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June 29, 1999 Paperback – September 18, 1995


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers; Reissue edition (September 18, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0395727677
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395727676
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 9.9 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #75,367 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

If you liked David Wiesner's surrealistic 1992 Caldecott Medalist Tuesday, then June 29, 1999 will send your spirits soaring like a frog on a flying lily pad. This wacky Wiesner creation chronicles an astonishing cross-country phenomenon on June 29, 1999. About a month earlier, on May 11, 1999, young Holly Evans launches vegetable seedlings into the sky from her home in Ho-ho-kus, New Jersey--on seed flats with Acme weather balloons. She expects the plants to stay aloft for a few weeks, allowing her to study the effects of extraterrestrial conditions on their growth and development.

On June 29, 1999, curious things start to happen all over America. A hiker in Montana finds giant turnips in the Rocky Mountains. "Cucumbers circle Kalamazoo. Lima beans loom over Levittown. Artichokes advance on Anchorage." TV news channels announce that arugula has covered Ashtabula, which puzzles Holly, because arugula is not part of her experiment. In fact, she is forced to conclude that none of the enlarged specimen sightings are a result of her initial seedling launch. Where did the giant vegetables come from then? Wiesner waits until the last pages to deliver the punch line. Throughout the book, his visual humor interplays perfectly with the sophisticated though minimal text. (A Mount Rushmore-like scene reveals the faces of Reagan, Bush, Nixon, and Carter carved out of giant potatoes with the caption "Potatoland is wisely abandoned.") This beautifully composed ode to absurdity makes us all wish we really could see parsnips over Providence. Awards and other recognition: 1993 ALA Notable Book, School Library Journal Best Books of 1992, Fanfare 1993: Horn Book's Outstanding Books of the Year, Publishers Weekly 50 Best Books of 1992, New York Times Notable Books of the Year 1992. (Ages 5 and older) --Karin Snelson --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

PW's boxed review found this quirky picture book from the Caldecott Medalist "spectacular to look at, great fun to read [and] executed with consumate skill." Ages 5-up.
- executed with consumate skill." Ages 5-up.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

David Wiesner is one of the best-loved and most highly acclaimed picture book creators in the world. His books have been translated into more than a dozen languages and have won numerous awards in the United States and abroad. Three of the picture books he both wrote and illustrated became instant classics when they won the prestigious Caldecott Medal: Tuesday in 1992, The Three Pigs in 2002, and Flotsam in 2007, making him only the second person in the award's long history to have won three times. He has also received two Caldecott Honors, for Free Fall and Sector 7.

Wiesner grew up in suburban New Jersey, known to his classmates as "the kid who could draw." He went on to become a student at the Rhode Island School of Design, where he was able to commit himself to the full-time study of art and to explore further his passion for visual storytelling. He soon discovered that picture books were the perfect vehicle for his work.

Wiesner generally spends several years creating each new book. Many versions are sketched and revised until the story line flows smoothly and each image works the way he wants it to. He creates three-dimensional models of objects he can't observe in real life, such as flying pigs and lizards standing upright, to add authenticity to his drawings.

David Wiesner lives with his family outside Philadelphia.

Customer Reviews

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His use of color in combination with his attention to detail, make his pictures bring this story to life.
Alicia, Jill, & Katherine
David Wiesner has a fine sense of imagination.
Kathy Tollenaere

