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106 of 128 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Behind Every Great Woman There Stands a Great Man . . .
What in the world does television and concocting-French-food-in-America pioneer Julia Child have in common with just 30-something government employee turned food blogger, Julie Powell?

Other than the love of food, oodles of butter and a big project to fill the need for purpose, the two main characters in Nora Ephron's biopic, "Julie and Julia" share great...
Published on August 7, 2009 by Diana Faillace Von Behren

versus
278 of 325 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars for Film, No Stars for DVD Special Features Manipulation
Well, I guess it's finally happened...the consumer and film buff who does not own a Blue-Ray compatible DVD player is now officially SOL. The standard DVD release of Julie and Julia contains as special features only a commentary track and behind-the-scenes featurette. To get the full array of special features, one must purchase the Blue-Ray version of the film, AND of...
Published on November 18, 2009 by IVE


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278 of 325 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars for Film, No Stars for DVD Special Features Manipulation, November 18, 2009
By 
IVE (California USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Julie & Julia (DVD)
Well, I guess it's finally happened...the consumer and film buff who does not own a Blue-Ray compatible DVD player is now officially SOL. The standard DVD release of Julie and Julia contains as special features only a commentary track and behind-the-scenes featurette. To get the full array of special features, one must purchase the Blue-Ray version of the film, AND of course, a Blue-Ray dvd player. Here are the features NOT available on the standard dvd: tour of Julia Child's kitchen in the Smithsonian; featurette "Friends and Family Remember Julia Child;" and "Cooking Lessons," with Julia Child, Jacques Pepin, and other renowned chefs preparing several of Julia Child's best-loved dishes. Why can't the studio release a two-disc special edition in the standard format for consumers like me who don't own the latest home entertainment equipment? I loved the film (especially The Divine Ms. Streep), loved Julia Child's book "My Life in France," very much liked Julie Powell's book "J & J," and can't tell you how much I've been looking forward to owning the DVD. I'm miffed, and in no position to go out and buy myself a new DVD player in this economy, not even at Christmas. This really stinks. So, five stars for the film itself, no stars for the DVD release manipulation.
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106 of 128 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Behind Every Great Woman There Stands a Great Man . . ., August 7, 2009
What in the world does television and concocting-French-food-in-America pioneer Julia Child have in common with just 30-something government employee turned food blogger, Julie Powell?

Other than the love of food, oodles of butter and a big project to fill the need for purpose, the two main characters in Nora Ephron's biopic, "Julie and Julia" share great marriages with men that are not put off by their mate's desire for self-identity defined by more than a few little bouts of self-absorption. Like a good soufflé, Ephron folds the stories told in two books, Powell's "Julie and Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously" and Child's "My Life in France" without deflating the overall mixture, although this reviewer would have enjoyed more scenes with the wonderfully talented Meryl Streep who redeems herself quite well (all high-pitched voice, champagne bubbly laughter and squared shoulders) as the indomitable and effusive Julia from her most un-defining role as Donna in that "Mamma Mia! The Movie (Widescreen)" debacle.

Ephron depicts 1950s Paris with a foodie's appreciation for what that city did and still does for the world of cuisine--from the very first glimpse of Julia's luncheon of sole meunière--the waiter delectably filets the fish's sumptuous flesh tableside to the audiences' very audible groans of anticipation of and appreciation for its buttery taste, but she also does well by Long Island City and its tangle of grey-tinged tenements, elevated trains and apartments over pizza parlors. Somehow, both Julie and Julia know where to get their ingredients and manage beat, chop (extremely amusing is a scene of Julia alongside a mountain of practice cut onions) and coerce calf's feet, lobsters and ducks into exquisite works of edible art. The luscious chocolate cakes, whipped creams and raspberry mousse tantalizes like the food porn that it is--a sensual and lascivious reminder to what is truly important in life--you will leave the theater hungry.

Along that line, the two couples, Paul (Stanley Tucci) and Julia and Eric (Chris Messina) and Julie either act as the aphrodisiacs for the food or allow the food to whisk them away in the general direction of the bedroom where dessert or in some cases appetizers segue into the joy of sex and more sex--no wonder Julia was always smiling. Both male characters offer their women encouragement along the lines of the supporting architectural buttresses on the Cathedral of Notre Dame even when faced by what may seem a bit of an "I Love Lucy" type scheme. Regardless, both these ladies made their ideas work whether by design or serendipity and Ephron, wisely asserts that it is their good marriages that deserve the credit--even though the real life Powell has an affair which she chronicles in her not-yet-published memoir about learning the art of the butcher.

