Engineering & Transportation
Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by B. R. Media
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for supersaver and Amazon Prime shipping. Buy with confidence! This is a EX LIBRARY book, stickers and markings accordingly. Eligible for supersaver and Amazon Prime shipping. Buy with confidence! Item is in good condition. All pages are intact, and the cover is intact (including dust cover). The spine may show signs of wear. Item is in good condition.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Journey Beyond Selene: Remarkable Expeditions Past Our Moon and to the Ends of the Solar System Hardcover – July 20, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0684847658 ISBN-10: 0684847655

Used
Price: $4.00
19 New from $3.79 54 Used from $0.01 4 Collectible from $9.88
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$3.79 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.


Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (July 20, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684847655
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684847658
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,499,246 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Earth's moon, called Selene by the Greeks, is a gray, lifeless place, interesting geologically but perhaps a little disappointing to those of us looking for strange, colorful new worlds. But our moon is only one of more than 60 planetary satellites in the solar system, most of which are entirely unexplored. In Journey Beyond Selene, Jeffrey Kluger chronicles these unsung places and the heroes who explore them: the Jet Propulsion Lab's staff of dedicated adventurers, who build and fly sleek, unmanned spacecraft to investigate other moons. "When astronauts finally did reach the moon," Kluger writes, "the lean, fleet ships of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory had already gone elsewhere."

Why explore the satellites of other planets when the planets themselves remain mysterious? Kluger describes astronomers' first realization that in contrast to the lifeless gas giant Jupiter, its moons were a veritable scientific playground:

There were big moons and small moons, patterned moons and plain moons, brightly colored moons and pasty-pale moons.... There were moons that could have atmospheres, water, and even, perhaps, a spark of internal heat. Put them together, and you had moons that could, in theory, harbor life.

Journey Beyond Selene chronicles the history of a little-understood aspect of humanity's quest to discover new worlds. From the early Ranger orbiters through the incredible journeys of Voyager and Galileo, Kluger gives credit where credit is long overdue. They may not be astronauts, but these space jockeys have the right stuff. --Therese Littleton

From Publishers Weekly

Unmanned spaceships have investigated all the planets in our solar system except Pluto. More significant to NASA's search for extraterrestrial life, these spaceships have also beamed back vivid closeups of 63 moons. For it is on moons like Jupiter's ice-covered satellite Europa that scientists believe we may discover primitive forms of life. Kluger, a writer for Time magazine and coauthor of the bestselling Lost Moon, does a terrific job of tracing the history of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, whose scientists have directed the unmanned exploration of space from the first failed attempts to land on earth's moon (Selene) to the Pioneer and Voyager missions that captured the public's imagination with their color photos of giant gas planets and bizarre moons. Kluger wisely doesn't dwell on the bureaucracy and infighting always present in an institution as large as JPL, but he does portray enough of it for readers to appreciate how pressured the staff were to produce a spacecraft that could reach the moon and send back pictures. Kluger's explanations of the technical hurdles faced in guiding a tiny spaceship close to as many planets as possible without either hitting them or being set off course by their gravity can be followed easily by anyone with a general science background. His descriptions of our small galactic neighborhood convey scientists' excitement about what we may find when a probe lands on one of these strange worlds. An enticing narrative of scientific exploration, this book is strongly recommended to anyone interested in the search for life in space. 8-page color insert. Agent, Joy Harris. (July)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A. Leslie on August 4, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book focuses entirely on unmanned missions and all the human participants are entirely earth-based, so you might imagine that the story could be quite dry and clinical but Jeffrey Kluger brings the story to life in a most engaging and entertaining way. This book is a real page-turner -- you'll feel compelled to read it from cover-to-cover in one sitting! He brings the characters to life and the long cast involved on some of these amazingly longlived missions. It's a fascinating story with lots of amazing facts that I never knew before the read. And, it's an even better read than "The Race" which has garnered a lot of praise and also a very good book in its own right.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By DH on May 22, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I think most people remotely interested in astronomy will find Kluger's book a worthwhile and informative read. Unmanned space flight is the poor cousin to human exploration of space but the story behind JPL's many probes sent into space is fascinating. Those not interested in space may find the book hard going. The end result however, is a greater understanding of the planetary bodies in our solar system and some of the men behind our greatest astronomical discoveries. The book would have merited five stars had Mr Klugar included more photographs and diagrams.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kevin W. Parker on August 26, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is a lively, often anecdotal account of many of the lunar and planetary missions developed by NASA/Cal Tech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The prologue in particular is overdramatic, but fortunately it settles down after that. The focus is on two projects: JPL's first program, the Ranger lunar missions, and the spectacular Voyager missions to the outer planets. The latter in particular is covered with great thoroughness from program conception to the final flyby, and beyond. It provides some interesting insight into the politics and pragmatism behind these great adventures.
If I have a criticism of this book, it's a simple one: there aren't enough pictures. There are only eight pages worth of color pictures, which isn't enough to do justice even to the Voyager missions. I can only think it was a misguided attempt to save costs.
Overall, though, it's an easy (for this space buff, anyway) and fascinating read about some of the most significant unmanned projects of the space age so far.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Alex R. Blackwell on November 22, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Kluger delivers an absorbing narrative of selected unmanned space exploration missions conducted by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. While avoiding arcane technical descriptions, which would be mind numbing to most of the public, he takes the middle ground, weaving personal vignettes with an above average description of the scientific and engineering details. However, his true gift is apparent in his personal description of some of the unsung heroes who made this journey possible. The reader is introduced to individuals like William Pickering, Bill O'Neil, John Casani, and Linda Morabito, just to name a few. These people, who are all but unknown to the public, and their remarkable spacecraft deserve their moment in the spotlight. However, as former JPL Director Dr. Bruce Murray once wrote, "there are no parades for robots." Perhaps, this book will be their march of glory.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again