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Judaism and Hellenism: Studies in their Encounter in Palestine during the Early Hellenistic Period Paperback – March 14, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-1592441860 ISBN-10: 1592441866 Edition: Reprint

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Judaism and Hellenism: Studies in their Encounter in Palestine during the Early Hellenistic Period + Between Athens and Jerusalem: Jewish Identity in the Hellenistic Diaspora (Biblical Resource)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 666 pages
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub; Reprint edition (March 14, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592441866
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592441860
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,717,339 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Text: English, German (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on December 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
Martin Hengel, considered one of the top biblical scholars in the world, published this book about 1970. It has since influenced a generation of scholars, being cited in hundreds of publications. The book was published in two volumes, with volume one being the book itself, and volume two being the notes and index.

The old History of Religions theory had crashed to an inglorious end when Hengel published this book. Hengel's conclusion was that "It is not possible to say that Judaism maintained a straight course through the Hellenistic period...Still less can it be claimed that it was completely permeated by the Hellenistic spirit" (p310).

The 'wisdom school' was influenced by Greek thought, which among the people took on a strong eschatological expectation. Still, Hengel insists that Judaism maintained its singularity. "The almost complete fusion of religion and nationalism... prevented any assimilation" (p 313).

Among the Greek influences were the 100 years Palestine was under the Ptolemies, Attic pottery, the Greek language, irrigation, and minted money. "Interest in Hellenistic civilization, however, remained predominantly limited to the well-to-do aristocracy of Jerusalem" (p 56). So did that main pipeline of Hellenism, Greek schools.

Earlier schools among the Jews were "exclusive, status-conscious... scribal schools" (p 80). Among the Jewish people, even as Hellenism was influencing their elite, elementary schools were formed that had enormous impact on the common people. The idea was to educate every Jewish boy. Simeon b Setah ordered all Jewish boys to go to school. So did Jubilees.

"The school age was set a 6-7...non-Jews and Samaritans were prohibited as teachers...
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