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John Napier: Logarithm John Paperback – August 10, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-1901663709 ISBN-10: 1901663701

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Editorial Reviews

Review

What a wonderful little book: it is beautifully written and has wonderful photographs and illustrations ... Moreover it accomplishes its purpose, to give us a glimpse into the nature and times of John Napier.' History of Mathematics Newsletter 'This work offers a fascinating insight to a man whose name is know by all Scots, but whose work and mind reached far beyond the fields of maths and science.' Life and Work 'Although this is slender volume it is a delight to read, with numerous illustrations enhancing the well-written text. Not only are Napier's life and inventions described, but there are chapters which put these in context.' Mathematical Association News

About the Author

Lynne Gladstone-Millar is a freelance journalist and writer.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 58 pages
  • Publisher: National Museums Of Scotland (August 10, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1901663701
  • ISBN-13: 978-1901663709
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,560,617 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Harvey Solomon on June 6, 2007
Format: Paperback
The ordinary lives of famous mathameticians rarely prove to be as interesting as their professional activities and such is the case with John Napier. This slim volume is, at least to my way of thinking, a disappointment in that it provides only the most superficial insight into Napier's thinking concerning the period during which he conceived the idea of the logarithm and produced the first table of such numbers.

For centuries thereafter they significantly simplified the multiplication and division of large numbers. Until the advent of the scientific calculator tables of logarithms were in wide use. Napier's contribution was recognized for its value by the major natural philosophers of his day and an indepth presentation of this aspect of his life would be a worthy contribution to the literature. Napiers bones, an abacus like device without wires or beads is also rather poorly covered in the book. The bones were the precursor of the slide rule and may, indeed, be among the earliest forms of mechanical calculators.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on November 14, 2007
Format: Paperback
What there is of it is very good. Personally I'd have liked it better if it was expanded more. It might be nice to see more material about how to actually use logs in problem solving, or how logs were used in problem solving in the past.
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