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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on April 20, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I skimmed through the entire book in 20 minutes. I was excited to read this book because I like learning from the experiences of others and I like hearing people stories. Unfortunately, this book offered very short stories that do not go in depth into each person's life. Before each interview the author includes a personal reflection on the interview which were mundane. The interviews were brief, but many people were interviewed. As a result, you get a compilation of numerous, cursory, 2-3 page interviews which read more like a college report than something one might read for personal interest. I was very disappointed by this book because I had read many interesting autobiographies and biographies in the past which I have greatly enjoyed. If you are interested in good biographies, this might not be the book for you. It felt like I was reading magazine articles where a celebrity writes in a brief story, minus the interesting factor of magazines. This book was a yawn and not good literature. On the plus side, many celebrities including Serena Williams, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and Maria Shriver were interviewed, but the interviews lacked depth. You get what you put into a book, and it was clear that the author did not have abundant life experiences which would make stories interesting to tell. More like a college paper than an actual book.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on June 14, 2014
Format: Hardcover
As a millennial who just graduated college and found herself unemployed and living back with her parents, I thought this would be the perfect book for me. I saw the title and immediately ordered it without reading the synopsis or, more importantly, looking at the author’s name. So when I read in the introduction that the author’s mother had delivered the commencement at USC I was extremely confused, until I looked back at the author’s name. Katherine Schwarznegger.

As in “daughter of Arnold”.

This in and of itself hurt the book in my opinion. It’s hard to take career advice from someone who literally doesn’t need to have a career. As you would expect, money is basically never mentioned in this book. It’s very centered around the idea of finding a calling and a purpose, and Schwarznegger does a decent job at covering the topic. And yet all of the “follow your dreams, do what you love!" advice is great when money is no issue, but unfortunately to about 99% of college grads right now it is a very serious issue. What little advice in regards to money that is offered is laughable at best, insulting at worst. The stories and pieces of advice included in the book are well-written and mildly inspiring but have very little practical application.

And so this book ends up being aimed toward a niche audience. For instance, jewelry designer Jennifer Meyer talks about how the worst thing to happen to her was having her father say he was “cutting her off” - although she could live with him as long a she wanted without having to pay for rent or groceries. No money for movies or the mall. Because of stories like this I walked away from this book with a sour taste in my mouth feeling more sorry for myself than before.

This book really should be titled “I Come From a Wealthy Family and I Just Graduated…Now What?”

*I received this book for free from the publisher’s Blogging for Books program in exchange for this review.*
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26 of 31 people found the following review helpful
on April 7, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Definitely really questioning how relatable Katherine's story really is here. Really cool idea and I'm sure plenty of celebrity testimonials, but if you guys want to read a more authentic post-grad book take a look at, Ari King's piece. King actually wrote the exact same type of book and self-published it a couple of years ago:

http://www.amazon.com/What-Conversations-about-College-Graduation/dp/0988753006

Shame that Katherine took the idea and title verbatim...
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on July 4, 2014
Format: Hardcover
As a member of Blogging for Books and the wife of a recent college graduate, I thought I was doing a good thing when I requested a copy of I Just Graduated... Now What? by Katherine Schwarzenegger. I was wrong.

It is a nice enough looking volume in hardcover (if I must deal with hardcover books, I always prefer that they come in a more diminutive mass market size, and this book didn't disappoint there), so I had no idea what I had gotten myself into until I sat down and started reading.

First of all, maybe I'm slow, but it certainly didn't gel for me that Katherine Schwarzenegger is the daughter of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Maria Shriver until I was perusing the table of contents to see whose advice was included and I noticed both Arnold and Maria Shriver listed... and then the author's last name dawned on me. Right about the time I was twigging to the fact that the author of this book wasn't exactly your typical hard-working young undergraduate who worked her way through college and was seeking (and sharing) advice for how to take that scary next step in the real word, but, in fact, the silver spoon-fed daughter of two celebrities who clearly wanted to answer that question for herself by using her celebrity connections to assign homework to famous people she knows and trick them as a collective into writing a book she can slap her name and picture on to buy herself a little post-grad time before she has to prove herself on whatever her own merits might be. (I'm still fuzzy on what those are.) Just as this realization became fully developed for me, and I attempted to maintain an open mind, thinking that possibly this young daughter of two celebrities had something noteworthy to say, I read in the introduction (one of the few parts she actually bothered to write herself) an anecdote about the speech her mom gave at her recent college graduation ceremony.

*Cue eye roll.*

No disrespect to Maria Shriver, but... really? The author was losing credibility points right and left with this particular reader. She didn't sound like an adult parsing out sage advice she had collected, but like a kid parroting back what she'd heard. Then again, maybe that doesn't really matter, because, of the 278 pages within "her" book, she only bothered to write about 62 of them, most of those being short introductions to each "interview" with a fellow celebrity. And, I put quotation marks around interview because it seems like the author didn't ask questions, just a single question, which is the title of the book. The "interviews" read as if Katherine Schwarzenegger had her famous parents call or email their friends and ask if they could write a few pages on this topic and then give it to their daughter to use in her book.

