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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Long Life of Achievement and Pain
Fred Kaplan's book John Quincy Adams: American Visionary is remarkably good, far more interesting, insightful, and informative than I had expected. I had imagined that our sixth president was an inconsequential mediocrity who inherited his political status from his father, John Adams, our second president, and commonly regarded as one of America's founding fathers. I...
Published 6 months ago by not a natural

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40 of 47 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars UNEVEN
At the risk of stating the obvious, John Quincy Adams should be remembered for more than being the son of a Founding Father and a one-term President. So a new biography to bring him out of the historical fog is a welcome and well worthy endeavor. Unfortunately - at least for this reader - this book isn't it.

First, this cradle to the grave biography is a very...
Published 6 months ago by JoeV


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40 of 47 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars UNEVEN, January 26, 2014
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JoeV "Reader" (Arlington Hts, IL) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: John Quincy Adams: American Visionary (Hardcover)
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At the risk of stating the obvious, John Quincy Adams should be remembered for more than being the son of a Founding Father and a one-term President. So a new biography to bring him out of the historical fog is a welcome and well worthy endeavor. Unfortunately - at least for this reader - this book isn't it.

First, this cradle to the grave biography is a very concerted effort to humanize JQA; a very admirable task, for much like his father, John Quincy took his public service and sense of duty very seriously; and therefore also much like his father, he was not the easiest to person to "like". The reader is presented with JQA's extensive reading list, his writings/ opinions and prose/poetry - much of this quoted directly from his letters, speeches and his lifelong journal. So there are a lot of quotes - too many for this reader - this over-reliance resulting in the narrative both losing its flow and poignancy.

Don't get me wrong, there is much I learned here - particularly how much JQA traveled during his lifetime - this when 50 miles was a "journey" - how hard he worked - and another for instance - Mrs. JQA's health issues. Poor Louisa Adams seemingly never feeling well for any extended period of time causing much concern and never permitting the marriage to blossom into the partnership the senior Adams and Abigail had.

One other quirk of the narrative worth mentioning here. Events in JQA's life are stated - his marriage, appointments, elections - with the circumstances leading to them subsequently covered. Not necessarily a bad technique in and of itself, but here the transitions aren't smooth and at times, aren't coherent - which became confusing.

Lastly the closer JQA came to center stage in his life - meaning Washington, DC - the less detailed this narrative becomes - his presidency and time served in Congress - almost 25 years - covered superficially in the last 140 pages of this almost 600 page book.

John Quincy's was an accomplished life - many of his achievements outside of the public/historical spotlight, i.e. the Monroe Doctrine, the Treaty of Ghent. He was much more than simply his father's son and much like David McCullough's bio did for his father, deserves to come out of the historical shadows. This book makes a valiant effort, but alas, results only in a step in the right direction.
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32 of 37 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A painstaking literary biography, May 11, 2014
By 
Bill Barto (Fairfax, Virginia United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: John Quincy Adams: American Visionary (Hardcover)
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Biographies are difficult to write. A biographer seldom approaches the subject with a clean slate. Many (most?) presidential biographers approach the subject from a historical or political perspective and emphasize events or societal currents, sometimes to the detriment of the subject of the biography. In the case of this biography, we have a retired English professor writing a biography of an extremely prolific political figure who had real literary talent. The focus of this work is clearly on the person and writings of Adams rather than other aspects of his life. And yet, even accepting this prospective bias, I am left unsatisfied by this work.

On the positive side, it is an exhaustive study of John Quincy Adams, sixth President of the United States, 17-year Congressman, Senator, Secretary of State, professor, author, diarist (50 volumes!), and anti-slavery advocate. His is a remarkable story, and the author tells it in great detail, relying on correspondence and journals to provide a first-hand account of many incidents in Adams' life.