Amy Adams' portrayal of Julie Powell seems a little seeped in too much sugar especially if one has read the Julie/Julia Project blog or the book that bears the same name as the film. In her version, Ephron sanitizes the conservative-hating Powell, cleans up her apartment, washes out her rather profane mouth and thankfully eliminates the girlfriend dramas that take up a third of the memoir. However, the slim-figured Adams' whose character claims to have gained weight after a year of rich French cuisine simply seems slim and still glows with that Giselle insouciance and naiveté she did so well in the Disney film "Enchanted (Widescreen Edition)." Even so, Adams' innate cuteness and 20-something sense of searching works adequately as a foil for the larger than life Streep as the formidable Child.

Bottom Line? Nora Ephron's "Julie and Julia" chronicles the projects of two women from two very different generations with similar needs. As a combination foodie/chick flick, it works very well in its depiction of determination and the power of a slow and steady perseverance that ultimately leads to success. However, "Julie and Julia" main thrust seems to be a tribute to good marriages where behind every great women stands an equally great and supportive male. Recommended.
Diana Faillace Von Behren
"reneofc"
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A far better film than a book., October 30, 2009
By 
Graves (Pennsylvania) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Julie & Julia (DVD)
All too often when a well loved book is turned into a film, fans of the book bemoan how the director or the screen writer got it wrong and all the wonderful things the book had that got lost on the way to the screen. And then you get the rare case when the film is so much better than the book that you wonder if you'll ever bother to look at the book again. "Julie & Julia" with Meryl Streep and Amy Adams is one of those films.

Based on Julie Powell's blog, a New York office drone, dreading the approach of the Big 3-0, breaks out of her life by attempting to go through every recipe in the first volume of Julia Child's "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" in one year. While the book focuses almost exclusively on Julie Powell in her Queens apartment, the film splits time equally between Amy Adams' Julie on her epic food quest and Meryl Streep as Julia Child in post war France, who takes cooking lessons as a way to break up the boredom of her day waiting for her husband to come home.

Each actress dominates each scene she is in with a sense of life and energy. A lot of fuss is made over Streep's portrayal of Child as she goes from chopping her first onion, literally, to getting her cook book published. But equally important to the film is Adams as Powell, the woman who never finishes anything, determinedly holding on to her self appointed project and this is the driving energy behind the film. As much as Streep pours energy and life into her version of Child, we know she makes it, we know she becomes the Grand Dame of TV chefs. On some level we know Powell success too but for her it is less a quest to be published than to finish the journey of self discovery she has set herself on. Streep shows us how Child started out, we know what she becomes. Adams' Powell brings us along to find out what she will become.

In the book Powell is following Child's direction from the cookbook but is not a particular devote. By comparison in the film Adams' portrayal has her ready to quote Child on any number of topics and this creates the link between the two women the audience needs.

In the book Powell brings a lot of personal baggage that gets old fast, the film ignores this and focuses on what the women have in common. It doesn't talk down to the audience but lets you follow along through cooking, supportive husbands and love. Not just the love of a good meal, but the sort that encourages you to grow and be more than you were. This isn't a film just for foodies, but for people who dare to act on a dream, or think they might. Oh and for record, I haven't deboned a whole duck...yet.
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50 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ALL THE ACTORS SHINE, August 8, 2009
I went to see the movie, Julie and Julia solely on the idea that any project Meryl Streep is involved in would automatically be good. I couldn't imagine before going to see it how they would possibly work the storyline because it was based on two memoirs, one each by the two women involved. Meryl Streep played Julia Child and Amy Adams played Julie Powell. Because of her immense respect for Julia Child and her love of cooking Julie Powell decided to set aside 365 days to cook for her husband and herself and as it turned out several other people 524 of Julia Child's recipes. It started out as a way of breaking the boredom of her day job, an escape from having to live in such a tiny apartment, and a means of teaching her self-discipline by sticking to a planned regimen on a day to day basis. The result, however, turned out to be much more than that.

