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Media Tried Justice Denied, Behind the truth and Lies of the Darlie Lynn Routier Murder Case Paperback – March 6, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0966945300 ISBN-10: 0966945301

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 532 pages
  • Publisher: Ad Vice Marketing Inc (March 6, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0966945301
  • ISBN-13: 978-0966945300
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.2 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,497,836 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Christopher Wayne Brown is the publisher of a local magazine in Dallas, Texas, called "Around Our Town." The magazine did a story on Death Row written by John McLemore (Brian Pardo's right-hand man) in the July 1998 issue. Christopher didn't really follow the Routier Case when it happened. However, he did see the newscast of the "Silly String" at the grave site. Then he was riding around in his car a week or so later and heard on the radio that Darlie Routier had been arrested for the murder of her two sons.

Harry Lux

Many people ask me how I got involved in the matter of Darlie Routier. I normally tell them - lucky I guess and go on my way. I, like many of you, sat and watched the evening news as Darlie Routier sprayed "Silly String" on the grave of her two young boys just eight days after the stabbing attack of her and her children. So when they arrested her, I knew she was guilty! Hey! I saw her spray the "Silly String." She must be guilty. During that time period I had a very busy schedule. Not a lot of time to dedicate to up-to-date news, just little bits here and there. I knew kids were murdered. I saw the tape. Then, I heard she was arrested on the radio, boom! It made perfect sense. The connection of the tape and the arrest closed the case for me. She was guilty. If Susan Smith could do it, so could anybody else. Especially in Texas, it was bound to happen. End of story. Well, not quite. In September of 1996, I started a local magazine in north Dallas called "Around Our Town." The magazine articles focused on local issues that were mainly positive. Nothing really negative. There was enough negative stuff in the daily newspaper. So in January 1998, I hired my first employee, D'Lee Garza as chief editor. By now, you may have figured out already, this isn't a very large publication. What does chief editor mean? Well, it meant she was in charge of the stories that people faxed to us and she'd get to type them into the layout. However, she treated that role as if we were a national publication. For the July 1998 issue, she wanted to do a story on death row. Her brother, Brad Garza is a parole officer in Waco, Texas. He works out at the gym with a man by the name of John McLemore. John used to be an investigative TV reporter. He was the reporter that broke the Branch Davidians story on the raid that killed four ATF officers. John helped save several lives in a crossfire between the ATF and the Davidians. John's heroic acts were soon punished with jealous reporters making accusations that led to the end of his television reporting career. Later the accusations were proven false. Yet, news stations still banished him, no matter where he applied. John now works for Life Partners. It just so happens, he is the right-hand man to Brian Pardo, the millionaire who started looking into Darlie's case. Both Brian and John have uncovered several pieces of interesting facts about her case. Well, Brad suggested D'Lee call John and ask if he would write a story about death row. She did, and he did. However, the story he submitted was about forty pages long. My magazine is only 32 pages total, and I have to place advertisements somewhere in the magazine. There were about ten pages on Darlie. Now remember, I saw the tape, just like most of you. Come on, I knew she was guilty, and in no shape, form or fashion was I going to give that convicted child killer any ink or recognition. They don't convict those kind of people for nothing you know. So, we cut down the article, a lot. The issue went out with just a small note stating that Brian Pardo's company, Life Partners was also looking into the Darlie Routier case. John invited D'Lee and I to come down to their office and look at some of the case. I really didn't want to go, and even passed it up. However, D'Lee continued to look into the case, even after the issue of the magazine was out. I wanted to put an end to it all and get back on track of our business. So, I agreed to take a wasted trip down to Waco and blow holes into all their theories. About two days before the trip, at 11:00 o'clock at night, I got on the internet and pulled up everything on Darlie Lynn Routier. There were about 350 articles. I thought the best way to get familiar with the case was to find out what the "tiny detectives" thought. What this means is that reporters are tiny detectives focusing on just one aspect of the case, and they then write whole stories on just that one aspect. I got to hire numerous detectives without paying them a single dime. Although it might be a fast, easy and inexpensive way to find out a lot about a certain topic, you do however, have to read between the lines and not take everything as factual. So one by one I read every article. By 8:00 a.m. I was convinced that Darlie Lynn Routier was innocent. That's right - INNOCENT. As I read the articles, I began taking notes. I made a "cast of characters," of all of the people that were linked to the case. Every time a person's name came up, I wrote it down. I wrote down who they were, what they did, and if they were for the defense or for the prosecution. By the time I arrived in Waco, I wasn't going to blow holes in their theories, I was going to listen and try to get the information that I was lacking. One thing led to another, and before we knew it, there was enough information and new information to write a book. I sincerely believe God works in wonderful ways. Who would have thought, I, the guy that wouldn't give two words in a magazine article would write over 200,000 words in a book. I guess, this is my way for making up for the past, judging a book before it is read. I hope I will never make the same mistake again. This is my promise to Darlie and others like her. I hope this book brings you a sense of understanding that some mothers, accused of killing their children, are innocent.

