joan in as an illustration of the point they wanted to make. These interpretations vary widely, and it is amazing that they purport to deal with the same central character: Joan.
One of Joan's features the author shows us very successfully is the consistency of her life. The coherence between her convictions and actions will jolt anyone who faces the temptation to compromise on ideals, i.e., every living human person.
Lovers of history will find the author's thesis on the connection between the resurgence of France, the betrayal of Joan and the fall of Byzantium very interesting.
Those who read the book will learn a good deal about France and England in Joan's times. It can be enjoyed by a wide audience: adults and even mature high school student will find it interesting.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 12, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I have read just about every book out there on Joan of Arc and this is by far the best, at least in terms of a book for the popular reader, and it's about time. Marshall's book is a succinct, intelligent, and lively read, mixed with a sharp wit and punchy sensibility. (This from an academic noless.)And if you're looking for an exhaustive and thoroughly academic study of Joan, then any of Pernoud's books you'll want to pick up. But if you're looking for a good and thorough book on Joan for the general reader, and one that cuts through all the ridiculous (but fascinating nonetheless) mythologizing and romanticizing of her, and which offers a fresh and realistic point of view, then you'll definitely want to buy this book. Marshall knows how to cut to the chase but without diminishing any of the excitment or extraordinariness of Joan's remarkable story and short life. A must read for anyone interested in Joan of Arc. And, unusually, I might add, a read that should be of interest not just to the general reader, but even those esoteric "highbrows."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 19, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book reveals both the known real facts about Joan of Arc and the great spirituality of this still partially unknown woman. It was a period of war and battles and the book helps you understand that the most important thing about Joan of Arc is not her being able to successfully fighting against English soldiers and captains, but her being able to force the birthing of a new nation. The book leads you into the spirituality of Joan of Arc with an easy-to-follow trip into her being, faith and doubts. Really an excellent book, very well written and that you will surely get on reading to the end once you have started it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By sofia giacomelli on March 3, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Finally,a story teller opf depth...one whose clarity and understanding are the equal of her poetry. Certainly the entertaiment value of Ms Nash Marshall's "Spiritual Biography" of Joan of Arc will have its place,and won't leave anything of the bitter after taste of one who spends his time passing his time... but the life and case of Maid Joan, as told here, brings us something lasting. The author reveasls the master hand of the historian as she tells of the times and situation of the pulcelle of Domremy. Her tale leaves us with an exquisite background to our own age... how much more easily is the utopianism of our days to be seen as the dismal failure that it is... as well as the catastrophic attempts of the collectivists, with their socialism and communism and whatever... in the light of the idea brought to us today by a 17 years old farmer girl who knew, similarly in an age of little faith, that her nation might have a sacred cause, if it would only accept it, and be able to live the human, the holy life by it.
We live without the light of a maid who believed and was sure of the fact.
Congratulations, and thank you, Ms. Nash-Marshall. Our world, we hope, will be a less vague and frightening place for your recalling the work of Joan.
Sonia, Gaia & Sophie
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Maria A. Varela on December 5, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Written in a straight-forward, concise, and at times humorous manner, Nash-Marsha'lls Joan of Arc acquaints the reader with a historical character who became a legend during her lifetime legend.
Joan is presented to us as a brave young girl who received a mission and who courageously used all of her faculties and gifts to accomplish it.
Nash Marshall's approach is refreshingly honest. The narrative is centered on Joan, her mission, her work to fulfill it, her betrayal. The author gives us the facts and allows us readers to draw our own conclusions. So much has been written on Joan of Arc, by persons with all kinds of agendas. Feminists, anti-church militants and a host of others have told their stories and put Joan in as an illustration of the point they wanted to make. These interpretations vary widely, and it is amazing that they purport to deal with the same central character: Joan.
One of Joan's features the author shows us very successfully is the consistency of her life. The coherence between her convictions and actions will jolt anyone who faces the temptation to compromise on ideals, i.e., every living human person.
Lovers of history will find the author's thesis on the connection between the resurgence of France, the betrayal of Joan and the fall of Byzantium original yet totally plausible.
Those who read the book will learn a good deal about France and England in Joan's times. It can be enjoyed by a wide audience: adults and even mature high school student will find it of interest.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?