Customer Reviews


386 Reviews
5 star:
 (295)
4 star:
 (79)
3 star:
 (7)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


48 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No, you can't put this book down.
My mom got me hooked on mystery novels and certain writers and I sure wish she was still around so I could introduce her to Craig Johnson and the citizens of Absaroka County, Wyoming. His first novel, "The Cold Dish", enthralled me and I fell in love with Sheriff Walt Longmire, Henry Standing Bear and Deputy Sheriff Vic. And now "Junkyard Dogs" has opened the door, again,...
Published on May 30, 2010 by QueenKatieMae

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Junkyard dogs and Jim Croce
At last I have found a mystery writer who combines all the elements of a good read - enticing story filled with compelling characters, subplots that thread through his other books, humor, references to trivia that some will get and elusive to others (makes me wonder what I'm missing). In this story there are junkyard dogs (reference Jim Croce) and human foibles and of...
Published 1 month ago by Camille Kazadi


‹ Previous | 1 239 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

48 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No, you can't put this book down., May 30, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
My mom got me hooked on mystery novels and certain writers and I sure wish she was still around so I could introduce her to Craig Johnson and the citizens of Absaroka County, Wyoming. His first novel, "The Cold Dish", enthralled me and I fell in love with Sheriff Walt Longmire, Henry Standing Bear and Deputy Sheriff Vic. And now "Junkyard Dogs" has opened the door, again, to a small part of the world filled with unforgettable characters, humorous interactions and starkly beautiful scenery. His mysteries are always fun to try and untangle before the end. But. it's his writing and sense of the absurd that makes me laugh out loud. When a book starts out with "I tried to get a straight answer from his grandson and granddaughter-in-law as to why their grandfather had been tied with a hundred feet of nylon rope to the rear bumper of the 1968 Oldsmobile Toronado:...well, I know my mom would have wanted to keep reading. Damn good book
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read!, June 16, 2010
"Junkyard Dogs" is Craig Johnson's sixth book in his Walt Longmire mystery series and as always he doesn't disappoint his many fans. In "Junkyard Dogs" we are again reunited with Sheriff Longmire and the citizens of Absaroka County but in the first chapter we are introduced to some new characters and I mean characters! Within the first few pages I was laughing out loud. Craig is a master wordsmith and a natural born storyteller. As you read his books you may find yourself going back over different passages because they are so poetic. In "Junkyard Dogs" Johnson's description of a certain house is reminiscent of works by Edgar Allen Poe. And how many Western Mysteries do you see Rasputin mentioned? In his books Johnson has proven himself to be one of the best mystery writers today. From the first to the last page of "Junkyard Dogs" Craig will take you on a literary ride and then you will eagerly be anticipating his next book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absolutely splendid series of novels, June 15, 2011
A Review of the Entire Series:

I became interested in knowing more about the Walt Longmire Mysteries after learning that it was going to be made into a TNT series starring Katee Sackhoff, who was in one of my all-time favorite series, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA. So I picked up THE COLD DISH and then DEATH WITHOUT COMPANY and then KINDNESS GOES UNPUNISHED and so on through ANOTHER MAN'S MOCASSINS, A DARK HORSE, JUNKYARD DOGS, and on to Craig Johnson's latest offering to the series, HELL IS EMPTY.

I can't express how impressed I am with this series of novels. There are a couple of things to point out.

First, none of these books are written by a formula. About the only thing each novel has in common with the others is that Walt Longmire, the sheriff of Absaroka County, gets battered and beaten in each one. The one ongoing joke, for lack of a better word, in each book is how much physical punishment Walt undergoes. But the novels themselves differ starkly from one to another. Most series reenact the same novel again and again, with only minor alterations from one book to the next. But Craig Johnson clearly refuses to take the easy path, but insists on working hard to create something new each time.

Second, these books are driven by character and are not whodunits. There are mysteries to be solved, but these are not the heart of each book. Most of the novels focus on a series of character portraits of an ensemble cast, but his most recent novel, HELL IS EMPTY focuses on just a couple of characters. But for the most part the books focus on the ensemble. Walt is always front and center because he is the narrator, but we come to know most of the major characters nearly as well, including Victoria "Vic" Moretti, Walt's deputy; his best friend Henry aka "The Cheyenne Nation"; Walt's daughter Cady, the dispatcher Ruby, and many others. The large group of eccentrics making up Walt's world actually reminds me of the town of Cecily, Alaska in NORTHERN EXPOSURE more than it does any other detective or mystery series.

There are a number of other things I really like about the books. I love the literary references. Walt attended USC on a football scholarship, where he was an offensive lineman and majored in Literature (he would have graduated a year before O.J. Simpson arrived and therefore he never blocked for him), and he retains a prodigious knowledge of English language poetry. I'm not a gun guy, but he brings guns into the story in a way that is more fun than usual in such discussions. And you have to love Walt's gentle nature and its contrast with Vic's unrestrained profanity.

The only thing I don't like about the books is the rather stereotyped Indian mysticism. Walt gets visions or prophetic dreams on a regular basis and I generally could have done without all of this. Well, with one exception. I did rather enjoy Virgil in HELL IS EMPTY, his latest book. To give as few spoilers as possible, the book relies heavily on themes and images from Dante's INFERNO, and so it is appropriate that Walt should have a Virgil as his guide, even if Walt himself is well beyond the middle stage of life.

