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Comment: Good - Book is in good overall condition. The covers are intact with some slight wear. The dust jacket, if applicable, is intact with some slight wear. The spine has creasing. Pages may include limited notes, folds and highlighting. The "Head", "Tail" and
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Journey Proud Paperback – February 28, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 442 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (February 28, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1479254665
  • ISBN-13: 978-1479254668
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 4.9 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,124,314 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Kirkus Reviews

"This fictional account of children growing up in a rural Southern town  during the civil rights movement illustrates how childhood innocence is  often the collateral damage of social injustice. Twelve-year-old Annie  Mackey and her friends Buck, Twig and Briddy spend carefree days in the  strong limbs of the favorite climbing tree they've named Old Lady. The tree  provides the stability they seek, as each of their lives begins to change in  confusing, unmanageable ways. Among the friends, the author orchestrates  rhythmic dialogue with a keen sense of the regional dialect that matches the  intellectual capabilities of adolescents faced with adult problems. Annie's  mother suffers a nervous breakdown after the unexpected death of Annie's  brother; Will; Buck is bullied and humiliated by his older brother; and  siblings Twig and Briddy attempt to realize their dreams despite the  obstacles of religion and social mores. With perspicacious guidance of the  Mackey's housekeeper, Naomi, the children begin to form their identities in  a community that struggles to reconcile its values with its actions and  laws. Amid race relations and a battle for women's rights, the realistic  characters inhabit a rich setting.An engaging, entertaining story with  memorable characters."

About the Author

Salley McAden McInerney is a journalist, freelance writer and former columnist for the Anderson (S.C.) Independent-Mail, the Gwinnett (Atlanta, Ga.) Daily News, The Columbia (S.C.) Record and The State (Columbia, S.C.) newspapers. Ms. McInerney's columns and stories have won many journalism awards, including a national "Best of Scripps Award" for feature writing in 2006; the National Newspaper Association's "Best Spot News Story" for 1992; and the Georgia Associated Press's "Story of the Year" for 2008. Ms. McInerney has also won many Georgia and South Carolina Press Association awards, including the 2002 Georgia Press Association's "Joe Parham Trophy for Humorous Columns," the 1988 South Carolina Press Associaton's "Judson Chapman Award," the 1987 South Carolina Press Association's first-place award for feature writing, and the 2005 South Carolina Press Association's first-place award for column writing. In 1989, while at The State, Ms. McInerney was a contributing columnist to a series of stories about Hurricane Hugo, which was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize in General News Reporting. Ms. McInerney is a 1978 graduate of the University of the South (Sewanee, Tennessee) and was invited to attend the Sewanee Writers' Conference in 2004, studying fiction writing with novelists Jill McCorkle and Richard Bausch. In 1988, while at The State, Ms. McInerney trained under the tutelage of Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Kathleen Parker. Ms. McInerney was raised in Columbia, S.C. She and her husband, Michael, live on Lake Hartwell, in northeast Georgia. They have two children - Ann Skipper Ballenger and Michael "Mac" McInerney; three dogs - Boo, Cricket and Baby; and two cats, Lucy and Sophie. Journey Proud is Ms. McInerney's first novel.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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See all 31 customer reviews
It is beautifully written.
Janet Schell
I read this book in 2 days...really could not put it down.
deborah moore
What a trip down memory lane!
G. Cauthen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Janet Schell on March 9, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Decided to preview while I finished my coffee this morning. Could not put it down. Journey Proud made me laugh and made me cry. It brought back memories, both good and bad. It is beautifully written.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lee M. Robinson on March 3, 2013
Format: Paperback
McInerney does a masterful job of bringing the reader into the turbulent world of the sixties with her careful rendering of characters and her tender evocation of place. You will love this book!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By GailD on April 16, 2013
Format: Paperback
I loved this book. I couldn't put it down. Being a Southern gal, I so appreciated the characters, settings and dialog. It struck just the right notes. I felt like I wanted to wrap my arms around the grand old tree and protect it myself. There is nothing like a beautiful Southern live oak.
The story was heartfelt and authentic. Salley is a wonderful writer. I hope she continues this journey soon.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Edmund Robinson on April 16, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Disclosure: I was married to the author's sister for 27 years and have known her since early childhood. Journey Proud is a sensitive exploration of a Southern milieu. The central character is an ancient live oak, one of those gargantuan moss-draped sentinels of the southern landscape, and the impelling force of the narrative is the role this tree plays in the lives of the protagonists over several decades. We meet the children who played in her branches, which became a real refuge from their chaotic and loveless home lives. We meet the strong African American maid who became a substitute mother to many of the children, and who plays a surprising role in the workings of grace at the end of the story. The story is told with verve and is very clever in its revelations, keeping the reader engaged and guessing until the very end. Its a mystery, a memoir, a political manifesto, a salvation story and a cracking good read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By suegas on March 29, 2013
Format: Paperback
If you loved The Help you will love Journey Proud. Salley took me back to my "60"s childhood. I smile as I remember my pack of friends going off on a day of adventure. We shared secrets, the 1st stirrings of romance and a strong sense of loyalty and camaraderie. Salley captures the blissful innocence of kids on the cusp of being young adults. She also captures them as they try to navigate the issues of the day....challenging home lives, integration and race riots, forbidden love, the death of a president. This trip down memory lane is intertwined with a page turning story that grips you in the opening pages and holds you till the very end. Bravo Salley!!!!!!
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By Deborah C Seay on January 22, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Journey Proud is a great read! It's real life about growing up in the 50's and 60's. McInerney does an excellent job involving the reader in the life of each character, bringing to life the turbulence of the times and the confusion it caused. This book touches all emotions as memories come pouring back. This is a sweet story of growing up with best friends, memorable adventures in special places and the events that bind them together for life through hard lessons learned as innocence is shattered. I hated for it to end!
Waiting on the next one, Sal!
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Format: Paperback
"Journey Proud" is an unlikely expression. It may be a southern expression, but I've never heard it, and I grew up with Salley in South Carolina, spending countless hours on the farm that is the primary setting for this book.