That being noted, I found this book to be very tiresome, oddly organized, and lacking in historical and political context. For example, the author spends over 100 pages on the childhood and education of Adams but less than 40 on his presidency. What many authorities consider to be Adams' most significant period, his time in Congress, receives only a bit more coverage than childhood and early legal career. The author mentions significant historical events, e.g., the XYZ affair on page 156, without previous explanation. Elsewhere, the author begins to discuss a topic but leaves off without completing the discussion or explaining the significance of the matters mentioned. For example, the author mentions that Adams sent dozens of letters home from his travels in Silesia and was open to the possibility of their publication, and yet no mention is made of their ultimate publication in a 387-page book titled "Letters on Silesia" by a London publisher. The whole episode in Prussia and the travels in Silesia is given quite extended treatment in a chapter almost as long as the chapter on Adams as president, while Unger - another Adams biographer - considers this period in a chapter of just 15 pages, a much more appropriate allocation of space and effort.

At various points in this otherwise literary-focused biography, there are interesting insinuations of political insight that attempt to co-opt Adams' legacy for progressive politics, notwithstanding the popular and long-standing view that Adams is properly considered a moderate conservative (even Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., a very progressive scholar, put Adams in that part of the political spectrum). At one point, the author describes Adams' political legacy as "land-grant universities, the Panama Canal, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Federal Reserve, and the Interstate Highway System," and the back cover of the book links Adams to "FDR and Obama." Suffice it to say that the book did not persuade me that the Adams lineage extended quite so far in that direction, and further elaboration (in an already overlong book) would have been necessary to properly substantiate such an assertion.

A biographer must sift the sources and make assessments of the relative weight of various segments of the subject's life. These tasks are especially important when dealing with someone whose personal diaries extend to 50 volumes, for whom there are many public records and speeches, and who has been the subject of many other biographies. This book would have benefited from a heavy and objective editing, and, absent such, I cannot recommend this book to any but fans of the author or enthusiasts of Adams for whom less lengthy - and more effective - biographies do not suffice.
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32 of 39 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I thought long and hard about how I was going to rate this book . . ., March 24, 2014
This review is from: John Quincy Adams: American Visionary (Hardcover)
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. . . and give it a reluctant -- but earned -- three stars.

First -- the good bits (and there were quite a few!) The most valuable part of of this book begins with the fact that it was written at all. Critical biographies of significant leaders who have fallen out of the mainstream of public view are extremely important because they provide context and background and can thus provide a different and unique perspective that can be missed.

I learned a great deal about a President about whom I already knew a fair amount. I knew that he was well-traveled in his youth -- but had no idea as to the extent of that travel. I knew that he was, at one point, Minister to Russia -- but was unaware of several of his other diplomatic postings. I knew that he was a remarkably well-educated and well-read individual -- but not to the depths of the matter. I knew that he served for 17 years with distinction in the United States House of Representatives following his Presidency -- but didn't previously know that this was public service that he felt was his duty to undertake -- even against his family wishes, and, in the end, to the detriment of his health.

In short, I found that I had learned a great deal -- and that what I learned was interesting and informative.

There were two glaring negatives, each one costing the book a star.

1) Both in the promotional material sent to me (understandable) AND in the blurbs and introduction to the book itself (much less appropriate) both the author and the publisher go out of their way to pre-dispose the reader to a particular conclusion: namely, that John Quincy Adams, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt and Barak Obama viewed the Presidency in similar ways and had similar progressive points of view which guided their respective Presidencies. Now this may be true or this may be false (and in my view, the author did not make that case) but as an avid reader of history and historical biography, I want to be allowed to form my own conclusions without prompting.

2) In a somewhat similar vein, there were times in the text when one could not be sure if Quincy Adams' view was being presented, or if Fred Kaplan's view about what he thought Quincy Adams' view was (or should have been) was being presented. For example, during the discussion of the Mexican-American War during the Polk administration, it was clear that Quincy Adams opposed both the war and the President. So far, so good. But while the author was analyzing the opinions of the House during the war, it was difficult to ascertain whether Quincy Adams felt the war was illegal; whether Kaplan felt the war was illegal (a subject for a different book); or whether Kaplan "felt" that Quincy Adams felt the war was illegal. In other words, was I reading Quincy Adams' view (which is what I wanted to learn) or was I reading the author's view (which wasn't supposed to be the point of the book.)

