Customer Reviews

51
4.6 out of 5 stars
Justin Case: School, Drool, and Other Daily Disasters (Justin Case Series)
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:$6.99 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
on May 28, 2010
JUSTIN CASE is absolutely hilarious but also meaningful. Like Justin, I am a kid who worries, a lot not a little. So some of Justin's thoughts were like - that is SO me! But not all. For instance I am not scared of dogs and Justin is. I was reading and reading, and I kept being like, okay, just one more bit and that's it! But then I kept going. And I am not somebody who does that, normally. But I just could not stop! I loved the characters of his grandparents named Gingy and Poopsie and also his friends/not-friends like the runny-aroundy boys! They added so much humor but also deepness. I loved when Justin had good days but I was always like, uh-oh -- what's coming next? I think this is an excellent book for third graders, of course, but also for fourth and fifth graders, because we have already been through the things Justin is going through so we can be more like, oh, no, Justin! Don't do that! Okay that is all I am writing because now I am going to read some of my favorite parts again! I give this book 5 Superstars -- so, Justin, you are the Superstar Champion!!!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on June 12, 2010
Justin Case is a hilariously funny book similar to that of Diary of a Wimpy Kid distinguished by the friendliness and level of mean humor. Diary of a Wimpy Kid has a large amount of mean humor, while Justin Case doesn't. Therefore, Justin Case is a much better book and is the ideal book for those who tend to worry, those needing a good book to read, and anyone else with the ability to read.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on September 19, 2010
September 14, Tuesday

Do you have a child who worries? I do. He's been worrying since he was two. I worry that his worrying will keep him from having fun, playing with other kids, and trying out for the swim team.

I think it's contagious.

I wish I had Rachel Vail's adorable book (Justin Case: School, Drool and other Daily Disasters), when my now-nearly-twelve worrier was entering third grade, as Justin does. Through a series of hilarious journal entries, we live the life of an eight year old worrier as he fends off rebellious stuffed animals, schemes to get a dog (even though he's terrified of them), and finds a way to survive the year without his best friend in his class. Along the way, he discovers that bravery means not letting your fears get in the way.

Content: gentle, fun book about life in third grade

I love the way this book allows kids to get inside the head of epic-worrier, Justin Case:

September 8, Tuesday
Tomorrow is the first day of third grade.
Mom said to focus on the bright side.
Well, Xavier Schwartz is not in my class this year. That's bright.
No. It's not helping. I'm still focusing on the dark side.

As well as bringing out the real-life triumphs of life as a third grader:

November 7, Saturday
I scored!
Holy cannoli, I scored the winning goal in soccer today!
Dad picked me up and spun me around and around.
He thinks the extra practice somehow made the difference. I will never tell him that I was actually trying to pass the ball to Sam and just aimed it badly so it arced into the goal accidentally.
It is a secret I will keep as long as I live.

My twelve year old gamely read this book, but it really was a bit young for him. The reading level is an impressive 5.2 (for a book about third graders), so I think it is a great find for young advanced readers. With its light-hearted innocence and story of triumph over fears large and small, I heartily recommend Justin Case for worriers (and their parents) ages 8+, or even younger - because worrying has no age limit.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on October 28, 2010
Instead of the bratty, lazy attitude of Greg Heffley (Diary of a Wimpy Kid) or the innumerable boys' books that revolve around fart jokes, this book offers a wry, insightful, smart, and funny portrait of that time in life when young boys start the transition from "little boys" to "big boys."

An excellent book for smart boys...especially for those smart boys who are unusually self-aware.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on May 18, 2010
The text is funny and full of heart, the illustrations are charming and hilarious-- this is the perfect book for kids who liked Wimpy Kid, but who are still in elementary school. Told in a diary format, this chronicle of a boy's year in third grade is full of episodes that kids from grades 3 to 5 (and even some older) will relate to. My 4th grade son tore through this, enjoying the nostalgia of third grade (and probably still relating to it more than he'd admit) and laughing out loud in several places. I'm hoping we can read it aloud together -- fun! A must-have.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on December 11, 2010
Kids review:

This book was one of the funniest books I've ever read. He worries about things I never even thought were possible. I loved the way Justin thought he had a bad teacher and she turned out to be even worse. He has a good sense of humor.

