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Jump Up!

46 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Vinyl
  • Label: Geffen
  • ASIN: B005LA0WU2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By David Sigler on May 2, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Elton John had started the 80s with a huge hit called Little Jeannie from a solid album called 21 At 33. He followed that album with the similar but lukewarm The Fox. Well hold on. Because on this outing, Elton John wakes up and hits the ground running. If you thought he was down and out, he was preparing his fans for a release that was truly the jump start of his career in the 1980s.
Jump Up contains some outstanding songs. Dear John, Spiteful Child, Legal Boys, Blue Eyes, Empty Garden, Where Have All The Goodtimes Gone and All Quiet On The Western Front. The production has never been stronger with thanks to Chris Thomas for giving these songs a real shine without over doing it. The tight production on songs like Spiteful Child and Legal Boys measure up to anything that came before this effort.
Elton sings convincingly and with a self-assurance that resembles his best known work. The ache in his voice during Empty Garden, the wonderful tribute to John Lennon is moving. Elton has said he had fun making this release and it shows. He and producer Chris Thomas started to gel and while the hits Blue Eyes and Empty Garden may overshadow this album, it was a perfectly well executed album that deserves to be heard.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jim Hanson on July 3, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Elton made it clear he was going to be a force to reckon with on Jump Up. Yielding two top 15 singles, Blue Eyes and the John Lennon tribute Empty Garden, Jump Up! is Elton's most consistent effort since Captain Fantastic in 1975.
Jump Up is a great sounding album with a variety of great songs. Spiteful Child and I am your Robot are punkish rockers; Princess and Empty Garden are classic Elton ballads; Blue Eyes is a Frank Sinatra-esque tune; Dear John is a bouncy rocker; Where have all the good times gone? is a great philly-soul sounding song. There aren't any bad songs here and the album has a bouyant, energetic and polished feel to it. In my opinion, it is one Elton's best of the 1980s.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By John Kwok HALL OF FAME on December 28, 2006
Format: Audio CD
"Jump Up!" was one of Elton John's best albums from the 1980s, and I think it still holds up quite well today. It was Elton's first album with producer Chris Thomas, who would produce most of Elton's 1980s and 1990s albums, and the last album featuring songs co-written with lyricist Gary Osborne. Recorded on the West Indian island of Montserrat, "Jump Up!" truly captures Elton at one of his happiest moments in the 1980s, backed ably by a fine studio band which included long-time associate, bassist Dee Murray, and legendary studio session drummer Jeff Porcaro, best known for his work with his band Toto and of course, with Michael Jackson too. The album harkens back to Elton's early to mid 1970s sound, with an eclectic range of pop ballads and uptempo rockers. The two songs which most listeners will recognize are the Elton John/Gary Osborne ballad "Blue Eyes", which was recorded later by none other than Frank Sinatra, and the Elton John/Bernie Taupin ballad "Empty Garden (Hey Hey Johnny)", which is Elton's bittersweet homage to the late John Lennon; both songs still rank as among the finest ballads ever composed by Elton in his nearly forty-year long career. And yet these aren't the only fine songs on "Jump Up!"; even the song which I regard as the weakest on the album, the Elton John/Bernie Taupin ballad "All Quiet On The Western Front" - the songwriting team's musical tribute to World War One's Western Front - I'd regard as one of their most memorable compositions. In other words, "Jump Up!Read more ›
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Keith T. Pells on July 19, 2003
Format: Audio CD
A year after 1981's somewhat tepid response to that year's majestic and stately album "The Fox" (see my review for that album), Elton John broke out of the gate with "Jump Up!". While "The Fox" was subdued and understated, "Jump Up!" came out rocking and fun. Recorded in Montsarrat, it feels like an album that was recorded at leisure while on holiday.
From the thundering opening drums of "Dear John", the album as a whole is upbeat. Only the two American Singles "Empty Garden (Hey Hey Johnny)" and "Blue Eyes" were ballads. "Dear John" rocked harder and louder than anything he'd done since "Rock Of The Westies" (though not quite as hard as 1984's "Li'l Frigerator" from the "Breaking Hearts" album (see my review for that album)).
Like the "21 At 33" album (see my review for that album), the arrangements and production values were crisp and pointed. The piano in "Spiteful Child" has punch to it, the synth-solo in the Summer-y "Princess" (released as a single outside the United States) has a sense of urgency.
But every now and then, John surprises his listeners and records a "period piece". A track that highlights the musical flavourings of the moment without going overboard (NOTE TO JOHN: I'd love to hear an all instrumental album from you someday). Prime examples up to this point were disco (from the "Victim Of Love" album - DEFINETELY see my review of that album) and Philly-Soul from "The Thom Bell Sessions".
With "Jump Up!", the period piece is "I Am Your Robot". With elements of electronica and industrial along the lines of A Flock Of Seagulls' "I Ran", "I Am Your Robot" remains one of my favorite John tracks. Only John can give credibility to lyrics like "I am your robot, I'm programmed to love you...my serial number is 4-4-3-5-7". Great stuff!
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