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72 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Smart And Thought-Provoking With Dinosaur-Sized Thrills
Although all three of the "Jurassic Park" movies were visually spectacular, and although Crichton's "Lost World" followup was a good novel, in my opinion you have to go here, to the original "Jurassic Park" novel, to experience the true greatness of this story.

Probably just about everybody knows the basic premise - scientists clone dinosaurs to create a...
Published on August 10, 2005 by Stephen B. O'Blenis

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Typos galore, don't buy this version
First off, I absolutely love this story - without a doubt it gets 5 stars. Which is what makes the embarrassing number of typos in this edition even more ridiculous. It makes you realize that absolutely no one at the publisher's reads the books after they are printed. It's not like they made a couple simple mistakes, and put "its" instead of "it's" - the...
Published 2 months ago by Wesley Smith


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72 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Smart And Thought-Provoking With Dinosaur-Sized Thrills, August 10, 2005
By 
Stephen B. O'Blenis (Nova Scotia, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Jurassic Park (Hardcover)
Although all three of the "Jurassic Park" movies were visually spectacular, and although Crichton's "Lost World" followup was a good novel, in my opinion you have to go here, to the original "Jurassic Park" novel, to experience the true greatness of this story.

Probably just about everybody knows the basic premise - scientists clone dinosaurs to create a massive theme park on a tropical island, and everything goes terribly awry. What may have been forgotten in the years since its initial release is that this is one of the most thrilling, imagination-igniting, adventurous and frighteningly Believable (an aspect which didn't quite make it through to the film versions; most of the ethical questions, pro and con, also struggled to be heard in the movies) novels ever written. In quoting early on actual tinkerings with the biological makeup of living things for man's scientific curiosity and potential profit, the book made it seem not only plausible that this could happen, but that, if this was in Any Way possible that it could happen, that someday, somehow, somebody is actually going to go and do something like this. Not necesarily a dinosaur theme park (although who knows?) but some kind of cloning/genetic engineering scheme on this gargantuan scale. And this book was written Before humanity started cloning sheep, cats, dogs and whatever else strikes its fancy (with huge rates of failure in terms of deformities and early deaths that just get swept under the rug), before the longtime specter of genetically engineering 'designer children' started to become feasible, and, if I have my dates right, before it was known that if somebody wanted to go ahead and attempt this we don't even need to go through amber-trapped insects for prehistoric DNA; we already have reasonably well-preserved, non-fossilized dinosaur marrow. And the scientific community has been openly talking for years now about cloning mammoths from fresh specimens that were frozen in the last ice age.

To get off the subject of the book's plausibility and its connection to current real-life states of affairs in ethical and scientific circumstances, and get back to the book's own merits, this is one of Crichton's alltime gems. Vivid desciptions of everything that make you feel like you're there, deeper and better characterization than in some of his earlier works, and some of the most amazing chase scenes and 'first appearance' of the monster' type scenes ever written, with more implied 'what if's and (that the author wisely doesn't than you can shake a Sauropod tail at. It's also worth noting that not all of the dinosaurs are ferocious; some are non-threatening, even charmingly oafish.