Even my 14 year old sister loved this book. She started to read it and couldn't put it down.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 16, 2010
If Woody Allen or David Sedaris were to have kept a diary when they were in third grade, it undoubtedly would have read like `Justin Case', a sharp, quirky, put-the-book-down-because-you're-laughing-so-hard-you-can't-see-the-words-anymore funny narrative that explodes with personality.

Justin Krzeszewski ("Most people just call me Justin K., because Krzeszewski looks like somebody fell asleep and their head rolled around on the computer keyboard") is a little high-strung. If he were half as good at the sports that his parents foolishly keep signing him up for as he is at fretting he would be a gold medalist. But unfortunately soccer, baseball and basketball fall on the same, long list as dogs, Jell-o, the boiler in his basement, his new teacher, failure, and public speaking: things that he not only dislikes intensely, but that send him into fits of near apoplexy. The book shirks a traditional plot structure for a year's worth of Justin's daily diary entries. Some as short as "Mom says no blood. She ruins everything," others covering long, tortured scenes of internal mayhem. The year is full of events that keep Justin up at night, sweating over the possible outcomes: a school election, holidays at insane and unpleasant relative's houses, a dinosaur science fair, old, close friendships growing distant, new ones forming with people that challenge and rattle Justin's sensibilities.

You might suspect that a book featuring a character who regards practically everything with a high level of apprehension and pessimism would become repetitive after a time. But what keeps Justin Case fresh in page after page of diary entries are the moments where Justin surprises you, and sometimes himself, with his bravery and compassion. Vail makes interesting use of the concept of an unreliable first person narrator by showing us glimmers of how the world perceives Justin, rather than how Justin believes he is perceived. Friends seem to flock to him, though he doesn't recognize it. His school projects are often the hit of the class, though he's consumed with how difficult they were to create. Teachers laud him, but he's far more focused on what he must accomplish next to secure their approval. He worries constantly about the welfare of his little sister, revealing the depth of his love for her. The subtext of Justin's words tell you so much more about him than Justin can himself, and with this little trick, Vail creates a wonderfully textured and nuanced character who is as loveable for his neurosis as he is for strengths.

For more reviews from The Rusty Key, visit us at [...]
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on August 29, 2011
I read the first few pages while waiting to pick up my fourth-grade son from school, and much to my surprise, I couldn't put it down. I actually hogged it all to myself (cracking up through the whole thing) while my poor son waited not-so-patiently for me to finish. (Mean Mom!)

There is just so much heart mixed up in the humor, I truly didn't want it to end. End it did, though, so I finally passed it along to my long-suffering son -- who just now walked in and said, "go ahead and give me a bookmark, mom, I finished the first page and I can tell I'm going to love it."

And really, how could he not? Justin Case is a loyal friend, a sweet brother, a loving son, a good student, AND he somehow manages to be fantastically funny and sympathetic at the same time. Amazing.

Thank you Rachel Vail, and please write more!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on February 4, 2012
My 7 year old son only likes to read 'funny' books - he read all of the Junie B. Jones books last year and I was looking for something else that would hold his interest the way those did, but at a little higher level. I found it hard to find something funny that wasn't either too young in format or too mature in content for him - or, for that matter, disrespectful of school and adults, but then I stumbled across this book. Justin is a sweet kid who is just trying to navigate 3rd grade and keep his anxieties in check. His struggles and worries are some that I think a lot of kids go through, and to have them presented (and resolved) in such a humorous and empathetic way is wonderful. I just wish this was a series, because now both my son and I want to see what happens to Justin next!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on May 27, 2010
Justin Case is a book that will appeal to kids of all ages. Kids older than 3rd grade will be able to imagine what they would have done. It's a spectacular book, and it allows you to laugh at his worries and problems and see their real inconsequence (except for climbing the rope in gym). His occasional lists (Things I Like, Things I Don't Like) are imaginative and funny. I highly recommend this book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed


My Life as a Stuntboy (The My Life series)
My Life as a Stuntboy (The My Life series) by Janet Tashjian (Paperback - April 7, 2015)
$6.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.