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Joy of Cooking Hardcover – October 31, 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1152 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner; anniversary edition (October 31, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743246268
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743246262
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 7.2 x 2.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (642 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,148 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

The much anticipated 75th anniversary edition of Irma Rombauer's kitchen classic Joy of Cooking promises to be as indispensable as past editions of this generational favorite. In addition to hundreds of brand-new recipes, this Joy is filled with many recipes from all previous editions, retested and reinvented for today's tastes.

Take the new Joy for a test-run in the kitchen with these featured recipes for Roast Brined Turkey and Apple Pie, and watch a video demonstration for their recipe for 10-in-One Cookies. And read on for celebrity chef "Odes to Joy," Joy timeline, and Joy trivia.



Odes to Joy


"Great cookbooks are not just collections of interesting recipes. They are, first and foremost, books that tell a story, the story of how people lived and cooked at a particular point in time. They reveal, to borrow an expression from James Beard, their delights and prejudices, their view of the social order, their appetite for serving others food that meets the expectations of their social class. Food can be anything and everything from fuel to an object of intellectual curiosity to full-bore hedonism that transports the mind and body far from the dinner table with just one overwhelming bite.

I started cooking out of an early edition of Joy when I was only 7 years old. I remember making a basic chocolate cake with 7-minute frosting. The cake turned out fine, but the frosting resembled gruel and was my introduction to the importance of following a recipe to the letter. Evidently my lack of patience and precision had led me astray. But after that first brush with culinary failure, Joy led me to many, many successes over the years; more to the point, I became enamored of Ms. Rombauer's voice, the matter-of-fact charm that led her to suggest "stand facing the stove" as a sensible first step in any recipe.

The amateur but highly evolved enthusiasm that Irma Rombauer brought to the world of home cooking was a breath of fresh air after the slightly earlier era of culinary dowagers Fannie Farmer, Mrs. Beaton, and Marion Harland. To those pillars of culinary wisdom, recipes were shorthand for cooks who had spent a lifetime in the kitchen. A pie pastry recipe might be written as "make a paste." But Ms. Rombauer was there to hold our hands, to put food in a social context and give it attitude, energy, and meaning in a world where food was leaping past the narrow formality of the Victorian age.

For all of our worldly knowledge about ingredients and culinary custom, few cookbook authors have managed to perfectly capture, without artifice or self-conscious chatter, the vernacular of an age. Irma Rombauer introduced us to a room in our home--the kitchen--that was to become a place of enjoyment, not just one of backbreaking labor. She represented the essence of the new American experience, which suggested that everything in life could be transformed into pleasure with nothing more than the proper attitude. And what better way to celebrate this new age than to have a smashing cocktail party with the perfect hors d’oeuvres?

The original Joy of Cooking was mind over matter, the perfect mix of attitude and function. Even as times have changed, the Joy stands out as a watershed volume, a book that speaks to the very heart of who we want to be in the kitchen: producers of our own story, directors of the good American life.

And, according to Ms. Rombauer, all we have to do is take that first easy step and "stand facing the stove." --Christopher Kimball, founder and editor of Cook's Illustrated

"I'm often asked to pick my favorite cookbook. Considering that there are over 3,000 cookbooks published each year, it's a daunting task to try to narrow them down. Speaking as a chef who never went to cooking school, I've been enthralled by certain cookbooks, immersing myself from cover to cover and learning about exotic cuisines from all over the world. But for just plain basic information, both the original and revised Joy of Cooking are still my bibles. I can't tell you how many times my wife Jackie and I have thumbed through the stained and broken-backed copy of Joy in our home kitchen, looking for our favorite angel food cake recipe, our favorite skillet corn bread, our favorite fluffy biscuits, and crisp waffles, and on and on. It's tough to picture my family table--or, in fact, the American table--without a well-worn copy of Joy of Cooking in the background." " --Tom Douglas, author of I Love Crab Cakes!

"I highly recommend this book as a must-have in your kitchen. Chock full of great information, this book takes all of the guess work out and leaves no stone unturned." --Paula Deen, author of Paula Deen Celebrates!






