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The "Kansas City" Sessions

January 28, 1997 | Format: MP3

$11.49
Also available in CD Format
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:02
30
2
3:00
30
3
3:03
30
4
3:01
30
5
2:59
30
6
3:01
30
7
2:56
30
8
2:57
30
9
2:59
30
10
2:57
30
11
3:22
30
12
2:54
30
13
3:19
30
14
3:17
30
15
3:18
30
16
3:18
30
17
2:53
30
18
2:53
30
19
3:07
30
20
2:53
30
21
3:06
30
22
2:47
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 28, 1997
  • Release Date: January 28, 1997
  • Label: GRP Records
  • Copyright: (C) 1997 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:07:02
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000VGCOSE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #170,251 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Who could ask for better than good recordings from mature, consummate professionals at (or near) the height of their powers? Young, Clayton, et al. had been around more than one block more than a few times by 1938, when the earlier session was recorded, and a few more by 1944, when the later session was recorded. All are exceptional here, especially Clayton's trumpet work and Eddie Durham's electric guitar work. Some say Lester lost his fire after his unpleasant army experience. His earlier stuff is undoubtedly livelier, even the slow blues, but the later recordings, which seem so port-wine-and-reefer slurred, will simply break your heart. All of the recordings here are ample evidence that Young always played what he felt, and that no matter how it came out, there was greatness in it. High points are "Countless Blues," "Pagin' the Devil #2," "Three Little Words," and "Good Mornin' Blues."
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Format: Audio CD
These are superb recordings by the master musician Lester Young and his Kansas City friends. When Young plays the blues on clarinet he reminds me so much of Billy Holliday - the transition from each note to the next is so full of musical emotion that it gets right inside my soul. The 1938 recordings with the clarinet are a high point in all Jazz - along with the Hot Fives and Sevens, Johnny Hodges small groups from 1939-40 etc. Young's beautiful sensitivity is displayed, along with the members of the group who afford Young the best support one could ask for. The 1944 sessions with Young on Tenor are great and complement the earlier sessions perfectly. I would heartily recommend this CD to any human being.
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Format: Audio CD
This is a historic session, I am talking about the 1938 set. One thing here is that this about the first, if not the first Jazz recording, and among the first ever recordings to feature an electric 6 string standard guitar, or an electric guitar as we say in English (all that other stuff is just for certain record keepers i dialog with who claim wanna county amplified Hawaiian guitars). This is loose and mellow, a jam session of the finest kind, made for a record shop label that back in that day was only going to be discovered by the hippest of the hip, musicians and their true lovers.
Lester is superb and more understated and relaxed than on Basie tracks from the same period. The clarinet playing is a gem. Lester complained that Basie tried to minimize clarinet playing by himself and Herschel Evans, the band's soloists on the sax, although they trade clarinet solos on some of the Decca Sides, Jumpin' at the Woodside and Texas Shuffle, I think.
Lester played clarinet wonderfully all the way to his clarinet blues on his last Verve session when he was too weak to lift the tenor.
Getting back to this CD, what is also outstanding here is the rhythm. We have the Basie's All-American rhythm session without Basie for contractual reasons--Freddie Green, Joe Jones, and the great Walter Page. They are augmented here and there by Eddie Durham's electric guitar that comes back into rhythm mode when he is not soloing. (Eddie had been playing solos on a National steel guitar in the Moten, Lunceford, and Basie bands until he went electric. He passed the idea of playing electric lead guitar on to a young former drummer he had known in Oklahoma and convinced to switch to guitar. The man's name was Charlie Christian!
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Format: Audio CD
historically important, but not necessarily my favorite; Lester Young recorded much greater music, both with Basie and on his own, later..Buck Clayton is in good form; Jo Jones sounds great, it's good to be reminded how great Walter Page could be; the two takes of

"Pagin' the Devil" are extraordinary. And Freddie Green, of all people, sings, and very nicely. but Eddie Durham's trombone playing is annoying, frankly; though, again, it's extraordinary to hear Durham's electric guitar work, before Charlie Christian got rolling.
1 Comment 10 of 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
I've had this CD over a month now. The fun part is, I still can't decide which take of "Way Down Yonder in New Orleans" I like better. I hope I never do figure it out. Each version has something the other doesn't. Buck Clayton and Lester Young are amazing throughout - but the high point for me is take #2 of "Them There Eyes" - a joyous, exuberant, finger snapping gem that swings you into places you've never been. Buck and Lester's improvisational talents are primal, heady and exciting. Great early electric guitar by Eddie Durham and rare vocal by pure voiced Freddie Green make this small group session sizzle-with thrilling solo's from all.
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Format: Audio CD
To the reviewer below who thought Durham's guitar "work" (as he put it) was out of place, I say step back and listen carefully. Durham was working in a new medium, and carefully chose his notes. In fact, I would say that his playing is some of the best of that era: tasteful, emotional, and completely aware of the importance of every individual note. Hmmm, kind of sounds like Young himself, huh?

Anyway, this is a great record, not just for the historical significance, but just because it is a great swinging record. I can't get enough of it.

p.s. BTW, Mr. Thomas, Wanna County was a double bass player. Bob Dunn, the lap steel guitar player, was the first to record an amplified instrument. The first to amplify an instrument, as far as I can determine, was Durham.
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