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Journalism After September 11 (Communication and Society) Paperback – September 8, 2002

ISBN-13: 978-0415288002 ISBN-10: 0415288002
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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

9/11 This timely and important book addresses several questions facing journalists and their profession in the wake of last year's tragedy: How do journalists fairly and accurately present the news in a climate of uncertainty and fear? What is the role of the press in a democratic society? How do journalists preserve their professional ethics while experiencing a traumatic event affecting them personally? The editors of this collection of scholarly and authoritative essays, academics Zelizer (Univ. of Pennsylvania; Visual Culture and the Holocaust) and Allan (Univ. of West of England; Theorizing Culture), have synthesized a thoughtful and engaging examination of the effects of 9/11 on the field of journalism. Its unique aim is to discuss the impact of the attack as a personal trauma and its current and future effects on journalism and reporting of the news. Contributors include scholars and media commentators from all over the world, with each essay including a list of references used. Highly recommended for academic libraries. Katherine E. Merrill, Rochester P.L., NY
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

FIRST EDITION:

'Media critics will appreciate this book, which examines how 9/11 has reshaped modern journalism.' - Bookmagazine.com

'Media Studies is good for you. This collection of essays comes mainly from academics but nobody should bridle at theorists lecturing practitioners. They properly challenge the way September 11th was reported - in a way that's both an endorsement of the role of the media and a wake-up call on its failures . . . anyone interested in our trade should read it.' - Roger Mosey, Ariel

'A thoughtful and engaging examination of the effects of 9/11 on the field of journalism. Its unique aim is to discuss the impact of the attack as a personal trauma and its current and future effects on journalism and the reporting of the news. . . highly recommended.' - Library Journal

' ... the book serves as a useful platform from which to launch future analysis of a tragedy that - even critics of imperialistic American foreign policy would admit - changed the world a great deal.' - Discourse and Society

'This is not a book just for journalists but for everyone concerned about democracy, freedom of speech and our future. Distinguished contributors from all over the English-speaking world tackle the crucial question: what did the media's reaction to 11 September tell us about modern media itself? All the ideological assumptions-voluntary censorship, market logic, journalistic patriotism, big corporation dominance - are dissected and those that do not stand up are ruthlessly buried. Is this important? Of course it is. As Victor Navasky reminds us in his introduction: it is based largely on journalism that a nation makes up its mind.' - Phillip Knightley, author of The First Casualty

'The best critique yet of how the media responded to September 11 2001. An eclectic group of seasoned media operatives offer real insight into the challenges, compromises, successes and failures of the coverage that flowed from the attack on the Twin Towers in New York.' - Jon Snow, Channel 4 News

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Product Details

  • Series: Communication and Society
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (September 8, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415288002
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415288002
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,325,498 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on January 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
This profile of both journalism and events after September 11th provides a blend of social history and a survey of how journalism's classic structure was shaken by the events of September 11th. Ideological beliefs flourished after the tragedy and ultimate transformed the nature and content of journalistic reporting. Journalism After September 11th packs in a host of internationally respected journalists and academics who probe the face of modern journalism and its many challenges.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ivan Boothe on March 12, 2008
Format: Paperback
Many Americans seem to have a peculiar sense of dualism about themselves, a feeling at once slightly elitist and fiercely victimized. The United States attempts to be the great savior of the world, but is cast off by many other nations, and it is from this so many Americans draw both superiority and resentment. While U.S. citizens have much to be proud of, so many seem to be neurotically opposed to admitting any shortcomings, and it is this arrogance--not, as is so often cited, hatred of American culture or freedom--that is a primary source of a bias against the United States from Sweden to Somalia. Two phrases plastered across American newspapers a year ago demonstrate this bipolar affliction: "Everything has changed" and "Why do they hate us?" Only Americans could claim that their indeed heart-wrenching loss of 3,000 lives had superseded every other such atrocity the world over, yet simultaneously sequester themselves with a flippant "us."

U.S. newspapers and their journalists were dramatically affected by Sept. 11. From the instant iconicity of "9/11" (a date so beautifully Ameri-centric) to the violent and sudden loss of any pretense of objectivity, American journalism is in not in the same state today as it has very recently been.

Chronicling the myriad shifts over the past year, Journalism After September 11 takes a hard, academic look at nearly every aspect of journalism--structure, stereotypes, objectivity, conglomeration, globalization, patriotic journalism, risks to reporters' health, tabloids (both American and British), talk shows, online media, and photography. All of the writers included are from the world of academia, and it shows in a few of the chapters, which dive headlong into obscure sociology.
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