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A Jury of Her Peers: American Women Writers from Anne Bradstreet to Annie Proulx Hardcover – Deckle Edge, February 24, 2009


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This Book Is Bound with "Deckle Edge" Paper
You may have noticed that some of our books are identified as "deckle edge" in the title. Deckle edge books are bound with pages that are made to resemble handmade paper by applying a frayed texture to the edges. Deckle edge is an ornamental feature designed to set certain titles apart from books with machine-cut pages. See a larger image.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf; First Edition edition (February 24, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400041236
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400041237
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 6.9 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,311,521 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Book Description
A Jury of Her Peers is an unprecedented literary landmark: the first comprehensive history of American women writers from 1650 to 2000.

In a narrative of immense scope and fascination--brimming with Elaine Showalter’s characteristic wit and incisive opinions--we are introduced to more than 250 female writers. These include not only famous and expected names (Harriet Beecher Stowe, Willa Cather, Dorothy Parker, Flannery O’Connor, Gwendolyn Brooks, Grace Paley, Toni Morrison, and Jodi Picoult among them), but also many who were once successful and acclaimed yet now are little known, from the early American best-selling novelist Catherine Sedgwick to the Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright Susan Glaspell. Showalter shows how these writers--both the enduring stars and the ones left behind by the canon--were connected to one another and to their times. She believes it is high time to fully integrate the contributions of women into our American literary heritage, and she undertakes the task with brilliance and flair, making the case for the unfairly overlooked and putting the overrated firmly in their place.

Whether or not readers agree with the book’s roster of writers, A Jury of Her Peers is an irresistible invitation to join the debate, to discover long-lost great writers, and to return to familiar titles with a deeper appreciation. It is a monumental work that will greatly enrich our understanding of American literary history and culture.

Amazon Exclusive: Elaine Showalter's Top Ten Books by American Women Writers You Haven't Read (But Should)

Everyone knows the handful of novels by American women writers, from Uncle Tom’s Cabin to The House of Mirth and Beloved, that make it onto standard reading lists. But there are hundreds of wonderful books by American women that have been underestimated, overlooked, or forgotten.

Here’s my starting guide to ten extraordinary works of fiction--one from each decade of the twentieth century--that deserve to be much better known.

