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John Dewey & Decline Of American Education: How Patron Saint Of Schools Has Corrupted Teaching & Learning Hardcover – January 6, 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Intercollegiate Studies Institute; 1 edition (January 6, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1932236511
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932236514
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,815,156 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Henry T. Edmondson III is Professor of Public Administration and Political Science at the Georgia College and State University in Milledgeville, Georgia. Besides Dewey, he has written a number of articles and books on Jefferson, Shakespeare, and Flannery O?Connor, including the recently published Return to Good and Evil: Flannery O?Connor?s Response to Nihilism.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Blake R. Oakley on February 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover
For contemporary educators, this work will prove to be an invaluable resource. Even if, when finished, you find that you disagree with the arguments crafted, you will still be forced to think deeply about the many issues and dichotomies surrounding the various directions of educational philosophy.
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26 of 39 people found the following review helpful By C. P. Williams on May 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I was teaching first-grade in Brooklyn when I read this book, and found a lot of Edmondson's arguments persuasive, given my classroom experience. Deweyan pedagogy is challenging, if not in some ways damaging, to implement even in the smallest ways in an actual classroom. That said, Edmondson's book isn't really about Dewey or his thought. It's a political work, which repeats a number of points made by educational traditionalists, but doesn't really represent Dewey's thought accurately, or engage with him critically in a serious way. Edmondson takes the portrait of Dewey presented by Russell Kirk in "The Conservative Mind" and imputes it to Dewey. Again, let me stress, I often agreed with Edmondson's assessment of American education, but his book is NOT an accurate or effective account of Dewey's thought and what's wrong with it. John Patrick Diggins' "The Promise of Pragmatism" remains the best account of Dewey's flaws, though it is primarily political, rather than pedagogical.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a shocking book describing how the malevolent influence on one man, with a clear vision of what he wanted to do, totally changed the educational system in America, and we are reaping the sad rewards. Short, smart, clear, documented, read this book, and give it to any teacher you know. They need to know who shape the profession they are involved with.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book on John Dewey's influence on American education. Well written. Well documented. I highly recommend it to anyone who is interested in current education quagmire in which we find ourselves as Edmondson gives insight as to how we got where we are.
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17 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Suppresst on May 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
In 51 years of observing and experiencing the public education system in America I formed three broad impressions. The first was that educators must have a fondness for experimentation, since they always seemed to be reinventing the wheel. The second, was that all this reinventing was disturbing considering that those same educators didn't even seem to have a firm grasp on what outcome they desired. The third impression I had was that all the experimentation must be good for educators in the sense that it probably gives them ample excuse to go on taxpayer funded junkets to symposiums in swank places like San Franciso; all in the name of discovering the next best "method" of educating children. This book has made it clear why I developed those impressions over the years. The author of all the chaos in the schools is a man who wrote 130 books/papers on educational theory but could not manage or get results in the one actual classroom he taught in - namely John Dewy. Only a liberal could follow such a blind guide. Dewey might be likened to a Jimmy Carter of Education.

This book is not as in-depth as one might like, but the author points out in the preface that oceans of ink have already been spilled over Dewey and his theories. This book seeks to cut through those oceans and offer a brief and devastating critique of the reckless experimenter named Dewey. Dewey serves as type of person who thinks he knows better than parents how to raise and educate children, and who flippantly would use children as pawns in an end-game of social engineering. Sort of sounds like Marxism doesn't it?
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27 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Susan Masone on May 2, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Most of my thirty four years of teaching the physical sciences and math were enjoyable despite being beclouded by the frustrating confusion of the pernicious decline of educational statistics. Our most earnest efforts in "inovative" programs, better book and innumerable caimpaigns for bigger budgets and better schools notwithstanding, the stats continued their depressing downslides. Why??? Professor Edmondson answers that critical one word question most succinctly in the 123 pages of "John Dewey and the Decline of American Education. It is a compelling read for everyone.

Steve Masone, veteran educator and author of Hammer of Chalk
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26 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Robert E. Pride on April 9, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Dr. Edmondsons' book on Dewey was a great read. It was an revealing expose' on the root cause of what is wrong with the present school system. As such, it answered many puzzling questions i. e.: Why do so many public school teachers send their children to private schools? Why do so many parents opt for homeschooling? Why do so many parents desire school vouchers? Is it all an unconscious flight from the insidious influence of "Deweyism"? Dr. Edmondson adroitly answers these queries with insight and clarity.
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