"In our kitchen, Joy of Cooking is a tool as indispensable as the chef's knife, the scale, the whisk. We actually own two copies--a shelf-copy for reading, and one whose sauce-splattered, dog-eared pages bear witness to just how much joy we get from Joy." " --Matt Lee and Ted Lee, authors of The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook





"Joy of Cooking is the ultimate reference guide that I have been using for years. It's timeless and packed with perfect recipes for the home cook that stands up to the test of time." --Tyler Florence, author of Tyler's Ultimate






"Joy of Cooking is a book I turn to whenever I have a question about food or cooking. The new edition is the combined effort of some of the best cooks writing today; I know I can trust its information. And trust is, to my mind, the essential quality of all great cookbooks." --Sally Schneider, author of The Improvisational Cook






"When Andrew first contemplated becoming a chef in the 1980s, he asked two Boston chefs of his acquaintance what books he should read. Each independently recommended Joy of Cooking as THE classic with reliable recipes for just about everything. (The second chef urged him to look for an early copy for the sheer entertainment value of reading how to cook a possum.) A decade later, when we interviewed 60 of America’s leading chefs for our first book Becoming a Chef, we asked them the same question--and again Joy was one of their five most recommended books. In fact, we recommend buying two copies, like we did: we keep our chocolate-smudged copy of Joy in our kitchen, and a reading copy on our bookshelves." --Andrew Dorenburg and Karen Page, authors of What to Drink with What You Eat


"Our Joy of Cooking is dog-eared, flour dusted, chocolate smudged, oil spattered, and easily the most used cookbook on the shelf. The staggering amount of information in the book taught us the basics when we were in our teens and has informed our cooking for the decades since. We wish we had written it!" --Johanne Killeen and George Germon, authors of On Top of Spaghetti




"I received a copy of Joy of Cooking in my late teens. I have treasured the cookbook ever since and still use it frequently as a reference. In the late 80's I was asked to represent American Cooking in Italy. I cooked all over the country for 2 months. The only book I took was Joy of Cooking. When ingredients that I had ordered did not show up and I had to totally wing it, I used this book to get me out of a few jams--like what the proportions are to make your own baking powder! If I could have only one cookbook--other than my own of course!--it would be Joy of Cooking–-as it is the bible of American cooking" --Kathy Casey, author of Kathy Casey's Northwest Table


"I have purchased Joy of Cooking for all my restaurant libraries as well as my own. The recipes always work--always--and the informational chapters are accurate, to the point, and incredibly helpful--couldn’t live with out it!!" --Cindy Pawlcyn, author of Big Small Plates




A Brief History ofJoy

1930: The United States stock market crashes creating the great depression.
1931: Irma Rombauer takes $3,000, the modest legacy her husband leaves at his death, and she self-publishes the first Joy of Cooking. She is 54 years old.
1932: Irma tries to sell her book to a commercial publisher, Bobbs-Merrill of Indianapolis, IN, and is rejected.
1933: Prohibition is repealed and Adolf Hilter becomes to Chancellor of Germany.
1935: Bobbs-Merrill receives another submission of the Joy of Cooking from Irma. This version is not the self-published book but a revision, typed and bound in 15 notebook binders.
1936: March 26 is the publication date for the first commercial Joy of Cooking. The first print run is 10,000 copies and the book costs $2.50.
1937: The Golden Gate Bridge is completed in San Francisco and Gone with the Wind, a Scribner book, wins the Pulitzer Prize.
1939: Bobbs-Merrill publishes Irma Rombauer's book Streamlined Cooking, a cookbook dedicated to convenience foods. The book is not a commercial success.
1940: Freeze-drying is invented.
1941: Pearl Harbor is attacked and America enters World War II.
1943: The bestselling "wartime" edition of Joy of Cooking is published which includes how to creatively deal with the food rationing during World War II.
1946: A "post-war" edition is printed with very few changes.
1947: The microwave oven is invented.
1951: Marion Rombauer Becker joins her mother Irma as co-author of this edition.
1955: Gunsmoke debuts on CBS.
1961: John F. Kennedy is inaugurated as the President of the United States.
1962: Irma Rombauer dies in her native St. Louis. The sixth edition of Joy of Cooking is published.
1963: The French Chef with Julia Child debuts on public television.
1969: Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin become the first to walk on the moon.
1970: The Beatles break up.
1974: President Nixon resigns and Stephen King’s Carrie is published.
1975: The first--and last--edition of Joy of Cooking that is completely Marion Rombauer Becker's work is published.
1979: Margaret Thatcher becomes the Prime Minister of Great Britain.
1980: The median household income in the United States is $19,074 and it seems the entire country is playing PacMan.
1981: The first genetically engineer plant--the Flavr Savr tomato--is approved for sale.
1984: Coca-Cola changes its 99-year-old formula and launches New Coke.
1990: East and West Germany unite.
1997: After a more than a two decade hiatus, the eighth edition of Joy of Cooking is published by Scribner with Ethan, Marion's son, at the helm.
2006: A new edition of Joy of Cooking, based on the writing and structure of the 1975 edition, is published to celebrate the 75th anniversary of Irma Rombauer's self-published cookbook.