Julia Child had and Julie Powell has a very important knowledge about what makes good food great. Great food is like great sex; both of them have to be more than just "ok" to bring a smile to your face that lasts for days every time you think about it. And both women shared in common the idea that delicious French food should be available to the average American family even if you don't have servants that cook for you or an income that allows you to eat out at a fabulous French restaurant any time you like. Both of them had wonderful husbands who supported and encouraged their dreams of rising above the drab existence of living vicariously on the accomplishments of their men. The film captures beautifully the difficulty of that task for both Julie and Julia. Both of them had forces fighting against their achieving their goals, but the love that was evident in each of their marriages overcame every one of them.

One of the posters for the film is a one-sided poster with a black background, two eggs (one brown and one white), and the question posed, "Passion. Ambition. Butter. Do you have what it takes?" When the movie is over, that question's answer is for both women a resounding "Yes, but as is always the case, neither of them did it alone". The fact that they didn't do it alone though takes nothing away from the uniqueness of their accomplishments.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Two movies, one very good, the other ............, September 11, 2010
By 
captain cuttle (Vancouver, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Julie & Julia (DVD)
We have two movies here. One is a superbly-acted, well-scripted piece about a fascinating couple, one of whom is now deservedly a household name. The other is a sub-soap opera effort about a couple of nobodies and their straight-out-of-Cosmopolitan-short-stories friends, given lines that nobody in real life would utter unless that person watched too much daytime tv. I guess the film maker thought we wouldn't be interested in Julia Child unless her story was somehow linked to the kind of tv drivel that passes as entertainment today. It was just about worth sitting through all this for the Julia Child scenes. Child (Streep) and husband are as spectacularly good as the other two are spectacularly bad. Hopefully there will be a future dvd edition that will allow one-touch navigation through the movie, deleting everything involving the nobodies.
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25 of 32 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars This needs more salt..., December 24, 2009
By 
Andrew Ellington (I'm kind of everywhere) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Julie & Julia (DVD)
I want to start by saying that this is not a simple case of `Meryl Streep is better than Amy Adams' even if a lot of other reviewers want to paint it as that. This is much more complicated than that. In fact, Amy Adams is fine here. She has her moments of charming, her moments of intensity, her moments of hysteria and overall she is adequate. The real issue I have with `Julie & Julia' is that it doesn't live up to the subject matter and the script is a sloppy and uninspired mess.

That, and a few `other' things.

The film shifts from Julia Child's life in Paris and Julie Powell's life in New York. Streep portrays Child as she begins to take a hold of her own identity, learning to cook and channeling her good-natured mentality into a healthy and respectable career. Adams portrays Powell as she tries to break away from the downtrodden near pathetic path she has chosen by finding herself in Julia Child's recipes. It is clear that Powell is inspired and in awe of Child and wants to feel a connection with her.

For me, this all sounds like it could produce delicious results. Sadly, this meal is rather bland.

I'm going to go ahead and start with the acting, since that is what is getting all the attention. When I first saw this film in the theater all those months ago, it was the first bit `potential Oscar contender'. Everyone had been raving Streep as `on her way to the podium for her THIRD Oscar' and so I was excited. I love Meryl Streep. When I walked out of this film I thought to myself, `she was good, and funny, and charming, but there is no way she is the best'. Then I saw a few other films (`Bright Star' and `An Education' to be exact) and there was no question in my mind that what Carey Mulligan does in `An Education' is not only the best performance of this year, but is a complete marvel and one of the best performances in any category of this ENTIRE DECADE. After watching this film for a second time last night I found myself even MORE confused about Streep's Oscar buzz (and countless critic award wins). Meryl Streep is undoubtedly a force in front of the camera. Nearly everything she does is phenomenal. Sadly, for me, her performance here is a tad too far over the top. She is hammy and, while that quality can at times be appealing (her constant jovialness is infective), the script is so dense and hollow that it barely allows Streep to expound on the WOMAN that was Julia Child. There are subtle hints that something is brewing beneath the surface (her sincere breakdown after learning of her sister's pregnancy) but this film is more focused on the food (which all looks delicious BTW) than giving us a real taste of who Julia was as a person.