Just let me read the book and form my own conclusions . . . if I want further information, I know how to find it.
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Long Life of Achievement and Pain, February 12, 2014
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not a natural "Bob Bickel" (huntington, west virginia United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: John Quincy Adams: American Visionary (Hardcover)
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Fred Kaplan's book John Quincy Adams: American Visionary is remarkably good, far more interesting, insightful, and informative than I had expected. I had imagined that our sixth president was an inconsequential mediocrity who inherited his political status from his father, John Adams, our second president, and commonly regarded as one of America's founding fathers. I had no good reason for my unfavorable assessment of John Quincy. He simply had the misfortune of being a one-term postscript to the revolution who took office long before the Civil War. Given my limited knowledge of eighteenth and early nineteenth century American history, there was nothing historically momentous with which I could connect him. Following Kaplan, however, I now think that my ignorance led me to vastly undervalue a genuinely brilliant and undeniably capable patriot who served his county well in a variety of official and unofficial ways over the course of a life that lasted eighty years. In truth, John Quincy embodied just about every virtue that I never expected of a little-remembered Nineteenth Century politician.

From childhood, John Quincy was insatiably curious and a voracious reader. At an age when I had just gotten past the Dick and Jane reader, he was already studying the classics. Shakespeare and Alexander Pope quickly became his favorites, and when he learned Latin he developed a lifelong fondness for Cicero, whose writings seemed to prefigure John Quincy's experiences in the world of politics and diplomacy, providing him with inspiration and solace. When he was only fourteen, he accompanied an American emissary to Moscow and served as his translator and interpreter. The language mandated for the highest level of government and international affairs in Russia was French, and John Quincy already spoke it fluently. Throughout his life, John Quincy wrote voluminously and with abundant and varied knowledge in a refined but masculine style that made each of his essays, reports, written speeches, his precious diary, and numerous other documents an instructive pleasure to read even today.

A Harvard graduate, anyone reading Kaplan's richly detailed biography might conclude that John Quincy was destined to be a man of letters and the arts, and he was, but he also had to make a living. Though it interested him little, he followed his father's example by selecting the law as his career. He was apprenticed to prominent practicing attorneys for three years, and subsequently established a practice of his own. It's difficult to imagine a man of John Quincy's eloquence and learning failing in the practice of law, and he proved himself capable even if decidedly unenthusiastic. However, the city of Boston, the town of Quincy, and the rest of his native New England had a surfeit of lawyers, and John Quincy made ends meet but little more. Throughout his remarkable life, his generosity and sometimes misplaced trust in friends and relatives assured that money was nearly always a concern, an important factor in delaying his age at marriage until thirty.

Whether working as an attorney, serving in political office, or instructing Harvard students in rhetoric, John Quincy's family, both nuclear and extended, was prominent in his heart and mind. Were they second to his patriotic sense of duty? It's a tough call. In any case, this was a time when a family was not a family without children. John Quincy's beloved wife Louisa suffered four miscarriages before the difficult birth of their first child, who they named George Washington Adams. More miscarriages, more children, a still birth, and a daughter who died before she reached her second birthday were to follow. John Quincy, his wife, and their children, throughout their lives, were often quite ill with infections and unidentified ailments of various kinds. Life in the first half of the Nineteenth Century seems to have been almost unendurably difficult, for women especially, but for men as well. The medicine of the time relied on bleeding with leaches to diminish infection and on laudnam to relieve pain and anxiety, and whatever else was customary, regardless of its efficacy.

As President, John Quincy relied on the wealth of wisdom he had acquired serving as a legislator and as an effective Secretary of State. Much as today, however, his time in office was one of gridlock, with opposing parties and ideologies short-circuiting the effective function of government. John Quincy's view was that the federal government had an obligation to promote the economic development of the nation through investment in infrastructure, reform of an outmoded and risk-ridden banking system, fostering educational opportunity, promoting commerce and industry, and in a variety of other ways contributing to the creation of a cohesive and prosperous union.

His adversaries, however, Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson conspicuous among them, saw such reforms as a threat to states' rights and, more importantly, a thinly veiled challenge to the slave-based agricultural society of the south. It's true that John Quincy was opposed to slavery, but he was not a radical abolitionist. Nevertheless, he brilliantly foresaw that maintenance of the status quo would surely result in a bloody civil war. As long as the three-fifths clause remained in the constitution (each slave was worth three-fifths of a citizen), the South would have an Electoral College advantage that the North would not indefinitely tolerate.