Joy Trivia

• For the 75th anniversary edition, 4,500 recipes were tested that used a total of 400 pounds of butter, 300 quarts of milk, 485 pounds of red meat, and 275 pounds of fish and shellfish.

• The average age of a recipe tester working on the 75th anniversary edition was 46.7 years.

• Recipe testers spend 8,798 hours testing recipes and techniques for the latest edition.

• The knife was the first cutlery invented, followed by the spoon, and, much later, the fork (11th century A.D.).

• Caffeine is the most widely used behavior-changing chemical ingested worldwide.

• Eating cheese slows the decay of teeth.

• A light coating of oil speeds cooking and improves flavor of most grilled foods.

• Some of the most requested recipes from past Joy of Cooking editions include Chicken Marengo, Chocolate Cake (also known as the "Rombauer Special"), and Golden Glow Gelatin Salad.

• Ice is considered one of the most important ingredients in making drinks.

• Popsicles, baby back ribs, smoothies, and power bars are just a few of the recipes making their debut in the 2006 anniversary edition.

• The 2006 Joy of Cooking has instructions on using natural ingredients to color Easter eggs: beets for pink; chopped red cabbage for blue; tumeric for yellow; and the skins of 12 red onions for orange to burnt orange.

• Slow cooker recipes are included in the 2006 Joy for the first time.


From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. They say mother knows best, but in the case of this classic cooking volume, first published 75 years ago, the adage might be more accurately "mother—and grandmother—know best." For while some previous editions of Joy have embraced passing fads and shunned the earlier versions' old-school charm, this time, the editors (led by Irma's grandson and Marion's son, Ethan) have stayed true to the spirit of the original. Fond of its forebear's quirky phrases ("There is nothing simple about these uncomplicated-looking fungi" or "a pig resembles a saint, in that he is more honored after death than during his lifetime"), the new narrative of Joy is one of, well, joy. Its recipes will prompt readers to bound into the kitchen; their range and depth is such that there really is something for everyone. Enchiladas, sushi, bagel chips, smoked brisket and corn dogs make their first appearance, while ice cream, nut butters and beef fondue return after some time away. The use of "we" throughout the text will reassure those skeptical of, say, preparing game (a section that, incidentally, has been expanded), and the overall feeling of the kitchen as a place of empowerment and enrichment makes this an essential work for all cooks. (Oct. 31)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Customer Reviews

I highly recommend this cook book to anyone, experienced cook or a beginner.
C. Watson
I think that if a cook had just one book it should be the "Joy of Cooking", it has everything you would need to know.
J. Stgeorge
I've used the book for its recipes as well as its excellent description of foods and cooking techniques.
ALH

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

390 of 397 people found the following review helpful By Marcy on September 9, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Originally a self-published book in 1931, and no less than nine revisions later, this thick volume of recipes (it's got to be at least 3 inches thick) is a great addition to anyone's cook book library.