  • The Country of Lost Borders by Mary Hunter Austin (1909)
    A moving collection of stories emphasizing the California landscape and the vulnerability of women, especially Native American women who were seduced and abandoned by white men in the Wild West. The memorable final story about a mysterious woman in the desert, “The Walking Woman,” is Austin’s manifesto of female independence, equality, tenderness, and sorrow.
  • Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1915)
    Gilman’s clever utopian novel imagines three American men on a scientific expedition who hear tales of a “strange and terrible Woman Land in the high distance,” and decide to find and invade it. Expecting to rule over the women, the men are astounded, entranced, and defeated by the resourcefulness of an all-female society.
  • The Home-Maker by Dorothy Canfield Fisher (1924)
    Fisher was a prolific novelist, a judge for the Book of the Month Club, and a pioneer of Montessori education in the U.S. She claimed that The Home-Maker was more about children’s rights than women’s rights, but she empathized with all the members of a middle-class family whose lives are being destroyed by the straitjacket of maintaining proper male and female roles. When an accident forces the husband and wife to change places, everyone is much happier. This could be a comic premise--Mr. Mom--but Fisher treats it with seriousness and psychological insight.
  • The Unpossessed by Tess Slesinger (1934)
    Slesinger used her disillusion with the whole cultural spectrum of the 1930s for her sparkling satire of the New York leftwing editors of a radical magazine. The novel is both a penetrating autobiographical portrait of the divided woman intellectual of the decade, painfully torn between party politics and personal emancipation; and a timeless and very funny lampoon of ideologues driven by vanity, political trendiness, and competition.
  • The Mountain Lion by Jean Stafford (1947)
    Stafford was at her best in this powerful coming-of-age novel about a young brother and sister, Ralph and Molly Fawcett, who spend their summers at their grandfather’s ranch in Colorado. While Ralph is being initiated into adventurous manhood, Molly is fiercely and tragically resisting the dull femininity which lies in store for her.
  • Maud Martha by Gwendolyn Brooks (1953)
    The only novel by the poet Gwendolyn Brooks, Maud Martha tells the story of a poor black Chicago housewife, in a lyrical form like that of Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, but suffused with anger against racism, war, and the daily small tragedies of black women’s lives. An American classic.
  • We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson (1962)
    Long overlooked, Jackson’s masterpiece has been rediscovered in the twenty-first century by writers from Stephen King and Jonathan Lethem to Joyce Carol Oates. A perfectly constructed and spine-chilling example of the female gothic, the novel was among the first great stories of the weird girl, part teenage outcast, part witch, as a dark heroine of American horror.
  • The Shadow Knows by Diane Johnson (1974)
    While Diane Johnson’s novels about Americans in Paris (such as Le Divorce) have been bestsellers, The Shadow Knows is my favorite among her books. Set in Northern California in the early 1970s, it is about the racial conflict and paranoia of the decade, and, in Johnson’s words, “about persons on the fringe; they happen to be women, and what happens to them is meant to be particular to America in the seventies.”
  • Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson (1980)
    In her first novel, Pulitzer-Prize winning writer Robinson traced the lives of three generations of women in the imaginary Idaho town of Fingerbone, which is surrounded by mountains and next to a dark lake. The narrator, Ruth, and her sister, Lucille, are passed from one family caregiver to another; finally, their aunt Sylvie Fisher, a wanderer and transient, comes back to keep house for them. But Sylvie’s bizarre housekeeping is like something out of a gothic fairy tale, and the sisters find their separate ways to create their own domestic visions.
  • Mona in the Promised Land by Gish Jen (1996)
    Gish Jen is one of the funniest and most free-wheeling novelists of the multicultural 90s. In Mona in the Promised Land, whose title plays off a long tradition of Jewish-American immigrant writing, the adolescent Chinese-American heroine Mona Chang is at a new stage of ethnic identity, renaming and self-creation. In their own enclave, she and her high school friends exchange food, music, games, and politics. In the promised land, American girls can change their names, their religions, even re-invent their nationalities.
  • From Publishers Weekly

    Starred Review. By covering the lives and careers of hundreds of American women writers of all backgrounds, this survey is ambitious and galvanizing, contributing to feminist theory without itself reading like theory. Diverse beyond easy description, these women, especially in earlier centuries, have two things in common. One is an almost universal break with patriarchal constructs. Second is gaining independence from European literary models, female as well as male. Although there have been multivolume, encyclopedic works of greater scope, like Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar's Norton Anthology of Literature by Woman, this is the first guide and history ever attempted by one scholar working solo. With a generally chronological approach (including a handful of sensible deviations), Showalter's Baedeker showcases the rise and fall of styles and genres. Lives and careers of superstars such as Emily Dickinson, Gertrude Stein, Pearl S. Buck and Toni Morrison are put into high relief. In Showalter's book, the voices of several hundred other authors, ranging from Phillis Wheatley and Julia Ward Howe to Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton, Grace Metalious and James Tiptree Jr., sing out in a monumental choral orchestrated by Showalter (A Literature of Their Own), a groundbreaking feminist scholar at Princeton. (Feb. 25)
    Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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    Customer Reviews

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    Excellent and essential!
    C. M Mills
    The theme of Susan Glaspell's short story raises the moral question of how a patriarchal world can fairly judge a woman's value.
    G. Donahue
    The author does a really good job of including a variety of women authors from Sojourner Truth to Amy Tan.
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    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    13 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Tom Whalen on May 17, 2009
    Format: Hardcover
    Elaine Showalter's list of writers discussed in her book is long and diverse and welcome, but the omissions are even more surprising than I had imagined, and I don't mean the absence of Canadian and Central and South American writers from her "American Women Writers."