During his one term as President, contemporary-sounding gridlock prevented John Quincy from achieving the union-strengthening reforms he had long championed. Later, his New England constituents persuaded him to run for Congress, and he served with distinction in the House until his death. Even when aged and ill, his oratorical skill and stamina remained impressive.

In many ways, John Quincy Adams was a man of his times -- he abhorred miscegenation, did nothing on behalf of illegally dispossessed Native Americans, and had an oddly circumspect view of Jews. Furthermore, he could have given his long-suffering wife a reprieve from numerous exhausting and painful pregnancies had he followed the example of the Biblical character Onan. Though proscribed by the Bible, failure to do so seems simply cruel. Nevertheless, John Quincy was a man with learned foresight and the attainments of an accomplished intellectual who also understood the world of slash-and-burn politics and dreaded the ignorance of its practitioners. The timing and circumstances of his political career prevented him from becoming commonly regarded as a great man, but Fred Kaplan's biography makes abundantly clear that he was no ordinary political operative with a limited, unreflective, self-serving agenda. In my view, given the time and the place, he was about as good as could be found.

Kaplan's book, moreover, is excellent, based on mastery of historical materials, a clear and accessible prose style, and a gift for turning a massive amount of information into an intelligible and interesting life story. Kaplan's book is long and time-consuming, but it's worth the time and effort.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars adept politician, February 16, 2014
This review is from: John Quincy Adams: American Visionary (Hardcover)
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Over the past several years there have been a number of books published about our sixth president, his wife, and the times in which they lived. John Quincy Adams, a one-term president (and a minority one elected by the House of Representatives), led a very high profile, influential life on both sides of his presidency. Before, he was an accomplished diplomat and after he served as a member of the House of Representatives - the only former president to so serve.
Son of John and Abigail Adams, John Quincy was an intellectual, forward-thinking American with exceptional literary talents and was the consummate diarist, one to rival the Englishman, Samuel Pepys. He negotiated treaties ending wars, settled land boundaries and acquired territory for the country. As president, he proposed an extensive program for internal improvements, supported a high tariff and reduced the national debt by more than half. The lack of a solid political network left many of his plans adrift and left him, like his father, a one-term president.
Kaplan's book is a slow read, filled with many fascinating details. Settle in and enjoy the journey.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An honest assessment of a Deeply Committed Public Servant, February 19, 2014
This review is from: John Quincy Adams: American Visionary (Hardcover)
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Written with a view of highlighing his interest in and his ability as a writer of both prose and poetry and his passionate desire for a unified and thriving nation, Fred Kaplan's newest book and newest treatment of the sixth President of the United States is, in my opinion, an honest, fair, and comprehensive treatment of John Quincy Adams.

Having read Marie Hecht's 1972 biography, John Quincy Adams: A Personal History of An Independent Man, almost four and a half years ago, I was interested to compare, as best I could remember, her treatment with Kaplan's treatment of JQA, John Quincy Adams:American Visionary (HarperCollins Publisher). What I find with Kaplan is a fuller and as already stated, comprehensive treatment of Adams apart from his Presidential legacy.

Of note to me is Kaplan's ability to paint a strong emotional portrait of Adams who was in turn, a deeply grieved father-to-be whose wife Louisa had nine miscarriages and one stillborn child; a hopeful, but disappointed, and grief stricken father over two of his sons, one of whom committed suicide, who caused the family much embarrassment and pain; a devoted husband of over 50 years to Louisa whose health was chronically unstable; and an anxious man who wondered, throughout his life, if his work mattered.Yet Kaplan does a wonderful job of weaving in the constant thread of a firm believer in the Union and a passionate supporter of a strong and vital central government as a tool in developing a better educated and prosperous nation who was not above using his sharp mind and sharp tongue to advance his agenda. The result is a very human portrait of a man who served as chief US diplomat of a developing nation at an age thought unthinkable today, who served in both houses of Congress, was Secretary of State, and President.