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By "winifredfroglette" on June 14, 2000
Format: Hardcover
By April, most of the children in my kindergarten knew that they had learned absolutely everything about David Wiesner's "Tuesday". I surprised them one Tuesday, with this book, and let them know it was by the same author. "Will there be frogs?" the children clamored. We shared the book, and with growing excitement some of the children exclaimed as we turned the page and I read the date, "That's your birthday! Did Mr. David, the author know that? Did he put it there 'cuz he knows you love frogs and his Tuesday book?"
I must confess, I do not know how the author chose that date to evaluate plants.
This book was a hit in my classroom, a treasured favorite, even though it was a bit beyond K level scientific data collections. We planted seeds, and of course, the children adored the ending, which i shall not give away. We did many extension activities such as veggie trays and a big salad day. Bring this book to your classroom, or your home, and celebrate an oft ignored part of the food pyramid.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Roz Levine on August 26, 2002
Format: Hardcover
It all started in Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey on May 11, 1999. Holly Evans launched her science experiment, flats of vegetable seedlings carried up into the ionosphere by weather balloons, to study "the effects of extra-terrestrial conditions on vegetable growth and development." Fast forward to June 29. All over the country, enormous vegetables are seen floating to earth. "Cucumbers circle Kalamazoo. Lima bearns loom over Levittown. Artichokes advance on Anchorage. Parsnips pass by Providence. And broccoli lands with a big bounce in Holly Evans's backyard." But when "arugula covers Ashtabula" , Holly begins to wonder about this veggie phenomenon. Arugula was not a part of her experiment..... David Wiesner's makes June 29th an unforgettable day in his entertaining classic, and imaginations will soar with each delightful page turn. His minimal text, with its witty, dead-pan delivery, is filled with clever wordplay and alliteration. But it's Mr Wiesner's marvelous illustrations that really make this book stand out and sparkle, and youngsters will enjoy lingering over each outrageously detailed and humorous picture. With an inventive twist at the end to bring the whole story to its logical, though fantastic, conclusion, June 29, 1999 is a masterpiece you and your family don't want to miss.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 12, 1999
Format: Hardcover
A beautiful science fiction story that is a superb springboard for an integrated unit. Teachers have used it from the graduate level courses to elementary school classes. Teachers & students wants to test Holly's science experiment for themselves to see if they can grow giant veggies!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Alicia, Jill, & Katherine on May 20, 2008
Format: Paperback
David Wiesner's June 29, 1999 tells the story of Holly Evans who decides to conduct a science experiment that involves the launching of vegetable seedlings into outer space. Seven days later, Holly presents her science experiment to her class, explaining that she is trying to experiment with "extra-terrestrial conditions on vegetables." Holly's experiment causes a chain of events to occur that challenge what is scientifically possible. A few months after presenting her experiment to her class, giant vegetables are spotted in the sky. However, Holly notices that some of these giant vegetables are different from ones that she launched. Thinking that her experiment failed, Holly wonders where the other vegetables came from. At the end of the book, the reader learns that aliens were cooking and accidentally released their vegetables into outer space. The aliens, worried that they no longer have any food, rejoice when they see Holly's vegetables arrive. It turns out that Holly's experiment was successful after all!
This book is an excellent example of science fiction because it demonstrates the impact science can have when it is implemented in an extraordinary and imaginative ways. One thing that makes this book so incredible is Wiesner's brilliant illustrations. His use of color in combination with his attention to detail, make his pictures bring this story to life. Because Wiesner does such an excellent job of depicting the giant vegetables, it is easy to imagine the affects of Holly's experiment. One of the reasons why this book is considered science fiction is because it revolves around a " what if" scenario, in other words an experiment. It was Holly's curiosity and desire to see what would happen if she launched seedlings in the sky that caused the chain of event to occur.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on May 3, 2007
Format: Paperback
In the story June 29, 1999 Holly experiments with making plants grow in outer space. Then one day she goes to school and shows her class her experiment. The class is speechless. Then on June 29, 1999 a hiker goes on a hike and sees giant turnips. In Ottumwa Tony Kramer thinks he grows the giant lettuce. Then on TV Holly was shocked at what she saw. One night Holly was wondering who sent the giant vegetables down. Do you know who sent the giant vegetables to earth? You might be surprised. I think that the story was great and it was funny at the end once you know who sent the giant vegetables.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By HA on January 12, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have read this book to my son, who is 4 years old, several times. He loved it. The cover of the book was not very appealing for him at first. But, the story was very interesting and he loved the pictures inside the book. I would definetely recommend it to everyone. It is an imaginative and fun book...
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