I also worked for her father, who taught me - through osmosis and through his very opinionated direction - that there is one best word for every circumstance (and probably not a big, complicated word), the same lesson he apparently taught Salley, as she has mastered the craft, and produced a masterful and evocative set of just the right best words.

In its simplest form, "Journey Proud" is a story about any young person's journey, and any mother's pride. However, their intersection in this very compelling story is intricately woven and the relation to the expression is completely unexpected, and the reader is pushed and pulled through each page ever closer to that nexus ... and the wonderful conclusion.

For me, this was a great five hour Christmas Day read ... I can't imagine a better way to have spent the day, and though clearly biased and personal, I couldn't recommend this book more highly!
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By McLaurin on December 8, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
It’s nice to have friends who write books. One, it’s nice to have friends who are clever enough to write books and, two, it gives you a chance to say nice things about them if their books are good.
It is taxing, however, when two of them have books released within weeks of each other. Such is the case here.
Monte Dutton, one of my old chums from a lifetime ago when we both covered NASCAR racing for different newspapers in the Carolinas, recently had his second novel, “The Intangibles,” published.
Salley McInerny, a colleague from the old days when we both toiled in the same newsroom at The State newspaper in Columbia, SC, had her first novel, “Journey Proud,” hit the bookshelves at almost the same time as Monte’s.
Monte and I exchange e-mails often, and have great fun writing snarky retorts to each other’s Facebook postings, so I had a pretty good idea what his book was about. I knew only in general terms what Salley’s was about, but the more information I got, the more it sounded like she and Monte had written about the same thing.
So I figured I’d wait until I’d read them both and then do the old high school English “compare and contrast” review of both. A two-fer.
Here’s the taxing part: Both wrote excellent books about growing up in the South in the 1960s, but the stories are so different that it would take a review about the length of both novels to make sense of a comparison.
Both books are about how black people and white people who occupied the same territory for 200 years struggle to find common ground when desegregation forced them together in ways they’d never anticipated.
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