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Join the Conversation: How to Engage Marketing-Weary Consumers with the Power of Community, Dialogue, and Partnership Hardcover – October 19, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-0470137321 ISBN-10: 0470137320 Edition: 1st

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Join the Conversation: How to Engage Marketing-Weary Consumers with the Power of Community, Dialogue, and Partnership + Flip the Funnel: How to Use Existing Customers to Gain New Ones + Z.E.R.O.: Zero Paid Media as the New Marketing Model
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (October 19, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470137320
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470137321
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,333,288 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“The long and short of it is that the book is excellent…Jaffe deserves a place in Marketing history for this.” (SlightlyRoughAroundtheEdges.Wordpress.com, Tuesday 25th February 2008)

“In a series of case studies, Jaffe shows you how to bring your brand up to speed.” (Fin Week, Thursday 3rd April 2008)

From the Inside Flap

Throughout the history of advertising and marketing, communicating with consumers has been a one-way street. Marketers produced and disseminated messages and customers consumed them whether they liked them or not. Today, every person sees thousands of advertisements a day—and totally ignores the vast majority of them. Yet, companies still spend billions of dollars each year yelling at customers who don't want to hear it.

In this follow-up to his bestselling book, Life After the 30-Second Spot, author Joseph Jaffe explains how marketers must adapt to the brave new world of the Internet, social media and networking, consumer-generated content, blogs, and podcasts by joining the rich, deep, and meaningful customer conversations already in progress.

Consumers today are active participants in the advertising process, not silent targets and sitting ducks for one-way communication. Forget about the medium being the message; today, consumers are both the medium and the message. The future is bright for organizations that can join the ongoing dialog and leverage their customer relationships to build win-win situations for businesses, brands, and individuals. Through the power of community, dialog, and partnership, marketers finally have the power to talk with consumers rather than at them.

Traditional marketing is a red flag smart consumers can see from a mile away; an outdated idea lurching toward them with the same predictable exhortations and tired come-ons. They've had enough, and it's time to change the dynamic. When marketing is a conversation, marketers can get to know their consumers as individuals, not as silent members of a faceless demographic subsection. Join the Conversation uses real-world brands and companies, real case studies, and real conversations to reveal how to talk to customers—and how to get them talking about you.

It's time for marketing and marketers to become more meaningful and authentic, or they will both become obsolete. Totally practical and brilliantly revolutionary, Join the Conversation reveals the future of marketing and how you and your company can march boldly into it.

Join the conversation today at www.jointheconversation.us or through Jaffe's daily blog and podcast, Jaffe Juice (www.jaffejuice.com).


More About the Author

I'm not going to get cheesy, but I am going to direct you to a few related sites of interest. If you like me and/or the book, then you'll love these resources:

Jaffe Juice - my daily blog (www.jaffejuice.com) - don't forget to subscribe to the daily e-mail digest

Across the Sound - my New Marketing Podcast (www.acrossthesound.net) - you can listen ala carte or subscribe via iTunes or similar applications.

My corporate website is at www.getthejuice.com if you'd like to take the conversation "offline"

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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See all 18 customer reviews
This is an absolute MUST for anyone who works in Marketing or Advertising.
L. Roach
The book has good information, but it's hidden in between sophomoric humor, euphemism crammed sentences and a self-congratulatory tone.
Marketing Engagement
Jaffe makes the point that Orwell would have loved the subversive nature of this revolution - the new age of conversation.
Thomas Obrien

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Marketing Engagement on March 5, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I started reading Join the Conversation by Joseph Jaffe in December. It's now March and I've completed it. I usually pour through a book within a week or two, but this book was different. And not different in a good way. The book has good information, but it's hidden in between sophomoric humor, euphemism crammed sentences and a self-congratulatory tone. My advice - if you plan on reading this book start at chapter 18 (page 246). That's where the real information begins.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By David Cushman on March 20, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I'm one of a number of bloggers Joseph Jaffe has sent his latest book, Join The Conversation, for review purposes. I've posted about the wisdom of this strategy previously on http:fasterfuture.blogspot.com. And I enjoy Jaffe's blog enormously.

