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Kajira of Gor (Gorean Saga) Paperback – June 30, 2007


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Product Details

  • Series: Gorean Saga
  • Paperback: 536 pages
  • Publisher: e-reads.com; 40 edition (June 30, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0759219265
  • ISBN-13: 978-0759219267
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.1 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,264,808 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John Norman, born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1931, is the creator of the Gorean Saga, the longest-running series of adventure novels in science fiction history. Starting in December 1966 with Tarnsman of Gor, the series was put on hold after its twenty-fifth installment, Magicians of Gor, in 1988, when DAW refused to publish its successor, Witness of Gor. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a trade publishing outlet, the series was brought back into print in 2001. Norman has also produced a separate science fiction series, the Telnarian Histories, plus two other fiction works (Ghost Dance and Time Slave), a nonfiction paperback (Imaginative Sex), and a collection of thirty short stories, entitled Norman InvasionsThe Totems of Abydos was published in spring 2012. 

All of Norman’s work is available both in print and as ebooks. The Internet has proven to be a fertile ground for the imagination of Norman’s ever-growing fan base, and at Gor Chronicles (www.gorchronicles.com), a website specially created for his tremendous fan following, one may read everything there is to know about this unique fictional culture. 

Norman is married and has three children.

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Greg Smith on October 17, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read this series when it first came out, and I'm enjoying it again now.

Everybody knows the basics---but I don't always see this series of books reviewed in a way that I would consider to be accurate, or even appropriate.

John Norman is constantly berated as a misogynist gender-bashing sexist---and, if the trappings and settings of the books are to be taken in a very superficial way, then I suppose there is some merit to these claims. But I can attest to a much greater depth in these works than often meets the eye (or the psychology) of the average page-eater.

Very often, and in many ways, Mr. Norman illustrates that it is the women in this series of novels who are the deepest characters---the strongest---the most noble---the most complex---and, assuredly, the most interesting. Without giving away any of the plot elements of this book, if there is a theme that is being explored here, it is the same theme that is almost universally manifested in these stories---that the female of the species, whether they be of Earth or of Gor, is exceedingly superior to the male.

The guys in these books are grudgingly typical---boorish, power-hungry, easily led, and always adhering to a shallow "gimme gimme" philosophy that drags them through the plot as if they were the ones in chains---and not the women they so fatuously profess to "own."

But this is only a starting point for the gender-specific character development that Norman grants us. It goes much deeper than it looks on the surface.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Smithee on July 14, 2013
Format: Paperback
Possibly the best of the "earth-girl-abducted-and-made-a-slave" books. While the main character does indeed become a slave girl, the book is woven with political intrigue centered around the Cos vs. Ar struggle. The former's main ally is ruled by a woman (irony!) opposed to the Priest-Kings, and intending to become a power player. However, the proposition is risky, and much could be lost. So why not hire a dupe, a pretender, to "take the fall" in case plans go astray? This is where Tiffany Collins--a scheming, manipulative young woman of Earth--comes in.

Brought to Gor much like a slave girl, she is surprised (and at least once feels disappointed) that she is not so. She plays the role exactly as her abductors would have her, with one significant exception: she starts to feel disturbing feelings, brought on by the stark contrast between men and women on Gor. She recognizes the male's natural strength and power, and even is smitten by the guard assigned to her. When her serving-girl slave is commented upon favorably by this guard, she even tells him her body is better than the slave's! She even allows herself to be taken to a tavern where slave girls serve, becoming incredibly and helplessly aroused in the process. This arouses suspicion which eventually saves her life.

Indeed, her city's plans are unsuccessful, and the power players flee and leave poor little Tiffany to be captured, stripped, and put in a cage to be executed. But she is rescued and flees, naked. Captured, she is put up for display, only to be recognized by a hated, ugly man, who promises to keep her safe only if she pretends to be his slave.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By G. Remrow on November 27, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having read "Imaginative Sex" from the same author before, I understand the Gorean Saga as wonderful collection of truly romantic stories. Every bit of them holds some small truth, wrapped in myths and science fiction stories, vividly and carefully drawn characters and rich phantasies.
"Kajira of Gor" is certainly one of the finest stories of the Gorean Saga, maybe only surpassed by "Slave girl of Gor" but equally thrilling and entertaining.
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By John Logan on April 9, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Gor saga continues through the trials and tribulations of miss Tiffany Collins follow along on her voyage of acquisition
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By ewn on August 29, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book was a pleasant surprise. Very refreshing and well told story, which is really interesting for those affiliated to gorean lifestyle.
It can be recommended to those having read more of the books in this series.
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