I can't recommend these books strongly enough. I would also strongly recommend reading them in order. That order would be (year of original publication noted - though the books themselves take place in the space of only a year or two):

Cold Dish (2004)
Death Without Company (2006)
Kindness Goes Unpunished (2007)
Another Man's Moccasins (2008)
The Dark Horse (2009)
Junkyard Dogs (2010)
Hell is Empty (2011)

I started off reading these just because of the upcoming television series, but now I love them only for their own sake.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Once again reluctantly leaving Durant, Wyoming, June 22, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
One week a year I get to live in the town of Durant, entertained by Vic, charmed by Henry, and comforted by Walt's warmth, humor and unique way of enforcing the law. I dragged the book out to make my visit last longer, but sadly it's time to leave. Meticulously plotted, an intellectual challenge, funny and thoroughly delightful.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Top Notch Tale in Absaroka County, June 7, 2010
By 
Lisa B. (Sewickley, PA United States) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Craig Johnson is an author that never disappoints. I open up his books and am lost in the characters and beauty of Absaroka County. If Walt Longmire and friends really existed, I'd pack my bags and move there (snow and all).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Have no fear, Ladies...., November 2, 2010
An earlier review indicates the Walt Longmire series is geared towards men, but I disagree. I stumbled on Junkyard Dogs at the library and was hooked from the first few pages. Johnston's writing is beautiful, his references are hip and intellectual, his story is clever, his hero lovable and the females are crazy funny. Having seen all of Wyoming (and loving some of it), I think he's romantized the setting a bit, as well. I fear for the TV version of this series because I'm afraid the charm will be lost without the ability to "see" Johnston's beautiful writing. This is a thoroughly enjoyable read and I would highly recommend it.

My next husband will be Henry Standing Bear :)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Each Book is Better that the last one, August 4, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I do not know what else I acan say other than each one of Craig Johnsons books are better that the last one. I am a fan of Wyoming and I sort of know that area. It is rugged and so is Walt. I like the fact that the main character is smart and experienced. That the main character is able to draw from his past to solve the problems facing him today. There is alot to be said for experience. So writers want to make the older character to be sort of worn out and tired. Walt is that But he is also able to manage his problems with the wisdom he has accumulated over his career.
This is one of my most favorite writers and the series is awesome. I can not wait until the next one is out. In fact I wish he could write them faster... lol...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Junkyard Dogs, September 26, 2010
I have never been much of a reader -regretfully. I guess I had to read so much stuff while I was working I just got sick of it. All of that changed however after I read a trade review on Junkyard Dogs. I thought it would be something that I would find interesting. I purchased it and found that I could not put it down. I could really relate to the story and the characters, especially Walt Longmire. Since then I have purchased the first five books in The Walt Longmire series and have read all of them, in record time by my standards. My wife is amazed that I actually know how to read. I am looking forward to the next edition "Hell Is Empty".
Craig Johnson is a great story teller, this might sound chauvinistic and I really don't mean it to be, but these stories are geared more toward guys likings. However after I finished the series my wife picked them up and is reading them now and she too enjoys them. I think anyone would really enjoy these stories.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Humorous mystery, May 27, 2010
By 
Debbie (Harrison, AR United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
"Junkyard Dogs" is a humorous mystery novel. The first third of the novel was set-up and had more of a general fiction flavor. After the first murder, though, it turned into a fast-paced mystery. The characters were interesting and quirky. The world-building was good. The author avoided my even considering to question "would police really do that?" by having his Sheriff play fast and loose with the rules (much to the dismay of the other characters).

While this was a who-done-it type mystery, the crime and criminal initially seemed obvious, so the Sheriff's method of solving the crime was to follow the most obvious lead as fast as possible and see what happened. As in, there wasn't a lot of stopping to think out who had an opportunity, to study the evidence, etc...though things happened so fast there wasn't much time for that. His method of handling the cases had some funny results.

My only problem with the novel was that the transitions between some scenes weren't very smooth. We'd have two people at a certain place, then in the next scene one of those people was walking in on the other at another place. The explanation of what happened in the time lapse would come, but this sequence (with no transition between the scenes) threw me out of the story.

There was no sex. There was a minor amount of swearing and a fair amount of cussing. Overall, I'd recommend the novel as enjoyable reading.

I received this book as a review copy from the publisher.

Reviewed by Debbie from Genre Reviews
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars First attempt at the Longmire series, November 1, 2013
This review is from: Junkyard Dogs: A Walt Longmire Mystery (Walt Longmire Mysteries Book 6) (Kindle Edition)
I've been looking for a good novelist to read for a while. I'd finished almost all of Connelly's Bosch series and wanted something similar. One day I noticed "Longmire" on Netflix. I watched the entire first season in a few days and was hooked on the adventures of Sherriff Longmire and Absaroka county.

This is the book I started with. Strange choice probably, but it is what my local library had available. Admittedly, the beginning was a little slow to start. Maybe this has to do with me adjusting to his writing style. After I trudged through the first 60 pages, the rest went fairly quickly. I'm currently reading "As the Crow Flies", which is going much smoother (so far).

Synopsis- This story revolves around the Stewart family and their dump, which is full of old automobile parts. It begins with Geo Stewart being "accidentally" being dragged behind a car. At first you think this might be what the story is all about, but Johnson has much, much more in store for the reader. Somebody kills poor Geo later on, and then someone else kills his killer! As if that's not enough death, the crazies seem to come out of the woodwork and try to through Longmire off of the investigation by any means necessary. By the end of the book the body count starts to pile up for something that seems straightforward. But who ever said things had to be easy?

One major difference between the book version of Longmire versus the TV version is his interest in Vic. Perhaps they simply haven't addressed that yet in the show, but he always seems to be commenting on her figure. In "As the Crow Flies", he also mentions Lolo Long's body as well. None of this has come in to play yet in the series. Maybe season 2 is different?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 239 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.