Streep is entertaining, but she is FAR from Oscar worthy.

Like I said, Amy Adams is adequate. She doesn't really do anything wrong, but the whole idea of her character and her life is far too clichéd to be anything noteworthy. The snag in her marriage and that whole FORCED breakup is ridiculous, but totally something you saw coming the moment she said, in her blog, that she was `risking her marriage' for this experiment. Her manic desperation can at times be endearing and entertaining, but nothing we haven't seen a million times before.

As far as the significant others go, Stanley Tucci is the best thing about this movie (end of discussion) and Chris Messina is the worst. I love the quiet and supportive nature of Stanley Tucci. He just has this softness and this endearing quality to him. I adored him in `The Devil Wears Prada' and I find his work here, alongside Streep, to be equal parts charming and engaging. His warmth never feels forced or awkward (in contrast, when Adams delivers the SAME TOAST she fails miserably at giving it any kind of natural affection). Messina is just an obnoxious stereotype who fails to do anything by overwork his character, and that disgusting way he eats his food haunts my dreams.

In the end, the biggest culprit here is Nora Ephron, the films director and screenwriter. Because of her, the film lacks any real bite whatsoever. It is bland and boring, overly long and full of generic clichés that make this far less than a film of its nature should be. This is supposed to be an inspirational `coming of age', romantic comedy set to the tone of a biopic, but it lacks any of the chemistry and warmth that make those specific film genres so lovely.
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Interesting that Ephron's other film with Streep was called "Heartburn", January 7, 2010
This review is from: Julie & Julia (DVD)
But actually, rather than too much spice, the problem with this film is blandness, an incredible amount of blandness. I've never before seen a movie with *no* friction, no real conflict, no action--and by "action" I don't mean blowing up Death Stars. Julie & Julia made me think of a scene from, of all things, an episode of Frasier. Niles and Marty somehow get their video rentals mixed up at the store and take each other's movies home. Niles gets a Charles Bronson film, which he's surprised to find suspenseful. "I felt the same way about your movie, My Dinner With Andre," his father chides him. "Talk about suspense. I kept wondering, 'Will they order dessert?' 'Who'll get the check?'"

That pretty much sums up my reaction to Julie and Julia, a film based on not one but two memoirs. It's hard to get excited about a picture where the plot hinges on burned beef or improperly chopped vegetables. Of course I expect stuff like that, and it's in all the ads, but I also thought, as the movie went on, there's be more, that we'd discover something deeper about Julia Child, or maybe even Julie Powell, her mindless deciple. But no, three-quarters of the way into the film and we're still watching Julie stumble through recipes and break into tears when one of them doesn't come out. Nora Ephron, who has a reputation in the film world I cannot fathom, directs as though J&J were a half-brained sitcom, broadly and for forced laughs. (You just know a dessert creation she's taking to work for her colleagues is going to go splat on the sidewalk as she's transporting it, don't you?) Now, I didn't expect this to be Bergman, but can't we do better than this?

To give just one example: Julie's boyfriend, whose purpose in the movie is little more than to cheer Julie on, has a mild fight with her at one point and leaves. Now, she could have decided to give up cooking: imagine her throwing Julie Child's cookbook into the dumpster and saying on her blog that she gives up. (I know this didn't really happen, but something has to spice this story up.) Imagine her mother trying to talk her back into it, only to hear her say No, she's decided, she's a failure. Again. Then in a heartwarming moment, boyfriend returns--with a present: he's rescued the cookbook from the dumpster, cleaned it up, and gift wrapped it. He hands it back to her, and she resolves to start cooking again, right then and there, at one in the morning or whatever. Okay, I know that's a big "Hollywood moment" in itself, but it's *better* than what actually happens, trust me. She even tells her mother she's not really done with cooking, so you know nothing's really at risk. What she never tells her mother or us is why anyone is supposed to care.

Many critics have at least praised Streep's end of it, for her channeling of Julia Child. While she does her usual admiral job, at the same time when it was over I couldn't help think that even her performance was one-dimensional. I'm sure Ms. Child wasn't chipper falsetto voice and awkward mannerisms all the time, but that's what we see on the screen, whether she's hosting her TV show or making love to her husband, whose purpose in this film is little more than to cheer her on. (There's a throw-away bit about some McCarthyism witch-hunting that's gone in the blink of an eye.) I would have like to see Meryl's take on JC in her more intimate moments of self-doubt or reflection. Instead we get a performance that's a bit more impersonation than exploration.