Captivating from the get-go; hand a copy of this to a person who's never willingly (that means school assignments excluded) read a full novel and you might get a book-lover for life. Other recommended Crichton titles: "The Andromeda Strain", "Sphere" and especially "Congo" (his other crowning achievement). Also recommended in the dinosaur novel genre: "Raptor Red" by Robert T. Bakker, taking place in the Cretaceous. "Balook" by Piers Anthony is another great book, involving prehistoric mammals instead of dinosaurs, and offering one of the few reasonable theoretical arguements in favor of cloning I've ever encountered.
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51 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blows The Movie Away, July 4, 2000
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This review is from: Jurassic Park: A Novel (Mass Market Paperback)
It's a shame that a lot of people won't read this book because they saw the movie and thought it was stupid. Yes, it was a pretty good movie, but this book is a lot better, simply because it focuses more on the scientific and character development aspects, rather than pure thrills and suspense (not that there isn't any of that). Also, the movie didn't follow the book at all, there are many parallels between the two. What's cool about this book is that dinosaurs aren't definately a part of the story until over 100 pages into the book! Indeed, if the movie was not so famous and you had just read the book first, you might not have known it was about dinosaurs until rather far into it (but the title of course, gives it away). But just look at the explanation of how the dinosaurs were created, among the various other scientific aspects of the book, everything is explained in painstaking detail, without ever becoming boring. Crichton really did his homework on this one.
If you are putting off reading this book because you think it is some stupid and unrealistic fantasy about the rebirth of dinosaurs, then not only are you totally wrong, you are missing out. This is a must read.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favorite books, July 17, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Jurassic Park (Hardcover)
I saw the movie 'Jurassic Park' when I was about ten years old and I liked it, I guess, but I mean, I was TEN, I didn't really understand all the scientific stuff. Just a few months ago, I read the book and I absolutely LOVED it! At first, I was wary about reading it, it had a lot of techno science talk in it which I thought I wouldn't understand, but I did get the basic idea and I thought the book was fantastic! It is suspensful and really enjoyable. I recommended it to my friends, but they were like "Why would you want to read THAT?" (I'm a thirteen-year-old girl and they were like...whatEVER!) But I really really liked it. I love the movie too, but the book is more thrilling, if you ask me. I don't see how anyone could not like the movie though and refuse to read the book afterward. The movie was excellent too.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Can't Put it Down, June 12, 2004
By 
Marcos Helms (Los Angeles, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Jurassic Park: A Novel (Mass Market Paperback)
Sometimes, in reading science fiction books, readers get lost in the scientific mumbo-jumbo of it all. Other times, the story is the predominant feature and the scientific parts of the book are overlooked. Jurassic Park is one of the rare books that pleases both perspectives. While some of the ideas are far-fetched (what sci-fi book doesn't have those?), the story makes it all believable and entertaining at the same time. The book was so well-written that it puts the movie version to shame! Even Steven Spielberg (in my opinion) could not capture all the book had to offer. This is a quick read that could be completed in a weekend or over a few nights. This made me a Michael Crichton fan!
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20 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Crichton's Best?, May 17, 2000
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This review is from: Jurassic Park: A Novel (Mass Market Paperback)
It's been a few years since I've read this book, but it still stands out to me as one of my favorite works of (modern) fiction. This book is very fast paced and when I read it, I had a really hard time putting it down. I read it cover to cover almost non-stop. I can imagine this book becoming a little more popular again with all the talk of cloning going on and while the ideas in this book are far-fetched, I'm sure it will help some people make opinions on whether or not cloning is good or bad. So, if you're looking for a great, faced paced sci-fi thriller, you may want to pick up Jurassic Park. I also feel the book is much better than the movie despite the fact that Spielberg directed JP in 1991. The story line is MUCH more devolped and the ending is entirely different! So, if you've seen the movie and liked it and have yet to read the book, I suggest you do - you will definitely enjoy this book.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Raptors And Triceratops And T-Rex.....Oh My!!, April 9, 2007
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This review is from: Jurassic Park: A Novel (Mass Market Paperback)
Okay, so it doesn't quite roll off of the tongue like the famous line from "The Wizard of Oz," but Michael Crichton's "Jurassic Park" runs through a very similar vein of tall tales. It's the story of dinosaurs who are forced into a new world that they are unaccustomed to. So what does a T-Rex do in a strange new environment? The exact same thing it did so many millions of years ago. It eats everything in its path. Crichton tackles the very touchy arena of ethics in science. Should we do something for profit or scientific advancement no matter what the consequences might be? Is it always good to bring something back that's extinct? What happens when you try to control a living thing by denying it certain necessities? All of this and more is answered in this Crichton page-turner-turned-mega-movie.

