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Julian, Volume III (Loeb Classical Library, No. 157) Hardcover – January 31, 1923

ISBN-13: 978-0674991736 ISBN-10: 0674991737

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Julian, Volume III (Loeb Classical Library, No. 157) + Julian, Volume II. Orations 6-8. Letters to Themistius. To The Senate and People of Athens. To a Priest. The Caesars. Misopogon (Loeb Classical Library No. 29) + Julian, Volume I. Orations 1-5 (Loeb Classical Library No. 13)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press (January 31, 1923)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674991737
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674991736
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 4.5 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,384,462 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 2, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This is a good book, mostly a compilation of julians letters to various figures in the old roman empire. bishops, generals, governors, and townspeople. But the chapter i most recommend is
Against the Galilaeans. Its a side by side cross examination of Christianity Versus Paganism. A good read for anyone who isnt afraid to have their faith debated. Julian asks a lot of relevant questions on the nature of divinity, debates sections of text, Pagan and Christian, extensively, and places those wich are relevant side by side, for a compare/contrast session that is sure to leave you asking questions at best, and offended at worst. He is a bit brash sometimes, and tries to make a case against parts of the bible, but that makes it more interesting, and he asks himself a lot of the same questions that i did. It also helps that this book is over 1200 years old, and is still very relevant. I recommend it.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Cassius@juliansociety.org on October 4, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The third volume of the Emperor Julian's works contains invaluable information concerning his views on Pagan religion. Included are letters to members of the Pagan priesthood, as well as general information regarding Julian's religious ideas written to friends. Julian's works are certainly the most important primary resources for late antiquity Paganism... as emperor his view was unique in that he had resources far beyond those of his contemporaries.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Ashtar Command on October 28, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Julian, known as Julian the Apostate by his opponents, was Roman emperor from 361 to 363. He was the last pagan ruler of the Roman Empire, and the only one who wrote an extensive treatise against Christianity. Julian was brought up as a Christian but apostasized later in life, becoming a zeolus pagan and Neo-Platonist. As emperor he attempted to do away with Christianity, which had become the state religion of the Empire under Julian's predeccesors Constantine the Great and Constantius (who were incidentally Julian's relatives). This pagan counter-offensive came to an abrupt end when Julian was killed in combat against the Parthians in 363.

Loeb Classical Library have translated all of Julian's extant writings, and published them in three volumes. The most interesting volume is this, the third, since it contains a re-construction of Julian's treatise against Christianity, "Against the Galileans". As usual in this series, the Old Greek original text is reproduced alongside the English translation. (Other English translations of "Against the Galileans" are also available here at Amazon.com.)

"Against the Galileans" is a very interesting text. Many of Julian's arguments against Christianity feel very modern, showing that critics of the Christian message had pretty much the same objections then as now. Some of the emperor's arguments can be used even by atheists, others could presumably be used by New Age believers. Obviously, Julian also has a few arguments of his own. The term "Galilean" is Julians insulting name for the Christians.

In a short review like this, only the barest outline of Julian's arguments are possible. To Julian, the Christians are wicked people who have apostasized from the pagan traditions of their fathers to Judaism.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Arch Stanton on July 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Since there are so many of these darn things the review shall be divided into three sections. First, a brief description of the Loeb series of books and their advantages/disadvantages. Second shall be my thoughts on the author himself, his accuracy, as well as his style and the style of his translator. This is of course only my opinion and should be treated as such. The final part shall review what this particular book actually covers.

The Loeb series date back to the turn of the last century. They are designed for people with at least some knowledge of Greek or Latin. They are a sort of compromise between a straight English translation and an annotated copy of the original text. On the left page is printed the text in Greek or Latin depending on the language of the writer and on the right side is the text in English. For somebody who knows even a little Greek or Latin these texts are invaluable. You can try to read the text in the original language knowing that you can correct yourself by looking on the next page or you can read the text in translation and check the translation with the original for more detail. While some of the translations are excellent mostly they are merely serviceable since they are designed more as an aid to translation rather than a translation in themselves. Most of them follow the Greek or Latin very closely. These books are also very small, maybe just over a quarter the size of your average hardcover book. This means that you'll need to buy more than just one book to read a complete work. They are also somewhat pricey considering their size. The Loeb Collection is very large but most of the more famous works can be found in better (and cheaper) translations elsewhere.
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