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Jump Point: How Network Culture is Revolutionizing Business Hardcover – February 21, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1 edition (February 21, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 007154562X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071545624
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,262,461 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Critical Acclaim for Jump Point

“This is the Tipping Point for geeks.”-Guy Kawasaki

“Ignore this book at your peril. Tom Hayes has seen the future of business-and it is both scary and exhilarating.”-Michael S. Malone, ABCNews.com

“Tom Hayes navigates the future with alacrity. you will learn about bemes, rumor laws, shopping gossip, astroturfing, cruft, and attention theft-all fundamental sociological aspects of the evolving internet and all its offshoots. I read Jump Point and had five new ideas for companies that entrepreneurs can pursue.”-Tim Draper, Draper Fisher Jurvetson

Jump Point rewarded my attention! Tom Hayes writes with great clarity and insight about new consumers and how new media and technology are changing our daily life habits…one of the best business books I have read this year.”-Ted Leonsis, Vice Chairman Emeritus, AOL

About the Author

Tom Hayes has been called a “tastemaker for the new net generation,” and a marketing maverick. A veteran of Silicon Valley, his career includes executive positions at HP, Applied Materials, AMD, and telecom software leader Enea. Tom was the founding CEO and Chairman of Joint Venture: Silicon Valley. Fast Company magazine called him “a model citizen for the 21st Century” for his many efforts to promote good corporate citizenship among high tech companies. His blog, Tombomb.com, is a popular and often-quoted commentary on the world of Web 2.0 and beyond. Visit jumppointbook.com.


More About the Author

Tom Hayes has been called 'a tastemaker for the next Net Generation' and 'a model citizen for the 21st Century.' A longtime leader in Silicon Valley, Hayes has been a senior marketing executive at such Silicon Valley giants as Hewlett-Packard, Applied Materials and AMD.

Hayes is the author of Jump Point: How Network Culture is Revolutionizing Business, published by McGraw-Hill and co-author of No Size Fits All: From Mass Markets to Mass Handselling(Penguin/Portfolio).

Hayes has developed a loyal audience through his award-winning blog, TomBomb.com, one of the most widely-read and quoted weblogs covering the new connected economy and its consumers.

Customer Reviews

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See all 9 customer reviews
It's the end of the world as we know it ... and I feel fine.
E. Harris
A major hallmark of the future will be a battle for the consumer's attention, with the winner going to those businesses whom the consumer trusts.
Eric Balkan
A superbly written, well researched analysis which is also a great read.
AIR User

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Eric Balkan on March 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Ever wonder what the interaction between business and consumers will be like in the not-too-distant future? (Hint: it probably won't include the singing cereal box of the movie Minority Report.) Author Tom Hayes thinks we're in the first steps of a massive cultural change, as fundamental as The Industrial Revolution. Inter-connectivity. You can see it beginning now with the success of social networking sites, and retailer websites like this one that allow for user reviews.

A major hallmark of the future will be a battle for the consumer's attention, with the winner going to those businesses whom the consumer trusts. (Out with TV pitchmen and in with friends' recommendations.) Those businesses that allow consumers to mashup their own products will leave behind those that insist on strict intellectual property rights.

You can see a lot where the future is going by just looking around, by extrapolating trends, but Hayes puts it all together into a cohesive whole. This is a must-read book for anyone, businessperson or consumer, who wants to understand where society is going. And Hayes thinks we'll be there soon -- predicting 2011 as the point where there'll be 3 billion people world-wide connected to the Internet.

I gave the book 5 stars not because it was perfect -- I think Hayes's enthusiasm sometimes makes him jump to conclusions -- but because there are so many ideas and observations here that it would take ages to put something like this together from other sources. And it's well-written, in a light, breezy style, that kept my attention throughout. Well-done!
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By T. Adams on April 1, 2009
Format: Hardcover
When taking on a book about the future of business written before the collapse of the global financial markets, one enters questioning its value. Jump Point by Tom Hayes is part analysis and part futurist predictions. Is the analysis sound enough to outweigh an enormous shift in assumptions (i.e. the economy will continue to grow with little interruption.)? Or has the economic collapse so fundamentally changed the landscape as to render Hayes' thesis moot?

The Jump Point (spoiler alert) according to Hayes is the moment in which every worker on the planet has entered the networked economy - participated in online commerce. This is marked by the 3 billionth person entering the net in the year 2011, with 2 billion having arrived in 2007 and the first billion in 2001. This moment according to Hayes is what might otherwise be called an inflexion point or a tipping point - a marker in time that indicates when the whole world shifted. The first billion netizens, the early adopters, set the rules.; the second billion conformed and tried to fit in; the third billion is the mystery.

The majority of the book looks at the current trends which are assigning significance to the Jump Point. Hayes dissects the culture of NOW, the issues around being plugged in 24/7 across the planet coupled with the expectations of instant change and gratification that comes with it. He takes us into the Mash-up culture and how it is at war with the world of ©. It doesn't look good for ©. He looks at East Coast America's shrinking influence in the Global Network as rapid growth in nodes occurs outside of EST and in fact on the opposite side of the planet. He examines a new currency being exchanged: trust, and its importance within the new world order.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By E. Harris on April 1, 2009
Format: Hardcover
At the close of Tom Hayes' "Jump Point: How Network Culture is Revolutionizing Business," the author enigmatically asks "Is the Jump Point the opening of a portal to a new Renaissance?" The answer? Apparently that comes after the Jump.

Hayes starts off, though, by sounding the alarm. He forecasts that the next Jump Point, or turning point in human experience, will happen when the web welcomes its third billionth user. Three billion is roughly the size of the global workforce. And that moment when the global workforce is online and everything we think we know about conducting business will be upended is racing towards us with an ETA of 2011.

According to Hayes, Jump Points have occurred throughout history whenever technology, economics, and culture converge to produce transformational change. It's not usually apparent in the moment, but in retrospect this moment looks like a sudden, non-linear growth surge in the adoption of a particular technology. He takes us through a fascinating leap across historical Jump Points: the creation of first organized cosmopolitan city-state Catal Huyuk, the manufacture of personal timepieces in Italy, the use of steam engine technology in the textile mills of Massachusetts. Hayes carefully differentiates these Jump Points from the invention of new technologies: the Jump Point is when the impact of the application of, integration of, or widespread adoption of a technology occurs, and it can come months, years, a century after the technological invention, or trigger.

Hayes doesn't project an evolutionary shift or a gradual transition from the world as we know it to the future post-Jump state, or The Next Curve, as he puts it.
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