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Job Hunting After 50 Paperback – February 7, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning PTR; 1 edition (February 7, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1435459091
  • ISBN-13: 978-1435459090
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 7 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #374,987 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Introduction: Is There a Job After 50? 1. What Skills and Qualifications Set You Apart? 2. Resumes and Employment Letters. 3. Using Technology to Find Employment. 4. Networking. 5. Attitude, Energy, and Dressing for Success. 6. Mistakes Job Seekers Over 50 Make. 7. Where is the Demand for Over 50 Employees? 8. Create a Success Plan.

About the Author

Carol Silvis is the author of 101 Ways to Connect with Customers, Chiefs, and Co-Workers, Job Hunting After 50, 101 Ways to Make Yourself Indispensable at Work, and college textbooks 100% Externship Success and General Office Procedures. Other publications include "Time Management and Organization for Writers" (2012 Writers Market), a dozen creative non-fiction stories and inspirational pieces published in national magazines, and over 40 articles published in various newsletters. Ms. Silvis has a master's degree in education and has trained adults in how to get a job, keep and enjoy it, and advance on the job. She teaches part time at Penn State's New Kensington campus and leads workshops and seminars for schools, businesses, professional organizations, and libraries on job hunting, resume preparation, customer service, stress management, telephone techniques, human relations/teamwork, communication, writing, and time management/organization. She is the president of Pennwriters, a 400+- member writing group. She won the 2008 Meritorious Service Award, was past VP and Authors' Advocate, and was the 2005 and 2007 Conference Coordinator.

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Customer Reviews

Very useful, matter-of-fact advice.
Happy Reader
Companies routinely treat their employees like disposable income--when things get tight they just cut them off as if they are little more than a luxury item.
Wayne Klein
In fact, the word "I" does not appear at all in the book.
Michael Lichter

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Knits in Tardis VINE VOICE on April 21, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
At it's core, "Job Hunting After 50" sends a decidedly discouraging message. On the one hand, the author stresses (repeatedly) how critical it is for the older job seeker to keep a positive attitude; on the other, referencing the admittedly sorry state of 2011's job market, she persistently suggests job seekers lower their expectations, particularly salary expectations.

Certainly, there's no getting around the fact that a lot of U.S. workers are having to make tough decisions, including accepting lower wages, but a job search manual should have more to offer than a resigned "accept less". (How about some strategies for not bidding down one's own starting salary? A discouraged worker is just as much at risk of undercutting their own chances there than of holding out for an unrealistic amount.) And that's just the start of where this book falls short.

For the post-50 job seeker, some of whom haven't been in the position of being "between jobs" frequently, if ever, there's a potential minefield of job scams out there, as well as considerations such as "is that health care plan with the new job (if it exists) sufficient to cover anything more than basic preventative?", or "will that temp-to-perm job actually go perm?" (the ranks of the permanently temp-status are growing), or even "will I have to consider relocation to stay in my profession?"

These questions are all beyond the scope of this book, and some of them really shouldn't be. One sadly proliferating industry is that of pseudo headhunter/job coaches who purport to take on unemployed professionals as "clients", for a fee, but actually offer the barest of "motivational" services, maybe going to far as to mail around a client's resume.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Michael Lichter VINE VOICE on April 4, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
If you're over 50 (like me) and looking for a job (like me) and you're either having a difficult time finding something suitable or are worried that your age might be a problem, you could consider turning to Carol Silvis' "Job Hunting After 50" for assistance and advice. My advice is: don't.

Before I explain my reasons, let's start with an overview of what the book holds: Most of it consists of generic job search tips and guidelines: how to identify your skills and job-relevant personal characteristics (Ch. 1), what to put in resumes and cover letters (Ch. 2), how to use the web to search for job openings and investigate employers (Ch. 3), how to enlarge your personal network (Ch. 4), how to present yourself in an employment interview (Ch. 5), how to identify the most promising industries and occupations (Ch. 7), and how to organize and document your search (Ch. 8). Although only one chapter is devoted solely to the problems of older job seekers-- "Mistakes Job Seekers Over 50 Make" (Ch. 6)--all of the chapters feature tips and advice specifically for older workers; e.g., the chapter on conducting an online job search identifies sites that cater to the over-50 crowd, and the chapter on resume writing highlights recent changes in what employers expect to see in resumes.

That overview may sound promising to you, but here's the rub: it's not done very well.

How so? First, this is the most negative and discouraging job search/career guidance book I've ever seen -- and I've read several and skimmed a number of others. The book focuses throughout on older workers' "shortcomings" (p. 20) and "mistakes" (Ch. 6).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By eric talerico VINE VOICE on October 24, 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book could easily be retitled "Job Hunting". The target audiences being over fifty job hunters, you'd expect a bit more specific information, but if you've ever read and implemented the info in a career path book before, you won't need or want this one. Its not a bad book, but it really doesn't have anything to differentiate it from the myriad of others out there.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Cat Feet on July 2, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I believe this book may be of interest for someone who hasn't sought out a new job for 10-20 years. The landscape of job hunting has certainly changed over the years, and may be an extreme challenge for someone who has been in their position or industry for many years. This seems to be the "premise" behind Job Hunting After 50. If you find hints like this helpful, this book is for you:

* Get an email address and use the internet
* Network (yawn!)
* Spruce up your appearance (don't "look old, you fuddy duddy!)
* "Look" like you're energetic & eager (that you can "handle" the job)
* Etc.....nothing new!

The author makes the assumption that someone over 50 equals an old, tired, worn out person that needs to give a different impression to potential employers. She seems to be clueless about those of us who are much healthier (and energized!) than others much younger competing for positions. There is quite a bit of sterotyping from the author that readers may or may not feel "inspired" by. The sad thing is, many people over 50 are well aware they will have to flex on salary, benefits, and working conditions. This isn't news. We ARE doing the job while the younger crowd is busy smoking or texting or talking on the phone with their friends. Hasn't anyone noticed? Apparently not!
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