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Josey Wales: Two Westerns : Gone to Texas/The Vengeance Trail of Josey Wales Paperback – August 1, 1989


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Josey Wales: Two Westerns : Gone to Texas/The Vengeance Trail of Josey Wales + Watch for Me on the Mountain + The Education of Little Tree
Price for all three: $41.24

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 431 pages
  • Publisher: University of New Mexico Press (August 1, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0826311687
  • ISBN-13: 978-0826311689
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (97 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #123,730 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Fresh and brutally convincing.” --Buffalo Evening News

From the Inside Flap

Josey Wales was the most wanted man in Texas. His wife and child had been lost to pre-civil War destruction and, like Jesse James and other young farmers, he joined the guerrilla soldiers of Missouri-men with no cause but survival and no purpose but revenge.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Very well written and entertaining read!
Charles M tressler
The Vengeance Trail of Josey Wales should have been made into a movie WITH the Clint Eastwood character.
Whitney O. Gardiner
I had not read the book until recently, and found the book as good as the movie.
Rommy M Henley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Matt Hetling on September 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
I don't think I'd ever read a pure Western before I picked this up, and I only got it because Carter's "The Education of Little Tree" is probably the best book I've ever read.

But Josey Wales turned me on to the genre, and I now have a little collection of Western novels, although none of them capture the life of a western gunslinger as brilliantly as Josey Wales does.

The two novels are bound together, with a short afterword by Lawrence Clayton.

Carter captures the culture of the outlaw in a way that allows us to see the context of the factors that created them. Josey Wales is, at his core, the same kind of homesteader as Pa Ingalls or the Joads family (from Little House on the Prairie and The Grapes of Wrath, respectively). But when a terrible deed brings his life down around his ears, he becomes driven by vengeance, and seeks justice against a hopelessly overwhelming enemy.

We also get an intimate look at the details of rugged trail life. Even better, we get to see some of the legion factors that crafty Wales uses to his advantage in order to maintain an edge over his opponents in a gunfight. Too many authors explain their gunmen heroes as being "the quickest draw." Wales is quick, to be sure, but he also knows enough to keep his horse fed on grain, and to engage in shootouts while the sun is at his back.

Both of these novels bring the reader on a journey through the American west that feels utterly real. The characters that we meet all have a life of their own that demonstrates the diversity of people who populated the region-- it was far more than cowboys and indians, after all.

If you're a fan of Westerns, I think that this has to be at the top of your list. If you're not a fan of Westerns, but just of great fiction, this is also a must-read.

Highly recommended.
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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Ronald E. Schramm on November 22, 1999
Format: Paperback
I have read and owned copies of one or the other, but not in the same volume. I found this medium an excellent way to continue reading about the characters. Forrest Carter does a splendid job of blending history with fiction. His historical research is top notch. I highly recommend this novel for the student of history, as well as the casual western reader.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful By "readwest" on March 31, 2000
Format: Paperback
The end of the American Civil War has long been the point of beginning for several Western adventures, but GONE TO TEXAS (AKA OUTLAW JOSEY WALES) is one the reader will never forget. His wife and son murdered by the notorious Red Legs, Josey Wales sets out to seek his revenge by joining a force of Missouri rebels. When his band is forced to surrender, Josey holds back only to watch his entire clan executed. The only one left, Josey is now an outlaw, on the run and headed southwest. Joining him are an elderly Cherokee, a Navajo squaw whom Josey rescues from two rapists, a red bone coonhound, and eventually a family from Kansas who nearly lose it all to a band of Comancheros. Together they fight for each other's lives, whether it be with the Union forces on Josey's trail, or the Comanche that rule the land they now pass, all in the search for peace. GONE TO TEXAS is a story for all times.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By gunman42782 on December 7, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I think the Outlaw Josey Wales is one of the best movies ever. So I read the book it is based on (Gone to Texas), and if anything it is even better than the movie. There are just enough differences to make it interesting, while enough alike to make you cheer! The second book, THe Vengence Trail of Josey Wales, was a little less readable, but good nevertheless. A bit more violent and bloody too. IF you like westerns, you will love this book. I highly recommend it!
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81 of 104 people found the following review helpful By Grant Waara VINE VOICE on September 10, 2003
Format: Paperback
To start off with, the author's real name is: Asa Earl Carter. Carter was known to be a racist. He was with George Wallace and left him when Wallace began to change his views. He wrote "Outlaw Josey Wales" (It's first title was: 'The Rebel Outlaw: Josey Wales,") and was printed by an obscure publisher in Alabama. He sent a copy to Clint Eastwood, hoping that he might be interested in securing the film rights. What happened was that producer Robert Daley got it instead and then one weekend, having nothing to read, he saw Carter's book and decided to read it. He read it in one sitting. Then Eastwood read it. They met Carter to negotiate the rights. Carter showed up to the meeting drunk.
Despite Carter's myriad of character flaws, this can be certainly said: the man could write. "Outlaw Josey Wales" is one of the best westerns I've ever read. It's a fast moving tale, packed with action and incident. The movie follows the story quite faithfully (though the timeline is compressed) and Eastwood made at least my favorite of all of his westerns (yes, I think it's better than "Unforgiven).
Back to the book. I can't speak for the politics of the book. Yes, if you're aren't a fan of big government, I suppose this book will speak to you. But if you've ever lost all that mattered to you, if you've been left with nothing, then this book will speak to you. That's where the book's genius truly lies. It struck a universal note, not just some political rambling. That's why I think Mr. Daley and Eastwood were so taken with it. When the book begins, Josey has nothing to live for and thus lives a life of vengeance; but as the book ends, he truly has something to live for, and he sees how hollow vengeance truly is.
A great western. A great book.
How the heck did Carter do it?
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