Another problem I have with this book is that the subtitle is a blatant lie: "Honest answers from those who have been there." In this context, "been there" should mean that they graduated from college, right? Apparently that isn't what it means to Katherine Schwarzenegger, who says of her interviewees in the introduction, "Some have only an undergraduate degree, while some have a master's degree in business or other areas. Others never went to college, or did go but for whatever reason did not graduate." Um, what?That is like compiling a book of opinions from doctors and labeling it as such, but then also including what a Red Cross weekend volunteer has to say. I find it absurd that Random House let her get away with such obvious disregard for her readers.

The thing that really burns me about this book is that I couldn't stop comparing it to a book I read back in May... and loved... and recommended to several people: Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek by Maya Van Wagenen, a 15-year-old girl who found a guide to popularity for teen girls written in the '50's and decided to follow the advice included within. She documented her year-long experiment with mature and insightful writing, and really made herself vulnerable within her book's 272 pages, all of which she actually wrote herself. Van Wagenen has exactly zero celebrity parents or connections to famous people. She represented a typical teenage girl using her own resources, abilities, and creativity to write and sell her book. The advice she collected from interviewing her peers at school (a very brave thing to do), asking her parents and other family friends and relatives, and eventually speaking with the author of the vintage popularity guide directly was hard-won and could easily be implemented in the lives of her readers. Perhaps Katherine Schwarzenegger should've asked Maya Van Wagenen for some post-grad advice. I mean, Van Wagenen hasn't graduated from college (yet: I have no doubts), but, then again, neither have some of the other "experts" Schwarzenegger selected to dole out post-grad wisdom for her book. I doubt it mattered to her, as long as she didn't have to write it herself.
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22 of 29 people found the following review helpful
Format: Hardcover
Is this book a joke? Katherine, you are from the 1% that can afford to "pause." The rest of us get jobs, whether we like them or not, because we have loans to pay back and bills to pay, like car insurance, rent, utilities, etc. And even if we live with our parents after graduation, some peoples' parents can't afford for them not to pitch in. We work our way into the jobs we love - hopefully. Without your connections, you would not have gotten this book published, which is as clueless as "Lean In."
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on July 30, 2014
Format: Hardcover
This is a book I can't really take seriously. I know this may seem a bit judgmental on my part, but I have a valid reason. Ms. Schwarzenegger has it all. She was raised in a very wealthy household whose caring parents are major highlights in the media. I read the first few pages of her "easy-to-get-published-book-because-my parents-are-famous" book and it details her insecurities of the future and not knowing what to do after graduating college. I wanted to scream "bulls***" in the middle of the bookstore. Okay, not really, but I found myself in a permanently smirked expression on my face.

I can only take advice from people who had it hit them hard. Yes, maybe, JUST MAYBE, her (or her ghostwriter's) words of reassurance are enough to shine light on the future of a college graduate such as myself, but I just can't bare to read this. I know that if life hits her hard, she has a vey thick security blanket to fall on.

Unlike most college graduates, we work, pay our own bills, struggle to find a career, and then begrudgingly anticipate student loan bills to come in the mail within the next few months. It's pure torture, but I am learning with every struggle I encounter. This book should be in the category of "Superficial Problems of Rich Kids Who Don't Know What Real Problems Are". You can't deny that.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on June 5, 2014
Format: Hardcover
This book was....okay. I feel like I resonated with Schwarzeneggers confusion and frustration, but it ends there. The entire time reading I was thinking 'wow that sounds convenient'. I was a tad confused at the vague nature of the testimonials...did John legend just run into Kanye on the street? And Jennifer Meyer got a job editing a popular magazine at 21 with absolutely no writing or editing experience? I'm a recent grad...and I'm feeling less alone after reading this book, but not hopeful.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I don't know about you, but my college experience was not the same as that of the daughter of a celebrity. Last year, Ari King self-published a very similar book, but spoke to college graduates in the 99% - those of us that have struggled to find ourselves and jobs in the middle of an economic crisis, while also dealing with student loans. Check it out if you feel that Schwarzenegger's doesn't quite resonate with your own - http://www.amazon.com/What-Conversations-about-College-Graduation/dp/0988753006/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1397227565&sr=1-1&keywords=ari+king+now+what%3F+book
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 11, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I give this book 3 stars because not everybody has the connections and opportunity that Katherine Schwarzenegger has. Therefore, we often end up in jobs that are not our passion or vocation / calling. I wish I had the Hollywood connections and access to agents that Katherine has because there would be greater opportunities to do something with myself.

I received a signed copy of this book for free by participating in a Twitter sweepstakes that Katherine Schwarzenegger was offering. It was very nice to have received a signed copy from Katherine's publisher for free. Unfortunately, I don't think I gathered any useful information out of this book as it simply passed the time for me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on June 18, 2014
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I had higher expectations for this book, since I have a son who just graduated college. This was disappointing in that it was a collection of short bios about famous peoples' early struggles, people obviously the author could get to interview because of her famous mother and father.
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