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Jungle Tales of Tarzan Hardcover – July, 2003

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

The first time I ever went to Tarzana, California, I walked down Ventura Boulevard, noticing that all of the buildings were really ugly. Then I arrive at my destination: a small house, set back from the street, with a beautiful tree shading the entire front yard. Inside, the air was cool and everything was polished wood, especially the incredible, gigantic desk. That's where he worked. It was awesome.

Edgar Rice Burroughs had a huge California ranch, and the land eventually became a town, named for Burroughs's most famous character. Burroughs created one of the few heroes everyone knows, and at that desk, he took Tarzan to exotic lands, had him face bizarre creatures and endless, exotic challenges. Those adventures spirit the reader away to a timeless time of action and heroism. And sitting in that office, I was a permanent convert. For me, and for countless others, the legend will never cease. And that's as it should be.
                        --Steve Saffel, Senior Editor --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

The young Tarzan was unlike the great apes who were his only companions and playmates. Theirs was a simple, savage life, filled with little but killing or being killed. But Tarzan had all of a normal boy's desire to learn, and he had painfully taught himself to read from books left by his dead father. Now he tried to apply this book knowledge to the world of the jungle.
He sought for such things as the source of dreams and the whereabouts of God. And he searched for the love and affection that every human being needs. But he was alone in his struggles to grow and understand -- and the life of the jungle had no room for abstractions. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 188 pages
  • Publisher: IndyPublish.com (July 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1404368051
  • ISBN-13: 978-1404368057
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.7 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,326,533 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By David Ullery on October 30, 2003
Format: Paperback
Most of the reviews written here are not for Burne Hogarth's "Jungle Tales of Tarzan" but are for the original Tarzan novel by Burroughs and not the beautiful Burne Hogarth comic book/trade paperback 1976 adaptation. I now own the Burne Hogarth edition and love it. It is boldly done and Hogarth's art is at its best and most detailed. The only drawback is that it is not colored---it is only black and white---and only available in paperback (unlike the hardback and colored 1972 "Tarzan of the Apes" Burroughs/Hogarth edition). Still it is a pleasure to behold, and is larger than the 1972 "Tarzan of the Apes" edition. About half of the tales in Burroughs' original "Jungle Tales of Tarzan" are there. The forward is interesting and shows some pages from both Hogarth/Burroughs' books. Burne Hogarth definately brings Burroughs' amazing works to life like no one else. A perfect match. Hogarth is to comic book art as Frank Frazetta is to paperback covers.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on May 21, 2005
Format: Paperback
"Jungle Tales of Tarzan" is the sixth volume in the Tarzan series by Edgar Rice Burroughs and pretty much goes back to the beginning for a collection of short stories set in the time when Tarzan still lived among the great apes. Tarzan has learned how to read from the books he has found and it is opening his young mind to new questions, like where do dreams come from and where he can confront Goro, the supreme being that is the moon. There is also the love triangle between Tarzan, his first love Teeka, and their rival Taug, as well as his adventures tormenting the people of the local Mbonga tribe.

"Jungle Tales of Tarzan" is actually a nice companion volume to the original "Tarzan of the Apes," provide more depth and detail to the early years of the Lord of the Jungle. It also marks a coda to what we would now consider the original story arc of the Tarzan novels. Burroughs would write another 21 Tarzan novels but they would become increasingly formulaic. In many ways this is the last time we would see the original Tarzan; you can think of "Jungle Tales of Tarzan" as sort of being the "deleted scenes" from the original "Tarzan of the Apes" novel. This particular edition also features ilustrations by J. St. John Allen, always considered the best of ERB's original artists.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on March 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
"Jungle Tales of Tarzan" is the sixth volume in the Tarzan series by Edgar Rice Burroughs and pretty much goes back to the beginning for a collection of short stories set in the time when Tarzan still lived among the great apes. Tarzan has learned how to read from the books he has found and it is opening his young mind to new questions, like where do dreams come from and where he can confront Goro, the supreme being that is the moon. There is also the love triangle between Tarzan, his first love Teeka, and their rival Taug, as well as his adventures tormenting the people of the local Mbonga tribe. "Jungle Tales of Tarzan" is actually a nice companion volume to the original "Tarzan of the Apes," provide more depth and detail to the early years of the Lord of the Jungle. It also marks a coda to what we would now consider the original story arc of the Tarzan novels. Burroughs would write another 21 Tarzan novels but they would become increasingly formulaic. In many ways this is the last time we would see the original Tarzan; you can think of "Jungle Tales of Tarzan" as sort of being the "deleted scenes" from the original "Tarzan of the Apes" novel.
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By David Adams on January 22, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
One of the most fascinating Tarzan books to his fans. The stories fit into the first Tarzan novel, Tarzan of the Apes, as an expansion of his life before he met people from the outside world. Its a nice little account of what a feral child might think, but of course, highly romanticized. If you enjoy this book, you will love The Son of Tarzan which explores these themes from the standpoint of a child raised in civilization who returns to live in the wild.
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By J. Mentzer on June 12, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Having read all of the Tarzan novels as a kid, I decided to re-read the very best of 'em. "Jungle Tales" is definitely one. After publishing the first few (previously serialized) novels, Burroughs' editors collected a series of short stories about the jungle lord's youth. Jungle Tales of Tarzan is the result.

First love and attaining rank among the tribe are but two of the excellent stories here. Great stuff!
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Martin Asiner on August 13, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When Tarzan became a household world, readers of Edgar Rice Burroughs began to pester him to write about a more personalized, more gossipy side of the apeman. ERB obliged his fans by writing a dozen stories that detail his growing up in Africa during his teenage years. In JUNGLE TALES OF TARZAN, ERB portrays a Tarzan that might have fit in well in any number of television sitcoms or domestic dramas. This Tarzan shows a side to his development that is only hinted at in the events of the first novel of the series, TARZAN ON THE APES, in whose events it runs concurrently.
Many of the same themes and plot devices that run through the entire series are explored here, several of which show ERB at his literary best and worst. Plotting and pacing are ERB's strongpoints. He constantly captures the interest of his readers with exotic yet believable storylines. Yet, his insistence on coincidence to make his plots mesh combined with more than a touch of blatant racism intrude to the point that if ERB published his books today, a formidable array of political correctness would howl for his scalp.
The first story, "Tarzan's First Love," describes a teenage Tarzan who has a love crush on a lovely gorilla female named Teeka. Tarzan declares his love for her, and battles a childhood chum for her favors. By the story's end, Tarzan recognizes the genetic differences and reluctantly gives her up. What is of interest here, is the psychological battle that he goes through. More than once, ERB mentions the impact that Kala, Tarzan's foster ape mother, has had on Tarzan, an impact that endures throughout the entire series. There is a strong Oedipal undercurrent as Tarzan compares the love for Teeka with that of his love for the deceased Kala.
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