- Christopher Wayne Brown -

Customer Reviews

I really believed this book would help me decide Darlie's guilt or innocence and it didn't.
Anne "royal watcher"
I'm not convinced that Darlie is the killer, but I'm certainly not convinced she isn't, either (and this book sure didn't answer any of my questions).
M Little
It makes me shiver to think the author actually got this published because of the multitude of grammar and spelling errors.
bbuffy2

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By julie wagner on February 3, 2000
This book actually gave the reader some good food for thought concerning Darlie Routier's innocence. However, it is difficult to get past the blatant and NUMEROUS spelling, grammatical and syntax errors. And while Mr. Brown complains of inconsistencies and/or contradictions made by the Rowlett Police Department, there are many of his own in the book, some only paragraphs apart. Also, even if the Rowlett Police are as inept as Mr. Brown claims (which is hard to believe), his complete lack of respect for them is disturbing. Again, while Mr. Brown raises valid points that are worth considering, the book seems loaded with his own emotions and/or feelings toward Darlie. Another note: the pictures are very disturbing.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 30, 1999
And I use the term 'written' very loosely, as anyone could have pasted this together and commented on it. The whole book is news columns interspersed with the author's comments, mainly sarcastic in tone. This makes for very disjointed reading. It would have been much better if the author had simply printed the news column with his comments at the bottom of the respective pages. Better yet would have been a true book, written by the author and not simple taken from new columns. Also, the author didn't caption the pictures very well. Speaking of the pictures, they should never have been done in color; how disrespectful to those poor children. There was no need to put color pictures in, and especially ones that didn't cover their faces completely. For Darli to agree to this (and her husband too, for that matter)is one more reason I believe she is guilty. Nothing in the book changed my mind on that; maybe because the author didn't back his commentary up with much, if any, facts. This was one of the most annoying, non-informative books to read, and a total waste of money. If you want to read it, wait for it at the library or look for it on auction; don't pay full price. Definitely not worth the $25. Not even worth $.25
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 19, 1999
The book is interesting but the author should have continued searching for facts. My brother knows the Routiers very well and was supposed to be visiting them that horrible week. No matter what you think of the Texas Justice System, you should know how Darlie has changed her story numerous times when talking to my brother.
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 26, 2000
To begin with, this really isn't a book - at least not in the typical fashion. CWB takes newspaper articles from the time period of the murders and trial and attempts to prove Darlie's innocence by showing inaccuracies in the articles. The vast majority of his comments are immaterial to the case or sarcastic in nature...
He gives no expert witnesses to back up his footprint theories... and other biased information is blatantly incorrect. He offers very little in direct quotes from the city attorneys or investigators because he obviously didn't solicit their opinions or thoughts on any of his wild theories or gibberish. He makes no attempt at objectivity, so don't expect any.
Having lived in the area many years ago, I found numerous claims to be outright lies. However, this is an anything goes book - as evidenced by the needlessly explicit photos - and CWB stops at nothing in his attempt to show a massive media and police conspiracy to railroad Darlie.
Even when a valid point was made, I was left wondering if this was more nonsense that would be obvious to me if I was more educated on the case issues as opposed to blindly accepting CWB's comments.
For the price of this book, you could buy all of other 3 books on the subject. Do yourself a favor and click to another book.
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful By julie on February 21, 2000
I believed after reading all the books written about the case that she was guilty. This 'book', (I use the term losely) did nothing to convince me otherwise. I mean lets face it; a mother who has been 'attacked' and has had two of her babies brutally stabbed to death, DO NOT say 8 days later......."Well, we had some good times with them..." This is on top of a complete lack of intruder evidence and let's face it...these cops KNOW....when they first start investigating and interviewing....they KNOW deep down if something is inherently wrong with the situation. Anyone who believes otherwise (including Brown) is a shirt-tailer and probably believes O.J. too! Thanks
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 26, 1999
The state's evidence photos used in this book are valuable for studying this case. That's the only good thing I can say about this book. It's so full of typos, misspelled words, unfinished sentences and sarcasm, I recommend buying it only if you want to look at the pictures and pay for an over-priced book.
Christopher W. Brown is just another one of those "SLOBS" who comes along and takes advantage of a family-in-crisis. At a recent fund-raiser banquet, he spoke of the donations from this book that will go to Ms. Routier's Defense/Appeals Fund. It would be interesting to know how much he has donated -- if anything. He's a "USER" and a "LOSER." Too bad the family got taken in by him.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Julie L. Sterling on July 8, 2003
Albeit there are grammatical errors in this book, and there is a definite 'GottaLoveDarlieLynn' theme throughout, if you are a serious amateur sleuth/true crime buff, the crime scene and autopsy photos are well worth the price of the book. You can wade through the news articles and endure the author's sometimes irritating comments if the desire is present, but the true meat of this publication is without a doubt the photos.
That being said, let me add there should be NO doubt these are horrific photos of the wounds inflicted on these 2 young boys, so take that with you when you see them.
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