I also found Kaplan's study of Adams' views of character and ethics fascinating. His detailing of his unrelenting work ethic, his catalog of Adams' strong view of honor and teamwork that was often bruised and battered in the changing political climate of America's first half-century, his long practice of journaling as well as reading, translating, and writing poetry, and noting his acceptance of Christianity but without the theological dogma that would place him at odds with much of at least Evangelical belief today, provided this reader with a portrait of a deeply personal, independent, well educated, and yet passionately committed public servant and person.

Another significant sketch is found in the transitional segments of life Adams experienced when he returned from his diplomatic duties and found America to have significantly changed in his absence. Of note in this regard was the change in both personal attitudes toward him, especially after his eight year absence during the first and second decades of the 1800's, following his resignation as US Senator. Such passages creates a sketch of JQA as one who often seemed to be of both a recent past and a distant future at the same time and often at odds with the political status quo.

The result of this effort is however, a highly readable and very informative telling of Adams' life and times. And it is this readability and informative nature which makes this book a very important addition to the every expanding bibliography of the American Presidency.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars because I was disappointed that his presidential years were relatively glossed over in ..., August 10, 2014
This review is from: John Quincy Adams: American Visionary (Hardcover)
I am in the process of reading a biography of each president in chronological order. When it came time to read about our 6th president--John Quincy Adams--it just so happened this Kaplan effort was on recent release book shelves and I considered it fate that I buy this book.

Other than John Quincy being the son of John Adams, I literally did not have one iota of information about this man in my head. From this perspecitive I am rating this book four stars....because if you know nothing about the man John Quincy you will certainly have a robust catalog of information on his life after reading this book.

I cannot rate this five stars, however, because I was disappointed that his presidential years were relatively glossed over in favor of the rest of his life. His presidential years were covered in 37 pages of a nearly 600 page book. I know authors face a tough situation when writing a biography on a president. How do you competently and fully cover the man's entire life in a digestable format? It is a tough task and I sympathize with Kaplan. My motivation to read about our presidents is to help put our recent presidents and their decision making while in office into historical perspective. So naturally, I am looking for presidential decisions in the kind of detail that, ironically, Kaplan delivered for John Quincy's life outside of the White House--but not while serving as our president.

That said, I buy biographies that cover the entire life because I want to understand the values, circumstances and background that each president brought to the White House. If I rated the book solely on years surrounding the presidency I would rate it five stars. I got the impression reading this book that John Quincy Adams was a highly learned, thoughtful and articulate man, as much so as anyone of his time, which served him and our country well in making balanced, well-informed decisons. That is the kind of man I can appreciate. I feel he may be one our most underappreciated politicians in history, often overshadowed by the ugliness of party lines and lobbying that began to dominate the culture of our government during his generation.

Overall, a very good introduction to John Quincy Adams and I appreciate Fred Kaplan bringing him to life for me.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent biography of one of the lesser known giants of U.S. history, March 4, 2014
This review is from: John Quincy Adams: American Visionary (Hardcover)
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Fred Kaplan's John Quincy Adams: American Visionary is a terrific autobiography of the 6th President of the United States.

John Quincy Adams often seems overlooked as but a shadow of his famous father, but in reality he was an fascinating person, scholar, and statesman. In spite of any accusations of nepotism that were hurled at him during his time, John Quicny Adams earned his political position by dint of hard work and by honing his extraordinary talents.

Putting together the life story of an Adams is likely biographer heaven. The entire Adams family (and their spouses) were prolific writers. Knowing early on that they were an important part of the history of the United States, many of their letters, diaries, and formal writings have been preserved and most of them have been stored at the Massachusetts Historical Society. This huge trove of private and public writings give incredible insight into the Adams family members' lives.

Of course, taking such a mass of information, making sense of it, and putting it into fluid narrative takes considerable skill and Kaplan is up to the task. Using a modest, unadorned writing style, Kaplan keeps himself in the background, while he shows us what John Quincy Adams was like, from the perspective of his family, friends, and rivals. Given access to private papers and John Quincy Adam's diary Kaplan is able to paint an intimate portrait of a very private man.

