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Joe Celko's SQL for Smarties: Advanced SQL Programming Third Edition (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems) Paperback – August 15, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0123693792 ISBN-10: 0123693799 Edition: 3rd

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Product Details

  • Series: The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems
  • Paperback: 840 pages
  • Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann; 3 edition (August 15, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0123693799
  • ISBN-13: 978-0123693792
  • Product Dimensions: 1.8 x 7.3 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,430,645 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This book is a classic, and this revision will merely solidify its position." --Rudy Limeback

SQL for Smarties is a well-known and highly regarded text in the industry and a new edition of the book will be sought by database practitioners regardless of the DBMS they use. --Craig Mullins, BMC Software

Book Description

A completely revised edition of the classic advanced SQL book!

More About the Author

I was a member of the ANSI X3H2 Database Standards Committee from 1987 to 1997 and helped write the ANSI/ISO SQL-89 and SQL-92 Standards. I have nine books and have written over 1200 columns in the computer trade and academic press, mostly dealing with data and databases.

I live in Austin,TX. When I am not writing, I am consulting, speaking at conferences, teaching SQL training classes anywhere on Earth or beating up newbies in SQL Newsgroups.

The rumor that I own only one black suit that I have worn for 30 years is false; I own six identical black suits that I have worn for 30 years.

Customer Reviews

This book is NOT an advanced SQL textbook.
J. Keller
Solutions to every day problems are built up step by step, with each step clearly showing the progression of the logic and the potential pitfalls.
Andrew Harris
A fair amount of typos, and a lot of unclear, careless pages that make you struggle for meaning (not always successfully).
Malleus Maleficarum

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Malleus Maleficarum on August 2, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is one of those books that are perhaps nice to have IN ADDITION to something better. Btw, do NOT overestimate the "for smarties" part in the title: the book is not all that advanced: it's more like an extensive cookbook with a lot of personal opinion thrown in (not always consistent; for example, in one place he inveighs against the evils of using sequential-number sequences as primary keys -- 'cause a table is not a sequence, you see, we're talking about sets here, who, by definition, are unordered -- OK, fine. Ten pages later he blasts the GUID type -- why? Because it's not inherently sequential and it's hard to spot the gaps in the sequences. But hey, why do we care about gaps? All we care about is that the field values be unique, which they are, gaps or no gaps. Seems like GUIDs should be perfect from the set-theoretical point of view, but no, he doesn't like them -- precisely because of the presence of those aspects, the lack of which he bemoaned one chapter back in the IDENTITY type. It's like he wrote these two chapters one ten years after the other, and forgot what he was talking about in one when writing the other.

The content (or rather the intent behind it) is very good. There's a logical progression from the overall-schema things, to tables, and so on, including such esoterica as hierarchies and graphs (which is good not only, or even not so much because of the topics themselves, but because nice recent SQL features like CTEs are used a lot in the sample code thus demonstrating their non-trivial use).
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Harris on July 4, 2006
Format: Paperback
Don't be tempted to buy this book unless you have at least a year of experience writing complex SQL and a reasonable knowledge of the underlying data structures and database paradigms. In fact the author has a brief gripe about beginners criticising his book as not being suited for them. The book is not designed for beginners. However, if you have a suitable level of experience then this book is a must. Full of technical know-how and the supporting theory or logic in most cases. The kind of knowledge, that takes decades to accumulate, jumps off every page. If you have done a few of those same hard yards you will quickly appreciate the benefit from the distilled experience on offer. The book is written in an easy conversational style that makes even the hardest stretches of logic easy to digest. The short and concise code samples demonstrate the points made in the text very well. Solutions to every day problems are built up step by step, with each step clearly showing the progression of the logic and the potential pitfalls. In short anyone with intermediate SQL skills or higher will get tremendous advantage out of this book, I thoroughly recommend it.

Starting from the theory of database design, the book moves into Normalization, data types operations, statements, views, functions, statistics, series and gaps, arrays, trees, temporal queries, OLAP and optimization (not a complete chapter list). In short many of the same topics you get in an introductory or intermediate level book. However the depth of the coverage and the practicality of the advice and treatments given to the actual problems that dealing with these things entails, sets this book apart.
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15 of 21 people found the following review helpful By J. Keller on March 28, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've seen various versions of this book sitting on DBA bookshelves for years. The concept is a good one - advanced sql for those of us who already have significant experience.

This book is NOT an advanced SQL textbook. Another reviewer, Tim Boyes, describes it as "SQL 201", and he's exactly right. Most of the content in this book is just barely above basic SQL knowledge, and half the time I felt like I was reading a re-hash of SQL BOL.

Another thing that I noticed (how could I miss it?) was the almost incomprehensible arrogance of the author, particularly when he compares the use of IDENTITY to drug abuse. Come on, Joe. That's just insulting.

This one's going back to Amazon.
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By SPP on December 5, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Being Non Vendor specific book, this book gave me all the tips and tricks to become a successful SQL programmer. This book gave me confident in working in any data base environments.

A big thanks to Joe.
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