Industrial-Sized Deals Best Books of the Month Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums Storm Fire TV Stick Grocery Find the Best Purina Pro Plan for Your Pet Shop Popular Services Home Theater Setup Plumbing Services Assembly Services Shop all tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Fire HD Kids Edition Kindle Voyage The Walking Dead\ Gear Up for Football Deal of the Day

Journey to the Center of an Egg

April 20, 2007 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:40
30
2
2:50
30
3
5:51
30
4
11:16
30
5
13:33
30
6
7:30
30
7
3:21
30
8
4:20
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: April 20, 2007
  • Release Date: April 20, 2007
  • Label: ENJA RECORDS Matthias Winckelmann
  • Copyright: ENJA RECORDS Matthias Winckelmann GmbH
  • Total Length: 52:21
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0011YAFFE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #872,238 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By James Lamperetta on February 16, 2007
Format: Audio CD
The oud is a small, pear-shaped stringed instrument that dates back about 5,000 years. It is widely considered to be a precursor of the English lute. It is fretless and typically has 11 strings, 10 of which are paired in courses of two.

In the jazz world, the oud has had precious few full-time practitioners. For most listeners, exposure to the instrument in the genre has likely been when it is used for effect or coloration.

Rabih Abou-Khalil is noteworthy as a stylist who has straddled the instrument's indigenous Middle Eastern world music and jazz to create an exotic musical hybrid.

"Journey to the Centre of an Egg" is Abou-Khalil's 11th disc for Justin Time and the first to feature him in the company of a pianist- Joachim Kuhn.

Boasting a strong jazz pedigree, Kuhn proves to be an enlightened choice. Equally adept at playing Bach as he is at free-jazz, this combination of breadth in style and ability serves as a primary catalyst for Abou-Khalil's latest exploration of fresh terrain as he continues to be unencumbered by the confines of arbitrary boundaries.

The duo shares songwriting credits for the disc's eight tunes, the centerpiece of which is the mid-disc pair of "I'm Better of Without You" and "Notwasheh and Kadwasheh," which clock in at 11 and 13 minutes respectively.

The former opens with a flourish of vintage Kuhn before giving way to an extended passage that matches Abou-Khalil with just the accompaniment of drummer Jarrod Cagwin.

The latter tune ebbs and flows as it traverses a broad emotional and artistic expanse and includes the additional rhythmic pulse of a second drummer as well as alto saxophone solo from Kuhn.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Scott Williams on February 2, 2008
Format: MP3 Music
What makes this album unique amongst Rabih Abou Khalil CDs is that this CD features a trio. Rabih's specialty is his ability to weave many instrumental parts into a beautiful Middle Eastern song. On most of Rabih's albums there are a fair 7-8 musicians and often Rabih's oud playing is not the focus. Here with just three musicians, Rabih's oud playing and improvisational skills take the forefront. I would not recommend this as someone's first Khalil CD, as your first experience of this master should be one where he uses his masterful arrangement skills (Blue Camel, Arabian Waltz, Sultan's Picnic). However, once you have acquired those CDs you will find another side of Rabih here. This album features some of the tightest improvisation of any Rabih CDs. The pianist, Kuhn, is masterful and pushes Rabih in new directions. As with all Rabih CDs there is masterful frame drum play to tie it all together.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ronald Gold on July 29, 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
One marvelous thing about Rabih Abou-Khalil is his refusal to pigeonhole himself. That's why each of his recordings features another cast of characters, people whose signature style is what he wants to explore at the time. Here he teams up with Joachim Kuhn, a classically trained pianist who aims for a fusion of Keith Jarrett and Thelonious Monk. Hear a section where Khalil wants to revert to a rhythm from his Middle Eastern roots -- and, after Kuhn pulls him away from it, never tries to return. He adjusts his oud to a more detached, bass-oriented approach than usual, and there are passages of extreme beauty where the two soloists play notes so close to each other that it sounds like a single instrument. Drummer Jarrod Cagwin is totally on the same wavelength.

Kuhn's piano is tinnier than the ordinary concert grand, and I looked at the album notes to see what it was. Here's what I found: "Rabih Abou-Khalil plays Hannabach Gold Strings. Jarrod Cagwin plays Ackermann frame drums. Joachim Kuhn uses Odol mouth freshner."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. TIMMERMAN on December 12, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I'm a big Rabih Abou-Khalil fan and I'm always impressed with the musos he gets into the studio, and the amazing interaction that occurs. Pity I'm not a Joachim Kuhn fan, and I can't say this is one of Rabih's best. There are some good moments, like "Die Brucke" which chugs along nicely, but otherwise it sounds like two musicians having a jam one afternoon to pass the time, without getting especially inspired. Meandering and rather meaningless, which in my opinion could be Kuhn's fault. "Blue Camel", just to mention one better album that quickly springs to mind, walks all over this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again