    I'm not an expert in the field, but here are sixteen 20th century U.S. women novelists and novels I regret Professor Showalter did not discuss:

    Evelyn Scott - The Narrow House (1921)
    Frances Newman - The Hard-Boiled Virgin (1926)
    Caroline Gordon - Aleck Maury, Sportsman (1930)
    Eleanor Green - The Hill (1936)
    Mildred Walker - Winter Wheat (1944)
    Dorothy B. Hughes - In a Lonely Place (1947)
    Theodora Keogh - The Tattooed Heart (1953)
    Helen Eustis - The Fool Killer (1954)
    Margaret Millar - Beast in View (1955)
    Evelyn Piper - Bunny Lake Is Missing (1957)
    Mary Lee Settle - Know Nothing (1960)
    Dawn Powell - The Golden Spur (1962)
    Paula Fox - Desperate Characters (1970)
    Hannah Green - The Dead of the House (1970)
    Gayl Jones - Eva's Man (1976)
    Eleanor Clark - Gloria Mundi (1979)

    Am I to conclude that instead of these writers I should have been reading Grace Metalious, Pearl S. Buck, Ayn Rand, and Terry McMillan, all of whom Showalter does include? (In fact I have read but won't be rereading them.)

    I'm glad to see that in Chapter 18: The 1970s she includes SF writers Ursula K. LeGuin, Joanna Russ, James Tiptree, Jr., Chelsea Quinn Yarboro, and Vonda N. McIntyre. But before these writers there were Leigh Brackett, Andre Norton and C. L. Moore. Nor can one find among her featured SF writers Suzy McKee Charnas, Suzette Haden Elgin, Kit Reed, Pamela Zoline, or Bev Jafek, to name only a few.
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    3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By G. Donahue on May 30, 2010
    Format: Paperback
    What: Jury of Her Peers-American Women Writers from Anne Bradstreet to Annie Proulx, by Elaine Showalter, 2009

    This literary history, organized chronologically over 350 years of American women's literature, makes distinctions, selections, and judgments over this often overlooked segment of American history. The title is based on the 1917 short story by Susan Glaspell called, "A Jury of Her Peers". The theme of Susan Glaspell's short story raises the moral question of how a patriarchal world can fairly judge a woman's value. In the case of "A Jury of Her Peers", a woman's guilt is in question; but Elaine Showalter then extrapolates the theme to that of the futility of women writers being judged as writers by a patriarchal world of publishers and editors.

    This 500-page, very-readable history is for those who love literature--especially American literature--and even more precisely, little-known women's literature. It unfolds and reveals a rich panorama of our history. How did the author approach such a voluminous task, and what distinguishes women's literature from literature written by men? Elaine Showalter clarifies that she is not basing her distinctions or judgments on biology or any sexual differences; but, rather, on societal pressures on women over these 350 years as opposed to the pressures and roles of men. From such a broad and sometimes obscure history, the author focuses her search for women who wrote for publication as opposed to women who wrote diaries, letters, recipes, etc. She also focuses on traditional literary genres--poems, plays, and fiction as well as popular fiction, girls' books, hit plays, and satiric verses.
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    Format: Hardcover
    Elaine Showalter an English Literature emirita professor at Princeton University has produced a magisterial book on the history of American women authors from the colonial to the modern age. This is the first book of its kind ever written which assures Showalter a place in American Literary Criticism's Hall of Fame!
    This book is not only the first of its kind but is an excellent introduction to the vast scope of American women writing in the genres of fiction and poetry. Among the luminaries whose works are reviewed with fair and critical acumen by Showalter are:
    Anne Bradstreet: Margaret Fuller; Harriet Beecher Stowe; Edith Wharton; Willa Cather; Gertrude Stein; Elinor Wylie; Dorothy Parker; Anne Sexton;
    Sylvia Plath; Anne Tyler; Grace Metalious; Gwendolyn Brooks; Toni Morrison (who along with Pearl Buck is only one of two American women to be the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature): Alice Walker, Joan Didion; Elizabeth Bishop; Marianne Moore; Joan Didion and countless others.
    Many of these writers have been lost to the historical canon. Susan Glaspell was one of these. Her play "A Jury of Her Peers" lends itself to the title of this sine qua non work of scholarship by Showalter.
    One is in awe of the monumental achievement accomplished by Showalter! How could one woman read, digest and research all of these books and individuals is amazing.
    This book will become a classic; should be used in all collegiate courses on American Literature and should be in the library of all persons who have an interest in feminism, good writing and the American literary tradition. Excellent and essential!
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