John Adams

April 22, 2008 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Also available in CD Format
Song Title Artist
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Popularity  
30
1
2:44
30
2
1:24
30
3
1:35
30
4
2:20
30
5
2:20
30
6
2:56
30
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2:48
30
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6:05
30
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1:12
30
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3:26
30
11
5:30
30
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1:30
30
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1:54
30
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3:42
30
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1:08
30
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0:51
30
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1:49
30
18
1:20
30
19
1:07
30
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2:50
30
21
2:44
30
22
2:07
30
23
1:42
30
24
1:43
30
25
1:03
30
26
3:20
30
27
3:04
30
28
4:59
30
29
3:51
30
30
5:13
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: April 22, 2008
  • Release Date: April 22, 2008
  • Label: Varese Sarabande
  • Copyright: 2008 Home Box Office, Inc.
  • Total Length: 1:18:17
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0062WXVTC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #50,081 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

The music is excellent.
Dulcius Ex Asperis
Frankly, this song makes me want to start a revolution myself!
P.K. Ryan
Good technical quality.
A. J. Laban Esq

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By P.K. Ryan on April 27, 2008
Format: Audio CD
This is a superbly beautiful soundtrack from the recent HBO miniseries about our second President and Founding Father. I know virtually nothing about the technical aspect of music so I won't even try to describe that. All I will say is that this is a beautiful collection of classical music with a uniquely 18th century American flavor. It is heavy on violins which happens to be my favorite instrument.

Some of the songs are soft and delicate, while others are triumphantly upbeat. The Opening Titles track, perhaps my favorite, is an energetic and melodious blend of violins, whistles, drums and horns that has a distinctly American sound to it. Frankly, this song makes me want to start a revolution myself! That being said, many of the songs are much more subdued, and they tend to invoke a sort of melancholy reflection or even downright heartache. Others, such as 'Adams in the Cold' are not really sad nor triumphant, but have a strangely ironic yet perky sound, if that makes any sense. All in all, this is a brilliant and passionate collection of uniquely American music.

The best songs for me are:

Opening Titles
Leaving for Philadelphia
Abigail
Adams in the Cold
Letter to Jefferson
Farewell to Adams
John Says Goodbye
Abigail Dies
Hot Air Balloon
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Richard L. Smith on April 24, 2008
Format: Audio CD
HBO and PlayTone score again with their tremendous miniseries adaptation of David McCullough's Pulitzer-prize winning book, and the soundtrack to the miniseries is every bit as rich, resonating and timeless as the story of the chief architect of the American Revolution, its second president and unsung hero, John Adams. The score is outstanding, proving once again that a whole new crop of talented young musicians (including Rob Lane & Joseph Vitarelli here, and guys like Charlie Clouser, Bear McCreary and Tyler Bates) is springing full-grown from the foreheads of the masters and carrying on the legacy of the best in the original motion picture soundtrack subgenre. Stellar work!!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Birdman on October 13, 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
While browsing a mass merchant's video department one day, I saw two Goths who were studying the JOHN ADAMS DVD set with rapt attention. With their shoe-polish black hair, facial piercing,enormous key rings and nail-head boots, it was an unlikely scenario, and even more surprising when the taller kid said, "Did you ever see this, dude?" then paused. "It was, like, one of the only times in my life I really GOT what this America thing is all about."

Well, three cheers for that -- not only for the film to which he referred, but to the soundtrack which heightened the drama.

Not since James Horners' epic score for GLORY have I enjoyed the score of an historical film as much as this. Like Horner,Rob Lane and Joseph Vitarelli draw on the period themes and harmonies of a revolutionary age to build their musical backdrop to this much-admired mini-series. Here, though, the composers infuse their work with a more expansive variety of melodies and little sentimentality. With its imaginative, heroic orchestration, the score for JOHN ADAMS -- clocking in at over 70 minutes -- is richly satisfying. I've played it more than ten times since receiving it and still haven't tired of it.

The agitated fiddle dirge that forms the counterpoint for the main title is, perhaps, the most stirring, distinctly American title score I've heard since "Ashokan Farewell" in Ken Burns' THE CIVIL WAR. Reflecting the revolutionary fervor which inspired it so accurately, the piece rises in intensity until the listener's goosebumps compete with memories of Playtone's memorable production. It's rare to encounter such a varied and artful score on television -- although HBO had already broke the mold with Thomas Newman's score for ANGELS IN AMERICA.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Quaver on May 8, 2008
Format: Audio CD
This set is good, except

1) They forgot to add the Main Theme 4:00 full version played during the end credits.

2) Although the main theme is excellent, this and the other Rob Lane compositions sound like they are mostly comprised of computer-midi generated instrumentations accompanied by a few "real" soloist instuments, while the other Joseph Vitarelli compositions are played - recorded from actual orchestrations.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Gregory P. Carroll on August 28, 2009
Format: Audio CD
This was a great series on the life of John Adams, (Boston attorney, signer of the declaration of independence, our first vice president and second president) based on writer/historian David McCullough's Pulitzer Prize winning book. Great acting, directing, music, cinematography, makeup. It has it all. For TV (especially a miniseries -- you can't do much better). The opening music theme creates goosebumps and the whole seies makes you glad to be an American and what the founding fathers went through to achieve our independence. As usual for historical dramas there are some historical inaccuracies, but these are limited mainly to chronology and specific events that occurred in his family and a few statements, that I guess for dramatic purposes were placed in particular situations (e.g. unlike in this series his renewed relationship with Thomas Jefferson actually took place before Abigail Adams death not after, and his daughter married when she was over in England not at John Adams home; did he and his brother Samuel Adams actually have a disagreement about or witness a tar and feathering - there is no historical documentation on this, stuff like that). A lot of dialogue beween John Adams and Abigail and John Adams and Jefferson came from actual archived letters -- which there are many). The best episodes are 1 through 3 as America strives for independence and the new nation is born. The least action event oriented episode although still well done is the last episode which mainly chronicles (and rather quickly) how everyone dies. For a long series though it holds your attention throughout and makes you sad when its over. Deserving of its 13 Emmy awards! If all TV could be like this, Id watch it more.
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