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Karate: Beginner to Black Belt Hardcover – 1982

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Review

"Techniques and routines..illustrated in profuse detail..specially geared to a young adult audience." -- Kliatt Young Adult PB Guide --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 220 pages
  • Publisher: Thor Pub. Co; 1st edition (1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0874075203
  • ISBN-13: 978-0874075205
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,794,967 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 6, 1998
Format: Paperback
This particular text is geared primarily toward younger karate students which really comes as no surprise as the majority of Tegner's books have been staples of school and public libraries for years.Covers the basic techniques in clear, easy to understand language.Readers looking for more spectacular displays of footwork and sparring are best advised to go to Jordan Roth's Black Belt Karate where individual techniques are covered in far greater detail.Still, in fairness to Bruce he did make karate (and judo) accessible to a great number of people through his work and deserves a great deal of credit for such even though his name barely seems to rate a mention in martial arts circles these days.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Magellan HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on October 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
I credit Tegner with making a great deal of good martial arts information available at reasonable prices, starting in 1959 I remember right, with his book, "Karate, The Open Hand and Foot Fighting." At the time there wasn't much out there on most of these subjects--for example, his book on Savate--not to mention all the books he did on the Asian martial arts. Also, the books always came out in soft cover and were very reasonably priced. You could find them in public libraries and bookstores all over the country. I once found several at a country bookstore in South Dakota back in the late 60's.
The importance of this book for me is the presentation of the Shukokai style forms. You'll see these have significant stylistic differences from the well-known Shotokan and Goju-Kai forms. Also, the 90-move brown belt form is extremely long for a karate form--another interesting aspect of the book. The Shotokan Kwanku Dai form at 68 moves isn't nearly as long, although Goju-Kai has the Suparinpei form at 108 moves, which, of the 80 or so karate forms I learned at one time or another, is the longest I'm aware of.
I'd like to know more about the origin of these, as the Shukohkai school has a reputation for being quite conservative and sticking to their tradition. Another characteristic of Shukohkai stylists is their preference for free-fighting from the front stance. Technically, if I recall correctly, the Shukohkai school is basically the Tani-ha Shorin-Ryu style, one of a number of Shorin-Ryu substyles. My main exposure to Shorin-Ryu has been to the Kobayashi and Matsubayashi-Ryu substyles, as well as Isshin-Ryu. (I am primarily Shotokan, and Taekwondo myself).
Anyway, as someone interested in the history and evolution of the different styles and especially the forms, this is the only book I know of that presents these interesting forms. The book would be important and interesting if only for that, in addition to the presention of the basic karate techniques.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Over my more than 70 years of training both as a student and instructor of numerous martial art, (Judo, Jujitsu, Karate-Do, Kendo, Kenjutsu, Boxing, Wrestling, Combatives), I have read hundreds of books on the martial arts. When I began training in Judo and Karate I was in the U.S. Navy aboard a ship in Japan back in 1959. At that time I trained every minute I could spare, but also read anything and everything I could on Judo and Karate.

I continued my study over the years and read this book, Karate: Beginner to Black Belt by the late Bruce Tegner. The forms shown in this particular volume were somewhat different than I learned while training in Shotokan Karate; nevertheless, I did find this book of some value because it emphasized a non-mystical approach to karate. I learned later that the forms shown in this book had originally come from the Shukokai Karate style.

This volume shows the basic stances, punches, strikes, kicks and forms to advance in Bruce Tegner’s specific Karate method. He claims in his book that his system is based upon several different karate systems. Even though Bruce Tegner was often ignored by old style traditional karate people, his non-mystical approach was often appealing to western students.

Even though this book is dated; nevertheless, it is still a good book as a historical reference source of early karate training exercises and movements.

Be warned, however, that the form and techniques shown by his students in this book appears to be very weak compared to most formal karate styles like Shotokan, Gojoryu, Shitoryu and other Japanese and Okinawan styles.

Rating: 4 Stars. Joseph J. Truncale (Author: Shotokan Karate Self-Defense Techniques official manual of Bushi Satori Ryu)
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By Gary Bowes on December 9, 2014
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Bought this also to add to my Bruce Tegner book collection.
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