Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Joining the Boston Tea Party (The Time-Traveling Twins) Hardcover – July 24, 2001


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$25.18 $0.13

Stick and Stone
Words do matter as Stick and Stone demonstrate in warm, rhyming text even the youngest reader will understand. See more featured books. Read more about the author Beth Ferry and the illustrator Tom Lichtenheld.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 10 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 5
  • Lexile Measure: 380L (What's this?)
  • Series: The Time-Traveling Twins
  • Hardcover: 48 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; 1st edition (July 24, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060270675
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060270674
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 0.4 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #468,000 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Diane Stanley's Time-Traveling Twins head for a second adventure in Joining the Boston Tea Party, illus. by Holly Berry. The date is 1773, and Liz, Lenny and Grandma hear Sam Adams speak and join the "Mohawks" in dumping tea into the Boston Harbor. Inviting illustrations as well as word balloons filled with humor ("I always thought tea came in little bags!") and information ("Women won't get to vote until 1920") should pull in aspiring historians.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Gr 1-4-Stanley's irrepressible Time-Traveling Twins embark on a new adventure, along with their grandmother and her dog, Moose. With the help of their spirited grandma and her magic hat, they are all transported back to colonial Boston to visit some ancestors and, dressed as Mohawks, the youngsters join in the excitement of the Boston Tea Party. Along with creating the drama of the rebellion, the author takes on the challenge of explaining its political and economic underpinnings using dialogue balloons to provide a sense of immediacy. The device is truly tested when the twins' colonial relatives chat about taxation without representation and other British abuses. However, although complex concepts are compressed, they are clearly presented in generally accessible vocabulary. Using a lighthearted cartoon style and an upbeat palette, Berry energizes the visual narrative with kinetic compositions and eye-catching perspectives. Her characters inhabit cozy, period interiors and roam Boston's quaint streets and harbor district. A large, simply presented map of the colonies and a comparison of aspects of daily life "then" and "now" decorate the endpapers. In addition, an author's note tells how the Sons of Liberty set in motion a series of events that ended with the founding of our nation. Young readers will enjoy the time travel, the colorful details of colonial life, and, of course, the derring-do of the Tea Party, while older readers will appreciate access to a humorous and painlessly informative introduction to an important chapter in American history.

Carey Ayres, formerly at Port Washington Public Library, NY

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Heather Hart on June 27, 2011
Format: Hardcover
In this book, the Time-Traveling twins journey back to Boston in 1773 to get a firsthand look at colonial life and experience the Boston Tea Party. This book is chalked full of historical facts and keeps kids interested. They really did cover life in colonial America in 1773 as well as they did the actual tea party. The author tried to weave in humor in the form of their talking pet dog, but it really just made it confusing and didn't seem to add to the story at all.

While it's easy to explain away the magic hat by saying that the author was just pretending, there were several other things that prevent me from recommending this book. #1 being that the boy calls his sister a `dummy' for asking a helpful question, and then putting her down further with his next comment. I found the mixture of block texts and speech balloons hard to follow. I wasn't sure where I was supposed to be reading at next, and reading them in the wrong order made absolutely no since. The twins also went with their ancestor without telling their grandmother (who was in charge) where they were going. In fact, they even mentioned not telling her, because she probably wouldn't want them to go. In the same conversation they mentioned the danger of what they were doing and that the penalty if they were caught was death. This upset my boys a great deal that someone would kill a child. We had to stop and re-explain that there weren't really kids involved and that this was just a pretend story about an actual event.

Overall, I think my favorite part of this book was the Author's note. It held tons of facts without the hard to read speech balloons or character flaws and fictional fluff getting in the way. If you are studying the revolutionary war and its surrounding events, there are tons of quality books out there; I highly recommend skipping this one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gerae Lindsey on May 3, 2006
Format: Hardcover
My kids (ages 6 and 7) both enjoyed me reading this book aloud. They learned alot by the end of the book about not only the Boston Tea Party but also what life was like for the colonists during the Revolutionary War period. Nice color pictures held my kids attention well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Nonfiction on February 18, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is a fairly cute intro to the Boston Tea Party for young elementary kids. I liked the basic premise of the story, the kids doing time travel with their grandmother was fun. It does include some humor which is nice in a children's history book. I was very glad to be reading it to a non-reader so that I could skip the boy calling his sister a dummy and the part about the risk of being put to death for treason. We luckily just grabbed this off a shelf at the library and I'll be happy to return it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By M. Heiss on August 23, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This book takes time travel and costume dress-up to the Boston Tea Party. It is cute and harmless, and it's memorable for kids. There is a GREAT map on the front end papers, and a fun comparison of colonial gear with present-day gear on the back end papers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.