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John and Empire: Initial Explorations Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-0567028402 ISBN-10: 0567028402 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 440 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury T&T Clark; 1 edition (May 19, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0567028402
  • ISBN-13: 978-0567028402
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.6 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,783,838 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Carter is at the forefront of those biblical scholars who emphasize the role of interaction with the Roman Empire as an essential horizon for the New Testament literature...This study is a thorough reading of John's text from this vantage point. Serious students will find this an informative and challenging exposition of the Fourth Gospel." - Donald Senior, C.P., The Bible Today, September 2008 (Donald Senior The Bible Today)

"Carter's demonstration of the way in which the Gospel of John summons its audience to negotiate the imperial context is bold and compelling...Johannine scholars and other interested readers will benefit from engagement with it...his discussion will surely generate more interest and study in this area. Those who read this book will no longer interpret John's Gospel without an awareness of the ways in which Roman imperial reality is reflected within its pages." —Art Wright, Interpretation, January 2009

Mention —New Testament Abstracts, 2009

"Warren Carter's John and Empire serves as an excellent introduction to the recent movement toward reading the NT in light of imperial Rome. Even though Carter has explored this motif or reading strategy in other books of the NT, he has clearly proven himself as a Johannine scholar. Carter's writing is organized and easy to read. He carefully weaves his argument together between chapters and is careful in his presentation of evidence. John and Empire is a needed contribution to Johannine studies, especially as it relates to this recent movement regarding imperial Rome. It will be difficult for future work on John's context and influences to ignore Carter's contribution." — Edward W. Klink III, Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society (Edward W. Klink III, Talbot School of Theology, Biola University Journal Of Evangelical Theological Society)

'This book offers deep and broad resources for those interested in hearing John's gospel in an imperial context.' (Trinity Seminary Review)

'One of the most significant works on this topic yet published, not least because of its scale... the wealth of the evidence that Carter adduces, together with the theoretical sophistication and nuance of his overarching argument, render this an interesting and challenging book.'
(Expository Times)

“Carter is at the forefront of those biblical scholars who emphasize the role of interaction with the Roman Empire as an essential horizon for the New Testament literature...This study is a thorough reading of John’s text from this vantage point. Serious students will find this an informative and challenging exposition of the Fourth Gospel.” - Donald Senior, C.P., The Bible Today, September 2008 (Sanford Lakoff The Bible Today)

“Carter’s demonstration of the way in which the Gospel of John summons its audience to negotiate the imperial context is bold and compelling…Johannine scholars and other interested readers will benefit from engagement with it…his discussion will surely generate more interest and study in this area. Those who read this book will no longer interpret John’s Gospel without an awareness of the ways in which Roman imperial reality is reflected within its pages.” –Art Wright, Interpretation, January 2009

Mention –New Testament Abstracts, 2009

"Warren Carter's John and Empire serves as an excellent introduction to the recent movement toward reading the NT in light of imperial Rome. Even though Carter has explored this motif or reading strategy in other books of the NT, he has clearly proven himself as a Johannine scholar. Carter's writing is organized and easy to read. He carefully weaves his argument together between chapters and is careful in his presentation of evidence. John and Empire is a needed contribution to Johannine studies, especially as it relates to this recent movement regarding imperial Rome. It will be difficult for future work on John's context and influences to ignore Carter's contribution." — Edward W. Klink III, Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society (Sanford Lakoff Journal Of Evangelical Theological Society)

'This book offers deep and broad resources for those interested in hearing John’s gospel in an imperial context.’ (Sanford Lakoff)

'One of the most significant works on this topic yet published, not least because of its scale… the wealth of the evidence that Carter adduces, together with the theoretical sophistication and nuance of his overarching argument, render this an interesting and challenging book.’
(Sanford Lakoff)

Review in the Bulletin for Biblical Research

About the Author

Warren Carter is Professor of New Testament Brite Divinity School Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX

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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rev. Ronald Cassidy on January 23, 2010
Format: Paperback
In this book Warren Carter presents a thorough and detailed study of those passages in John's Gospel that resonate with titles and concepts familiar in the Roman society of the day. He argues that these concepts were so common that a writer such as John could not ignore them or fail to respond to them when writing his Gospel.
Carter's characteristic term is "negotiation" to describe the relationship between the Ephesian Christians and their Roman overlords. Roman domination is a fact of life in Ephesus, and the Christians there have to negotiate a modus vivendi, a way of living under that domination without compromising their faith.
Unlike other studies (such as that of Thatcher) Carter's actually concludes that some Christians had been so successful in that negotiation that they were over-assimilated to their environment, so that John has to employ a "rhetoric of distance" to call them back from their over-comfortable position.
It is tempting to suggest that the Johannine Christians were "comfortable" in their relationship with the dominant Roman authorities because many of the issues that Carter alludes to were not in fact issues for them at all. Although the writer of the Fourth Gospel and his readers were undoubtedly well aware of contemporary political realities in the Roman world in which they lived, evidence is lacking that they felt oppressed or persecuted within that world at the time the Fourth Gospel was written and first read. Later, yes - at that time, no.
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