The book, as is almost always the case, is much better than the film, and that's saying a lot considering how excellent the film adaptation of "Jurassic Park" was. It really captured the primary message of the book. I won't go into any deep detail since most people have either read the book already or have watched the film, but I will say that the book has much better character and story development. There are a few surprises as well in the overall outcome of the story. Characters that have minute or non-existent roles in the film are expanded upon in the book, and the list of survivors doesn't necessarily include all of the group from the film. In fact, I'm glad that a couple of characters had different fates on the page than they did on the screen.

Overall, this is an excellent book. Crichton crafted a wonderful science fiction thriller that is just as suspenseful as the flick and is better as a whole. If you're looking for sci-fi thrills, ethical arguments, and even a few scientific facts, "Jurassic Park" is just what Dr. Grant ordered.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I don't think that's tomato juice...., May 4, 2005
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Jurassic Park: A Novel (Mass Market Paperback)
Jurassic Park is a gripping action title set on a private island of the coast of Costa Rica. Horrific and deep,it should please anybody with the ability to read.i couldnt put it down for all the tea in china, nor all the chinese waitresses who bring it.

John hammond is hungry to make something extraordinary.dealing with boigenetic company,ingen,they manage to create genetically engineered dinosaurs.hammond has an idea of having a dinosaur zoo where kids can marvel at these amazing creatures.unfortunately, his view doesn't include reality, and ingen comes across many problems creating this "zoo".

the way crichton writes is sheer genious.the words seem to flow together and, in time, you'll feel as if it's happening before your eyes.A modern classic written like Shakespeare for old people, jurassic park should not be missed by anybody.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fantasically Frightening Book, October 12, 2005
By 
David Kidwell (Northampton, MA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Jurassic Park: A Novel (Mass Market Paperback)
"Jurassic Park" is Michael Crichton's best book, and that's saying a lot. The idea of bringing dinosaurs back to life will resonate with anyone who has ever been fascinated by these amazing creatures. Crichton's science, although fictional, seems so utterly plausible, and that makes it all the more magical and frightening. The writing is smooth and fluid, moving seamlessly from one episode to the next, and eventually effortlessly weaving several storylines together. The reader is hooked from the very first page. Don't start this book late at night!

The only places where the action lags is when the character of Ian Malcolm discourses on scientific and environmental ethics. The character is obviously a mouthpiece for Crichton himself, and although the ideas he presents are definitely thought-provoking, they come off as a little preachy and heavy-handed.

