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  • New Junk Aesthetic [Vinyl]
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New Junk Aesthetic [Vinyl]

11 customer reviews

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Vinyl, October 13, 2009
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Editorial Reviews

Every Time I Die is a Southern Hardcore Rock band from Buffalo, New York, founded in the winter of 1998. Across a series of five albums, they have defined a scene, with their unique blend of metalcore, punk, and Southern rock.

1. Roman Holiday
2. The Marvelous Slut
3. Who Invited The Russian Soldier?
4. Wanderlust
5. For The Record
6. White Smoke
7. Turtles All The Way Down
8. Organ Grinder
9. Host Disorder
10. After One Quarter Of A Revolution
11. The Sweet Life
12. Buffalo 666
13. Goddam Kids These Days

Product Details

  • Vinyl (October 13, 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Epitaph
  • ASIN: B002JODUJS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #59,152 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

5 star
55%
4 star
45%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Sheri A. Bodnicki on September 16, 2009
Format: Audio CD
To begin, I would rate Every Time I Die's album a 4.5/5. It's not perfect, but pretty darn good for sure.

Now, time to critique...

This, without a doubt, is a new sounding album. It's identifiably different from any other work ETID has done in the past, but it still holds true to their sound and style. The Southern Sound is there, and so are the heavy riffs and belching yells; yet it has a different flavor. I've only had the CD for two days now and listened to each song between 4-8 times, but that does not stop me from noticing a few differences in this album when compared to ETID's past work:

1) The guitars have a different sound. I cannot pin-point it, but when paired up against The Big Dirty or The Gutter Phenomenon, they just sound different. Maybe a slightly different tuning? I don't know for certain, but it sure does produce a darker and heavier sound. Also, the dual guitars are not as prevalent. In most of the songs it sounds like only one guitar did the recording. I'm not sure why, for I loved the intricacy of the dual guitars in The Big Dirty and The Gutter Phenomenon. Don't get me wrong, the riffs are intricate and definitely don't disappoint, just different.

2) The drumming is more intense in this album without a doubt. It's faster, more complex, and just plain great.

3) Keith does something different with his lyrical duties on this album. Overall, I don't really like The New Junk Aesthetic's lyrics as much as ETID's other albums. In over half of his songs he repeats the same lines over and over. The repetition may work sometimes, but it gets old when it is occurring in every song. Another thing Keith changed was the range of his screams. He seems to have extended his range or something.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By K. Wezwick on June 4, 2010
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
I don't know what their other albums stand like, I'm not a fan of Every Time I Die in that I've never listened to them before so I can't rate this album in the context of their corpus.

But as an album, on it's own, it's great.

Technical without being obnoxious and groovy at the same time. The lyrics are insightful, the vocals are screamed intelligibly and every track brings something to the table.

Also taken as a whole, the album has a progression from beginning to end. Not a concept album, just a nicely laid out collection of songs with a coherent path.

A solid metal album that stands on its own.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By G. Swartzell on December 1, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Keith Buckley may not be the Ernest Hemingway of our generation, but he certainly shares some similarities. His lyrics on New Junk Aesthetic are the misanthropic poetry of a bitter old man, ridden with anger, self doubt, and bitter resignation. Musically, the guitar work is complex without being inaccessible, the drums serve their purpose without screaming for attention, and the bass lurks in the background, making little contributions here and there but generally going unnoticed. This album gets 4 stars out of 5, as 1) I could use a little more from the bass and 2) I'd like to hear more singing from Keith. A great listen for the drunk and/or bitter.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By AndrewLJohns on March 5, 2012
Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
Not quite my favorite ETID album, but with these guys it's hard for me to pick one. They seem to be able to keep their specific stylized sound while changing motif for every album. I bought this on CD the day it was released and now I've just gotten the vinyl. My only beef is that the vinyl disc was defective upon arrival but thats not ETID's fault and it's not the seller's fault. No worries.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David N. Goliath on May 13, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
ETID seems to be sticking with the formula that has been working with them. That is a formula that always finds it's way into my workout playlist. The artwork included with this album is aesthetically appealing and done by one of the band members... props to you fine sir. The DVD has a couple laughs in it.
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Format: Audio CD
Only an exceedingly few math and hardcore bands - and, moreover, an even smaller number of metalcore outfits - ever wind-up being as consistent as Every Time I Die. And how does ETID follow-up such a string of good releases -2003's excellent "Hot D," "Gutter Phenomenon" (Ought-Five's commercial breakthrough), and `07's solid "The Big Dirty" -- you ask? Well, naturally, any band worth its salt knows the answer to that is simple: Make another one! So, on full-length number five, this bunch of New York-based math/noise-obsessed moshers once again reaffirm the belief that they implanted in everyone's mind long- ago of being amongst the upper-crust in any and all of the above sub-genres of the new millennium.

Of course, there is something that sounds a touch different about 2009's "New Junk Aesthetic." This "something" can be described in short as the following: Fusing-in a concertedly increased use (and, at times, fairly heavy) progressive rock and traditional metal influences into the mix. Therefore, the musical arrangements have made a slight improvement in the harmonic and musicality departments. That said, as is the case with anything ETID have ever written, this album is first-and-foremost a heavy, abrasive, and punishing one. Hence, any such experimental touches or melodic leanings may darn well take more-than-one listen to dissect and fully unveil and appreciate. Don't get me wrong: Those moments are definitely present, here -- they are just quite easy to overlook, meaning you just have to be on a close-enough attentive look-out for them.

Of course, "N.J.A." does begin in absolutely brutal fashion.
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