Kaplan has an eye for highlighting just the right details to round out Adam's character. For example, when he describes Adam's life at college, Kaplan highlights and incident found in Adam's diary where Harvard students assembled, got drunk, and broke a number of windows or in the words of the young John Quincy, "Such are the great achievements of many sons of Harvard." (It is interesting to see that not much has changed in terms of behavior at college since the late 1700s.) He also uses Adam's diary to give us Adams' unvarnished opinions of various ethnic groups and religions. These references show us that even someone like Adams who was a very forward thinking person was still quite entrenched within his own times.

Adams had an incredible career. He traveled broadly with his father as a child. He worked as a lawyer, served as a diplomat, taught as a Harvard professor, was a secretary of state (where he was the major force behind creating the Monroe Doctrine), became the 6th President of the United States, and later served in congress. He was fluent in English, French, and German and had a hobby of translating classic, Latin texts.

This is not hagiography, however. Adams was not an easy man. Similar to his father, Adams felt that it was his duty to serve his country and had little patience for those who used political power for personal gain. He was an individualist who believed in the good fight rather than the party line, an attitude that would hobble his ability to govern as a president. An apolitical man in a very political time, Kaplan is able to use his sources to explain Adams success and failures politics.

If there is a flaw in the book, it may be that Kaplan is at times a too thorough. Some expositions of Adam's poetry are a little too long and there may be too much emphasis on some of the details of Adam's European adventures in diplomacy. However, it's hard to imagine there wouldn't be at least a few, tiny sags in a 500+ page book and quite frankly for a book of this length it is a quick read. I was a little disappointed that Kaplan didn't go into more depth about the Corrupt Bargain of Adam's 1824 election as President. I would have been interested to know more of the John Quincy's personal perception of the event and heard more about how his rivals interpreted the election. These, however, are minor things.

On the whole this is an excellent biography of a less popular giant of American history. It is well worth the read and enjoyable to boot. Highly recommended.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very detailed life, March 25, 2014
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This review is from: John Quincy Adams: American Visionary (Hardcover)
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Author Fred Kaplan is a stickler for detail. He describes in elaborate details the early childhood of John Quincy Adams, his years in France and Russia, and then his life back in Massachusetts post Revolutionary war. He was close to both parents and siblings and enjoyed a privileged life. When Adam's father died in 1826, however, things change for the man who later became the sixth president.

Kaplan shows how John Quincy lived in the shadows of his cantankerous father and domineering mother in his early life. But whatever privilege John Quincy enjoyed in his early years came back to haunt him when he ran for the re-election to the presidency against Andrew Jackson. John Quincy Adams faced relentless scrutiny and distrust from his own Congress.

Kaplan portrays Adams as a progressive ahead of his time: he had foreseen the end of slavery, the equality of women and native Americans, and the development of super highways for easier transport of goods. He comes across as man wanting respect for the native American tribes, whose land rights often fell to the states that held them. Kaplan also credits Adams for foretelling the war on slavery, as Adams didn't seem to think too well of the southern states.

There certainly is much to gain from reading this book as the details are immense. I knew about the many treaties that Adams had worked on or had created, but I knew little about his married life to Louisa, and the children he had with her. Alcoholism seems to have been handed down via the genes.

Kaplan quotes endlessly from Adam's diary and prolific letters that he wrote to his parents, wife, children and close friends. His writings helped show Adams for the man he was: well-educated and determined to leave his children educated and well-rounded as well. Adam's career outside the White House was no less productive than his four years inside it. His time on earth certainly are full of our country's founding history.

Anyone who enjoys history will appreciate the research and time devoted to this work. The writing style is engrossing without being overburdened with scholarly rhetoric.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Biography, February 28, 2014
This review is from: John Quincy Adams: American Visionary (Hardcover)
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John Quincy Adams wasn't the warm and fuzzy type. Like his father, he was easily angered and had very strong opinions, many which rubbed his contemporaries the wrong way. Yes, he made mistakes and was a one term president, but this man hated slavery and was correct in many opinions he held. This book provides a good portrait of the president and how his views were ahead of his time. You can admire him from afar, and understand why he might have been intolerant of humankind.
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John Quincy Adams: American Visionary
John Quincy Adams: American Visionary by Fred Kaplan (Hardcover - May 6, 2014)
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