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Journey of Hope: The Back-to-Africa Movement in Arkansas in the Late 1800s (The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture) Paperback – Bargain Price, September 1, 2004


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Product Details

  • Series: The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press (September 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807855502
  • ASIN: B003GAN2V0
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,833,849 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A welcome addition to scholarship in Arkansas, African American, and southern history. . . . Highly recommended."
-- Choice

"This is a serious work of scholarship. Barnes should be commended for meticulously and analytically treating a painful but important aspect of Liberian-American relations."
-- American Historical Review

"Drawing upon an impressive trove of primary and secondary materials. . . . Barnes demonstrates his skill and sensitivity as a thoughtful historian. . . . [A] substantive history. Meticulously researched and clearly written."
History

"A poignant portrait of the overlooked back-to-Africa movement in the American South."
— W. Fitzhugh Brundage, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, editor of Booker T. Washington and Black Progress

"Anyone interested in the lives of poor black men and women will find this a compelling read."
— James H. Meriwether, author of Proudly We Can Be Africans: Black Americans and Africa, 1935-1961

Review

Journey of Hope is a poignant portrait of the overlooked back-to-Africa movement in the American South. More than just a searing indictment of late-nineteenth-century American racism, this book provides a deeply researched and sensitive account of the courage, naivete, and desperation of those blacks who believed that they could only enjoy the fullness of freedom in Africa.--W. Fitzhugh Brundage, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lionel S. Taylor on December 31, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is a very readable book on the back to Africa movement and how it played out in Arkansas in particular.The Author does a execellent job of explainig the history of the movement along with the motivation of the poeple who wanted to go and those that wanted to help them go. While this book focuses on Arkansas the conditions in it were the conditions for many Blacks in the aftermath of Reconstruction. It is this fact that gives the book a universal appeal This is a must read for anyone intrested in American history immediatly after reconstruction or the Back to Africa movement.
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Format: Paperback
Outstanding book covering the little-known story of African-Americans emigrating from Arkansas to Liberia. During the late nineteenth century, more black people went to Liberia from Arkansas than any other state. Barnes present a well-written, extensively documented account that also discusses the factors driving African-Americans in Arkansas to choose Liberia when the back-to-Africa movement had mostly died out elsewhere. While hucksters were selling false promises of diamonds lying on the ground and bread and butter hanging from trees, white planters were determined to keep black people from leaving because they were valuable as laborers and share croppers. Many black intellectuals saw Liberia as an opportunity to have true freedom from oppression, while others felt that leaving was cowardly and largely done out of ignorance or greed. Essential for anyone interested in the history of Liberia, or African-American history in general.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Laurence Daley on February 24, 2013
Format: Paperback
Vessels Laurada and Horsa were Part of Two Roads to attempt to Reach Freedom

Barnes, Kenneth C. 2005 Journey of Hope: The Back-To-Africa Movement in Arkansas in the Late 1800s (Google eBook). University of North Carolina Press books.google.com/books?isbn=0807876224

My intent was to follow the expeditions to free Cuba from Spain, and thus the vessels Horsa and especially the Laurada came to my attention via computer searches. It was a surprise to learn that both vessels had also served in the Back to Africa Movement.

"page 135 `...in fact, about half of all known emigrants to Liberia from Arkansas traveled on the two large IMS-sponsored expeditions aboard the his Horsa and Laurada in 1895 and 1896. The Laurada's voyage of March 1896 would transport the last boatload of American settlers to the Liberian Republic."

Perhaps there are some who do not know about the role these ships played in driving the Spanish out of Cuba.

Gibraltar is on the edge of the sea currents that wash towards the northwestern coast of Africa, however after passing the Canary Island the currents ride towards the Caribbean and thus to Cuba. Thus I wanted to know (for book in progress Love and War in Cuba") which group of freedom seekers was the Laurada carrying at that time it stopped there.

This book, Journey of Hope: answered my question (see above citation)

However, there was racial component to this voyage too. The Spanish government was doing everything in its power to stop the Cubans from achieving freedom. These Spanish efforts included trying to drive a wedge between white and black in the Cuban Mambi army.

In this the New York Times played an unfortunate propaganda role.
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