Some impressive people worked on this film. Ann Roth is the finest costume designer there is right now (excepting maybe Sandy Powell). Alexandre Desplat, who gave us one of the most memorable film scores in recent years (Birth), provides the music. Scott Rudin is down as one of the producers, always a good sign. Their giant talents don't seem well-utilized by Ephron. The flm is shot like a TV show, mostly in medium shots. It ping-pongs rather predictably between the two stories, trying to cement really trivial elements common to them both. There's a certain absurdity to the obsession with *food* that the film, in its quest to take all this so seriously, just misses. In ne scene Julie is so excited that someone is coming to dinner at her house. This is built up and then we cut away just before she reveals the person, to build up suspense. Yet when we return to Julie's story and discover the name, we've never heard of her and Julie admits that even though the woman is a "food legend" two months ago she hadn't either. I think it'd have been funnier to punch that up, as in, He: Who's that? She: I don't have the slightest idea either, but I hear she's important! Instead Ephron seems to think we are supposed to get all excited about this person, as though we are trendy Manhattanites. And even they get very little "food porn." There's actually few shots of luscious meals being prepared, and as Roger Ebert correctly observes, Julie's husband just seems to gobble down whatever he gets, grateful that, at midnight on a worknight, he's finally getting something to eat. (I won't even go into the fact that I don't buy this story actually happened. 524 recipes in 365 days? Even if you never get sick or have an off-day, that's almost two recipes a day. Some of them require hours and hours of prep-time. And she held down a full-time job, if this movie is accurate. I have a feeling that's the reason in real life Julia Child was not enamored with Miss Julie. She seemed to regard the whole blog as little more than a publicity stunt. Hey, it worked.)

Ultimately I think J&J says more about the age we live in than anything about Julie *or* Julia. We seem so desperate for celebrities in this internet age that we get excited about people who do rather trivial things. Yes, I think cooking all 524 recipes in the Julia Child cookbook is, when all is said and done, trivial. Difficult, assuming she really did it, but trivial. We are starved for heroes, so much so that we have to manufacture so many of them. When we do get a real one on occasion (Sully Sullenberger) we overdose on him. So we fill up the vacuum with talentless reality stars, over-the-hill rockers, and people like Julie Powell, who judging by reaction to her second book is already past her 15 minutes.

The movie's transfer to disk looks just fine. There were supplements, but I had absolutely no interest. I'm glad that, at 60, when most major stars are forced into retirement, Meryl Streep is still working regularly. I just wish there were more projects out there worthy of her talent.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 4 Stars ONLY Because of Streep & Tucci, February 27, 2010
This review is from: Julie & Julia (DVD)
My husband and I watched this and felt like we were watching two separate movies.

One movie was greatly watchable and interesting - Meryl Streep and Stanly Tucci portrayed Julia and Paul Child with great like-ability. Talented as always - Streep lives up to her well-earned reputation as one of the most talented actors.

The other movie, portraying Julie and her husband, was also well acted, but Julie's character is so narcissistic and terribly unlikeable. This type of movie should be a feel-good movie, but the parts with Julie and her husband are not.

Walked away from this film, thankful for having seen the Julia Child part, but the Julie Powell part are minutes of my life I will never get back.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Two Women, 524 Recipes, One Story, August 13, 2009
By 
I have no illusions that Nora Ephron's "Julie & Julia" is a complete or accurate depiction of either Julie Powell or Julia Child. It achieves exactly what it wants to achieve simply by being a pleasant, light-hearted movie. I admit that part of me is a little disappointed by this; because it goes for pure feel-good entertainment, I suspect the exact same story could have been told whether or not the characters were drawn from real people. As fun and loveable as they appear on screen, Powell and Child seem no more or less authentic than sitcom personalities, which is to say they appeal to our fun side but don't really go any deeper than that. I enjoyed them as characters, but I can't say that I learned anything about them as people. They were, in fact, so narrowly drawn that they were just shy of one-dimensional.