This is a terrific book, full of suspense, clever ideas, and likeable characters.
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28 of 38 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Crichton's novel is far darker, gorier than 1993 film....., February 28, 2004
This review is from: Jurassic Park: A Novel (Mass Market Paperback)
Nowadays, the title "Jurassic Park" conjures up images from a trilogy of films which began with Steven Spielberg's apatosaurus-sized blockbuster and started going (quality-wise, at least) down the path to cinematic extinction with wan sequels (The Lost World, Jurassic Park III -- the latter, thank Gene Siskel's soul, NOT directed by Spielberg). This, of course, is to be expected and is not exactly a new concept in Hollywood; Jaws, which was Spielberg's first real blockbuster (and is in fact the grandfather of the modern "monster hit movie") also started out as a decent horror film about a predator with sharp teeth that, um, snacked on people...and should have, like its 1993 cinematic heir, should have been left as a stand-alone film.
What some people tend to forget is that both these franchise-starting Spielberg films were adaptations of best-selling summer-season beach reads (Jaws, for instance, was written by Peter Benchley). Not meant to be literary classics in the same category as, say, the collected works of William Shakespeare or Ernest Hemingway, Benchley's shark novel and Michael Crichton's original 1990 novel, Jurassic Park, are an entertaining -- if easily disposed of -- mix of science, horror, and melodrama.
Crichton's novel contains the same basic premise as the screenplay he later co-wrote with David Koepp (The Lost World): eccentric billionaire John Hammond, through his huge bio-genetics company InGen, funds a top secret scientific project to clone dinosaurs from fossilized DNA and populate the Mother of All Theme Attractions, Jurassic Park. But after a series of incidents that Hammond manages to keep hidden from public view (velociraptors snack on unsuspecting Costa Rican laborers, for instance), InGen's board of directors sends attorney Donald Gennaro and a team of independent observers to inspect Hammond's theme park on Isla Nublar off the coast of Costa Rica. Their mission: to evaluate Jurassic Park's safety measures and its viability as a money-making tourist attraction.
As in the movie, everything that can go wrong, does, especially as a result of a deliberate act of computerized sabotage by greedy and super-geeky Dennis Nedry, who has been hired by InGen's rival Biosys Inc. to steal some dino-embryos from Jurassic Park's cryogenic storage facilities. This, of course, places Gennaro's team of Alan Grant, Ellie Sattler, and Ian Malcolm in peril (along with Hammond's two grandchildren, Tim and Lex) as they get stranded outside without the protection of the Park's electrified fences. And, as in the movie, the main characters learn one simple yet painful lesson: people and dinosaurs shouldn't mix.
Crichton's novel is far darker than its 1993 film adaptation, with more nods to Stephen King than to Steven Spielberg, with more scenes of gore and violent death than would have been viable for a PG-13 film. Nevertheless, it's entertaining without being too bogged down in the nitty-gritty details of genetic engineering, industrial espionage, or computer sciences, although Crichton, as he has done in other works (The Terminal Man, The Andromeda Strain) touches all these topics in this fast-moving techno-chiller.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow., March 12, 2006
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Jurassic Park: A Novel (Mass Market Paperback)
As I read the snippets of reviews at the beginning of Jurassic Park, I expected to be reading one of the masterpieces of science fiction. Though it may not be that, Jurassic Park was a nonstop, action-packed book. Chricton has reignited my kindergarten interest in our favorite extinct reptile: dinosaurs.

A group of scientists, who are the best of the best in their respected fields, are invited by an old tycoon to a private island. They find out that he has been building a theme park of epic design. Dinosaurs have been recreated from fossilized DNA, and they are the main attraction of Jurassic Park. Of course, things go wrong(I won't go into the gruesome specifics), and everyone is soon running for their lives.

One of the things that annoyed me was the frequency with which the genius mathematician used situations which are in no way related as examples to back up his chaos theory. The theory itself seems plausible, but the overuse of examples drives me up a wall. The faucet analogy was especially confusing and pointless.

Michael Chricton is a very intelligent man, and he shows it off plenty throughout the book, explaining all the different technicalities of dinosaurs, computers, medicine, and everything else he is an expert on. Fortunately, he doesn't dwell too much on his IQ and quickly returns to weaving an excellent story, so no one stays mad at him for being arrogant too long. If anything was to be taken out of this great book, it would be the introduction, which is not needed and which is way too scientific to be fun.

I like all the characters in this book, major and minor. From the greedy computer programmer to the doubtful geneticist, everyone is realistic and fun. The quarreling brother and sister don't act like kids, but they have not yet achieved the level of seriousness reserved for adults. The tycoon is totally gung ho, never giving up. He's the reason everyone' s lives are at risk, but at the end of a book, you don't hate him any more than the triceratops. The paleontologist who serves as the protagonist is everything you want in a hero: smart, funny, and he actually knows about the thing he's running from.

Jurassic Park may look like another run-of-the-mill sci fi slasher, but it's anything but that. This book has everything a reader could ask for: action, blood and gore, cute baby dinosaurs for the little ones, interesting science facts for the more professional reader, and a quick moving story line that anyone can enjoy. Read it now.
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Jurassic Park: A Novel
Jurassic Park: A Novel by Michael Crichton (Mass Market Paperback - November 13, 1991)
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