Jaffe obviously thinks deeply about the notion of human voice and its multiplied effect when the power of the network is applied. And on the vast majority of themes, on the whole big picture thing, Jaffe and I will agree whole-heartedly (after all the tagline 'Join the Conversation' has always been applied to my blog from the off!). He is one of us, he is riding the Cluetrain, he understands the power of the network etc etc.

So, all that said, it's the details that I might get picky about. And as a former sub-editor, even poor use of metaphor or lazy english ("pretty unique", for example) can set my pen a-twitching.
As a European reader, the many illustrative examples of good and bad practice from US mainstream media are often lost on me. That can grate a little. I read my copy on a beach in St Lucia - so checking the references on the web as I went along was out of the question.

But these are just details.

Provocative or patronising?
Jaffe seems deliberately provocative at times - and this can result in a patronising tone... (depending, naturally, on your point of view). It was a tone that often got me riled.
For example on page 172 he refers to the Worst Chase Scenario in which a union advertised in a New York paper asking for consumers' worst experiences at a particular bank. Jaffe writes that he was disappointed that it wasn't the bank itself asking the question (me too!).
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Craig Hordlow on April 13, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book has a wealth of good information. I want to begin by giving it credit there. Jaffe is a radical thinker and many of his more extreme ideas strike me as rather deluded and I wanted to bring them up before others potentially accept them as fact.

Jaffe contends that "shout" marketing will disappear. He is a huge advocate of 1 to 1 marketing. The conversation trend is certainly growing. In fact, this review is part of a conversation that helps consumers. But I am talking to you as another consumer, not a brand. If the brand were to join this conversation, it would be unwelcome.

What I don't think Jaffe understands is that the consumer does not want to have conversations with most brands. Look around you - at the products in your home. You can probably think of a "shout" (traditional) campaign for most of these brands. How many of them would you want to take the TIME to have conversations with? Not possible.

Jaffe accuses marketers of not knowing the individual (on page 14) and poses the question, "Do you know her name? Do you know what keeps her up at night?" as if (a) the consumer actually wants to talk individually with every (or even many) of the brands they buy, (2) the consumer wants you to know these kind of intimate details (what's next, asking when I first had sex?), and (3) the overhead of 1 to 1 marketing is not realistic for most companies.

The book has many examples like the one I cited above that make me think, "wow, this guy is blindly in love with the 'conversation' to the point that he WANTS to attack other forms of media." These attacks feel like political attacks - without merit, just to score a few points, and don't contribute in clarifying the real equilibrium of the different mediums.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Lippincott VINE VOICE on October 16, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I liked this book. It was basically simple, but it got a little wordy and longwinded. It was ALL about conversation as it relates to sales and marketing. It has the following 20 chapters:

1. Talking "at" versus talking "with"
2. The many-to-many model
3. Can marketing be a conversation?
4. The birth of Generation I
5. The rise of the prosumer
6. The new consumerism
7. The six Cs: Three phases of conversation
8. The consent-conversation relationship
9. What conversations are in your future?
10. Why are you so afraid of conversation?
11. The 10 tenets of good conversation
12. The 5 ways you can join the conversation
13. When conversation isn't a conversation at all
14. Where does conversation fit in?
15. Conversation through community
16. Conversation through dialog
17. Conversation through partnership
18. Getting started: The manifesto for experimentation
19. Does conversation work?
20. Do you speak conversation? Take the test

Back in 1999 and 2000 I took a job as a sales rep and my sales director was big on "relationship selling." He advocated contacting the prospect and shooten the crap with them on the first call. Then shoot a little less jibberish the second call and so on until the sixth call I was supposed to have developed a rapport with the prospect - a rapport that would eventually lead to a sale. Today marketing (in general) is grasping on to what can be called "relationship marketing." Build rapport with the target market one person at a time and hopefully make sales that way.

So how do you build rapport? That's kind of a dumb question - You build rapport through CONVERSATION. And this book is about conversation and how it relates to marketing.
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