But wait! This book is not merely just a collection of recipes- although with 4000 classic recipes and an additional 500 new ones, that would make it worth buying alone. No, this cook book stands heads and shoulders above the rest because its what I call a "teaching" cook book. It contains recipes for just about every dish or food category you can think of which are arranged in various sections throughout the book. Then, at the beginning of each chapter, there is a kind of introduction which goes into detail about that category. For example, the section on grains starts off with an almost encyclopedic explanation of the types of grains, their anatomy, how to combine them, and so on.

A handy, informative cook book with plenty of choices, there is sure to be something for everyone and even healthy eaters will find a great section on what makes up a healthy diet, how many calories you need, etc. Also recommend The Sixty-Second Motivator for readers who need more motivation to eat healthier and have trouble changing their diet habits.
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224 of 226 people found the following review helpful By M. Waring on February 1, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I love the new edition. Love, love, love it! When it arrived, I sat down and started reading it. This will sound silly, but I actually CRIED because it was so fantastic and brought back so many good memories.

I have used the 1975 edition since I started to cook. It was the first book I would turn to when I wanted to see the "standard" recipe for anything. I loved the friendly tone and always found the recipes reliable, producing consistently tasty results. Its only weakness was that it had become a bit dated, in terms of modern tastes and food trends.

I was excited when a new edition of Joy was released in 1997. It turned out to be a total disaster. Among other things, it lacked recipes for pickling and canning, ice cream and lots of other American standards. Additionally, the 1997 edition eliminated the friendly tone and instructions I had come to love. Worst of all, the recipes were not reliable. I made a few really bad dishes from it before I stopped using it almost completely. Its only strength was in its updated instructions for cooking meat, fish and poultry.

This new edition is a tremendous achievement. It keeps the down-to-earth tone of the older editions while providing a perfect selection of old favorites and new (primarily ethnic) dishes that are widely eaten in the US. The ice cream and pickling/canning sections are restored. It's actually an improvement on the 1976 edition, and that's saying something!

I love this edition. I'm throwing out the 1997 edition and eventually I may even part with my old 1975 copy, though it has tremendous nostalgia value for me.
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399 of 419 people found the following review helpful By H. David Natkin on November 18, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This edition of the classic work has all of the charm of the previous volumes but has a number of errors. The Simon and Schuster web site notes a number of "revised" recipes. For instance, one problem highlighted on the discussion board is that the pancakes need 1 3/4 teaspoons of baking powder not 1 3/4 tablespoons.

My first dish out of the new edition turned up a glaring omission. The Chicken Papirikas recipe didn't mention the stock that obviously was needed. I knew to put it in but novices might not.

I'm delighted that we have a new volume to work with but I hope that the publisher will issue a more accurate version soon.
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87 of 88 people found the following review helpful By KTBR on December 21, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The day I found out my grandmother was dying was the day I got this book.

She was sick and I was very hopeful that she would get better. She was lying on the couch in the living room and asked me to boil her a potato. I, being 19, had NO idea how to boil a potato! But I did not want to bother her about it - so I went into the kitchen and started up the pot of water.

Not only did I ruin that cute little potato ... but I saw my grandmother lose it! She came into the kitchen and saw the whole potato (not peeled or cut into fourths) hanging out in the pot and just lost it. She started crying... How can I leave you if you can't even boil a potato?!

My grandfather happened to arrive home at that moment. He did a big sigh when he heard and saw the commotion. My poor frail grandma rolling around on the stool (too weak to stand up even), throwing pans around as she was trying to find another pot to make her potato in. He got her calmed down and fixed her another potato. But before it was even boiled she made him go out to the store "right this minute" and buy me the "Joy of Cooking" cookbook.

She knew that she would not always be in the kitchen with me to help me cook -- so she got me a GREAT back up.

That is how I knew my grandmother wasn't going to get better and that I had better learn how to boil a potato.

In the years that have followed (quite a few of them too) I have used this book to learn how to cook. I love their instructions for cooking beets, steaming artichokes, roasting lamb, pork chops, pork tenderloins, chocolate cake, great pie crusts ... the list goes on and on.

For anyone learning how to cook / wanting to cook or needing another great book - I highly recommend this and thank my grandmother for giving me great instructions on how to cook.
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