Let's start with Julia Child. She's played by Meryl Streep, and if you think she's yet again another shoe-in for an Oscar nomination, you'd be right. Streep's performance is nothing short of flawless, having perfected Child's distinctively deep voice and bubbly personality. What seems flawed is the way Child was developed for Streep: Are we seeing the real Julia Child, or are we seeing the Julia Child she presented herself as for television? I obviously have no way of knowing for sure, but on the basis of this film, I would guess that we weren't seeing the woman behind the image. Some have said that her TV persona was one and the same with her real persona, but how can anyone know for sure? Chances are you've never met her. I can only go with my gut and say that, in most cases, the way celebrities behave in front of a camera is different from the way they behave in their personal lives.

That being said, the image we see in this film is certainly a nice one. Starting in 1949 and continuing throughout the `50s in Paris, her story paints a portrait of an eager, determined, energetic person who simply wanted to do something with her life. Realizing her passion is food, her remarkably supportive husband, Paul (Stanley Tucci), encourages her to pursue something in that field. And so she does: She attends the world renowned Le Cordon Bleu. And in spite of stiff competition and a snooty old woman in charge of the place, Child becomes a chef. She eventually meets a very pleasant woman named Simone Beck (Linda Emond), and the two decide to write a French cookbook for Americans. It proves to be a massive undertaking, one that will consume Child for the next several years.

Now let's talk about Julie Powell. She's played by Amy Adams, who thus far has never failed to play someone loveable. Her story takes place in 2002, right as she moves into a tiny apartment above a pizza shop in Queens with her husband, Eric (Chris Messina). Powell, an aspiring writer who never had anything published, finds herself sick of sitting behind a cubicle taking calls about 9/11 insurance. She decides to make a name for herself by writing a blog. But what to write about? Lo and behold, she has a copy of "Mastering the Art of French Cooking," co-authored by Julia Child. She then sets a goal for herself: In the space of 365 days, she will cook all of the book's 524 recipes and document her progress on the blog. As the year progresses, she becomes more and more consumed with her project. Worse yet, she can never stop gushing over Julia Child, nor can she go more than a day without saying how spiritually and mentally connected they are. Not surprisingly, it begins to put a strain on her marriage.

We're essentially being shown a portrait of two women separated by time yet united by sheer determination. The problem with a concept like determination is that it can often be mistaken as mere single-mindedness, and indeed, both Child and Powell are portrayed as so one-tracked that they occasionally become annoying. Honestly, how did the husbands put up with them for so long? Paul Child, as depicted in this movie, is so accepting and so soft-spoken that you'd swear he had absolutely no opinions of his own. As for Eric Powell, there does come a point when he loses his temper and leaves the apartment for a few days. But on the whole, he too is complacent and unassuming, so much so that it has a tendency to drag the story down.

But as flawed as this movie is, I can't fault it for being exactly what it wants to be: Entertaining. "Julie & Julia" is like a fluffy soufflé that hits the tongue and melts, which is to say that it gives us something sweet and airy before evaporating. I may not have learned much about either Julie Powell or Julia Child, but at least I can say that, for two hours, I was given the chance to indulge in cinematic goodness. What made the experience richer were the talents of Meryl Streep and Amy Adams, who continue to prove what great actresses they really are. Of course, we all know what overindulgence will lead to, so I urge you not to see too many movies like this in one sitting. Instead, spend more time in search of fresher films with more wholesome ingredients. Might I suggest "(500) Days of Summer"?
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Watch Julia, skip Julie, December 22, 2009
This review is from: Julie & Julia (DVD)
I think Amy Adams is a fine actress -- but this is -- and I wish it had been totally -- Julia Child's story. Julie Powell tried something that was -- OK, interesting, but also pretty self-indulgent. And maybe if I hadn't read that her new book is a tell-all about her now-failed marriage, I would be less opinionated. But then again...

I wish Ephron, who is a terrific director, had chosen to make "Julia Child in Paris" and left Julie out of it. Meryl Streep and Stanley Tucci are just out of this world and I would have loved to have seen a movie just about Julia and Paul -- if you've ever read not only this book, but the several bios of Mrs. Child, you'd know there is enough material for four hours, let alone two.

More Meryl, more Julia!
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Julie & Julia
Julie & Julia by Nora Ephron (DVD - 2009)
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