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KJ3 Literal Translation New Testament Paperback – Large Print, December 3, 2006


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Paperback, Large Print, December 3, 2006
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Sovereign Grace Publishers, Inc. (December 3, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1589604725
  • ISBN-13: 978-1589604728
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 6.1 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #861,581 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jay P. Green, Sr. (1918-) is Translator and Editor of The Interlinear Hebrew-Greek-English Bible and the translator of the Modern King James Version of the Holy Bible, The Teenage Version of the Holy Bible, and the Literal translation of the Holy Bible. He has written numerous books on textual criticism.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Everett Hall on January 20, 2007
Wonderful. This translation will increase your knowledge of the New Testament significantly. It will be helpful in private study to analyze hidden meanings behind key passages, and for witness encounters with people who scoff at holy scripture.

This version is based on several late, less reliable Byzantine manuscripts of the Middle Age church. Even with these texts, however, Jay Green does a commendable job in giving us literal readings even on passages that seem to contradict established Christian theology. It uses modern English, so don't be repulsed by the "KJ3" title, but be forewarned that the grammar is distinctively Greek, and the word order makes it troublesome for native English speakers to read! Large, clear type. There are also many helpful scripture references included by Jay when the Apostle Paul or others quote the Old Testament.

Here is an example of his fine work: "Watch, then, for you do not know in what hour your Lord comes. "But know this, that if the housemaster had known in what watch the thief comes, he would have watched and not have allowed his house to be dug through. Because of this, you also be ready, for in that hour you think not, the Son of Man comes." (Matthew 24:42,43)
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Brown on August 12, 2011
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This could very well be the most accurate English Bible available today.
Obviously, the diligence this translator used demonstrates that he truly believed that "every word of God is pure." (Proverbs 30:5)
Jay P. Green takes great care to render tenses correctly...and nouns are translated as nouns, pronouns as pronouns, verbs as verbs, adjectives as adjectives...etc.
This makes the KJ3 ideal for word studies.

You should be forewarned, though, that this translation contains many grammatically awkward, howbeit literal, phrases like "believing into" (John 3:16), "Not at all I is it?" (Matthew 26:25)...etc.
For this reason, the KJ3 wouldn't my preference for evangelism, memorization, or congregational reading.

However, for in-depth study the KJ3 is worth its weight in gold!
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By P. O'Connor on November 23, 2009
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The KJ3 is a very readable NT version that is accurate and it's good... but not perfect. One of the best translated verses would have to be John 3:8 The old KJV (along with many other English versions) translate one Greek word two ways within the same verse.

KJV 3:8 "The wind <4151> bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, and whither it goeth: so is every one that is born of the Spirit <4151>". Which is it, wind or spirit? That word appears some 385 times in the NT and only once is it translated as 'wind'. It cannot be 'wind' as the wind has no will of it's own (globally it follows the paths set by God, and locally, the path of least resistance). The Greeks use a different word for wind as in Ch 6:18, and this word <4151> is never used in Scripture to denote a depersonalised force.

KJ3 3:8 8 "The Spirit breathes where He desires, and you hear His voice, but you do not know from where He comes, and where He goes; so is everyone having been generated from the Spirit." Much better consistency here, even the word translated as 'voice' here is more accurate.

Just while we're in John 3, another word worth looking at is the word often translated as 'born' comes from the Grk 'Genao' which can be translated either as 'born' or 'generated' and this is determined by the gender of the subject. A mother births and a father generates. In this case (verses 3 & 5) the one initiating the 'Genao' is God and He is male. Nicodemus in vs 4 was talking about a mother so the word 'born' or 'birth' is correct here, but Jesus was speaking of the Heavenly Father.

Some of the bizarre flaws in this version must include the persistent use of the term 'believing INTO' as is used throughout Johns Gospel (3:15, 16, 18, 36, etc). Try working that into an everyday conversation and see if it works.

Overall it is well worth it, and hope enjoy your copy as much as I enjoy mine.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kindle Customer on December 29, 2009
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I really like this newest literal translation of the New Testament. It is a word for word translation with minimal word additions for clarity. The source material is what was used for the original King James Version rather than the text used for some of the newer translations like ESV, NRSV, NASB, etc.

Since all the greek words are in the text, the sentences don't flow as easily as a novel, but I like the translation very much. The translator's vision was to keep the text literal and by doing that, keeping the original meanings. For example, Luke 2:33 which says in the NIV "The child's father and mother marveled at what was said about him." would be different in the KJV3, listing it as "Joseph" instead of "the child's father". Jay P Green, the translator felt this was a direct attack on the divinity of Jesus, here, and in several other places. I like that each word in the original text is included in this translation.
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30 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Bob Guske on December 22, 2007
KJ3 Literal Translation New Testament

NOTE: Because of its length and possibly controversial content, I don't expect you to post this review. Nevertheless, it does reflect my present take on J. Green's translation.

Initial Reading, First Impressions

According to its translator, readers can approach this volume with complete confidence in its accuracy:
"Now, at last, all can read in English the very words that God wrote in Hebrew and Greek. For in this KJ3 Bible the reader has every word that God breathed out and had written for our instruction.. [sic] Nothing has been added, and no word has been taken away. There are no substitute words (such as synonyms), no paraphrases, no ignoring of the frequent double negatives in the Scriptures, and no interpretations (for God is His own interpreter, we can know His meanings only by His very words, and no other way)." (p. xii)

Any attempt, of course, to evaluate these sweeping statements within the context of a brief online review of the translation would clearly involve a herculean, if not an impossible feat. A sampling of two or three verses should suffice to highlight the problem.

1.) In the KJV, for example, John 10:16 reads as follows: "And other sheep I have, which are not of this fold [aules]: them also I must bring, and they shall hear my voice; and there shall be one fold [poimne], and one shepherd." Note that the KJV translators used the same English word, fold, to translate two different Greek nouns. Greek lexicons define aule as "an open, uncovered space enclosed by a wall, a yard for cattle, a sheepfold, a courtyard," etc., and poimne as "a flock of sheep or goats, a herd, fig.
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