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Kant's Analytic Paperback – January 1, 1966

ISBN-13: 978-0521093897 ISBN-10: 0521093899

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 268 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (January 1, 1966)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521093899
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521093897
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #374,885 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A critical exposition and evaluation of the ideas contained in the first half of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. -- Book Description

Book Description

A critical exposition and evaluation of the ideas contained in the first half of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason.

Customer Reviews

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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Henry on January 19, 2008
Format: Paperback
Of the two reviews on this page which precede this one, one awards one star, the other five. I would like to propose a test which will help you decide to which of those two to give more credence.

The first sentence in the Kemp Smith translation of the Critique of Pure Reason reads: "In whatever manner and by whatever means a mode of knowledge may relate to objects, intuition is that through which it is in immediate relation to them, and to which all thought as a means is directed."

If that sentence fills you with a thrill of anticipation, then you should take the one star review very seriously and approach Bennett's book with a lot of scepticism.

If, on the other hand, the sentence makes you immediately suspicious that that you are going to be subjected to a lot of very misty thinking from which useful insights can only be drawn after much hard work and making grudging allowance for bad writing and imprecise thought....well, then you should pay attention to the five star review and, more particularly, to the second of the Editorial Reviews listed above.

Bennett does a wonderful job of subjecting Kant's work to critical review, teasing out the possible meanings which might be attributed to his often very vague prose, and then making clear which of those possible meanings should be taken seriously and which should be discarded as mistaken or meaningless.

I would like to add my enthusiastic agreement to the editorial review's summary: "This is splendid, and a necessary corrective to that extraordinary isolation in which Kant tends to be islanded, partly indeed, by his own unique qualities, but partly by oceans of the wrong kind of respect. Bennett, continuously engaging his great antagonist, shows the right kind."
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By meadowreader on December 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
Comments between reviewers are generally an undesirable distraction, but the review below by "malenor" is so egregiously unethical that it demands comment. The problem is that the reviewer, as he admits, HAS NOT READ THE BOOK he is reviewing! Any such "review" deserves only to be utterly disregarded or, better yet, removed from the Amazon website. What malenor did was to read the few pages available on Amazon, then arrogantly to proceed to write his "review." The result, predictably, is farcical.

Malenor's insulting contention that Bennett, a Kant scholar of the first rank, does not understand Kant's analytic-synthetic distinction is preposterous on its face. The problem, of course, is that malenor does not comprehend what is at issue in Bennett's treatment of it. Bennett questions Kant's claim that `7 + 5 = 12' is a synthetic proposition because that claim does not allow for chains of inference within a deductive system, but instead relies on what seems to be a psychological account to support the original distinction. That is a cogent, serious, and productive line of criticism. There is much more of similar quality to be found in this book, and malenor should consider someday taking the trouble to read it.
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11 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Ronald E. Elam on February 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
For over a year now since I started on this forum I have
been reading great things about one Kant critic named
Jonathan Bennett. Today I finally managed to gather
up enough curiosity to find out what is so great about
this author. So I surfed on over to Amazon.com where
I knew they sometimes offered pages of excerpts from
books, and sure enough, Bennett's "Kant's Analytic"
was there to be perused just as if I were in a real book
store cracking open real books and sampling the
treats waiting inside the covers.
So far I am finding that Bennett's treatment of Kant
borders on the disdainful. You will find him pooh-poohing
the Transcendental Aesthetic as a minor work that
Kant makes too much out of: "Considered as a source
of cogent, detailed argument from true premisses to
interesting conclusions, the Aesthetic is not impressive" (4).
Nevertheless, Bennett declares that is necessary to
pay attention to the Aesthetic because it is "required
for an understanding of the *more mature and fruitful*
parts of the Critique." (Emphasis mine.)
Bennett's argument can be dealt with on so many levels
that it is hard to know exactly where to begin, and at
the same time build a coherent counterpoint. I often
encounter this problem when I come across a criticism
that is so off the mark about Kant that it requires a
whole restructuring of the person's intellectuality from
the foundations on up. Interestingly, this is exactly how
Kant proceeds in the work in question, from the foundations
of our intellect to the highest apex of reason.
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