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Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good used copy: Some light wear to cover, spine and page edges. Very minimal writing or notations in margins. Text is clean and legible. Possible clean ex-library copy with their stickers and or stamps.
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Karate Boy Hardcover – July 1, 1996

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Waiting
Waiting
Waiting is a big part of childhood. Waiting in line, waiting to grow up, waiting for something special to happen. However, now a child sets the stage and pulls the strings in a timeless, heartfelt picture book about imaginative play, friendship, and surprises. Paperback | More for ages 3-5
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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

David practices karate at a dojo, where he is taught by a black-belt master, the sensei. In Karate Boy by Ann Morris, photographs by David Katzenstein, readers can look inside a martial arts classroom and learn some of the basic principles of karate, such as respect for opponents and the instructor.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 3?This book is one of few that introduces this martial art to young children. The large, full-color photographs and simple text allow even preschoolers to learn what happens in karate school. The story follows David as he is about to test for a promotion from blue belt to green. Despite the title, the photos feature both boys and girls of mixed ethnic backgrounds demonstrating typical stances, punches, kicks, and blocks. A short glossary defines karate lingo. This is not a title that teaches self-defense moves. It is a perfect introduction for those about to partake in lessons. In fact, it may even act as a substitute class for those kids to whom an interest in martial arts turns out to be a passing fancy.?Cathryn A. Camper, Minneapolis Public Library
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 700L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton Juvenile; 1st edition (July 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0525453377
  • ISBN-13: 978-0525453376
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 0.4 x 10.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,045,181 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Ann Morris's many books include Families, Bread Bread Bread, Hats Hats Hats, On the Go, and Loving. She lives in New York City. As a children's book writer, Ann Morris has been able to successfully integrate her varied experiences in teaching young children, travel, writing, and editing. Having grown up in the polyglot public schools of New York City, where each child's ethnic heritage was revealed by his name or by the contents of the lunch box from home filled with sausages, egg rolls, matzos, or pizza, she developed a strong Interest In cultures other than her own. "I'm a gypsy by nature," she says. "I always have my suitcase packed."
She and photographer Ken Heyman once traveled across the United States to document the lives often different families. Both she and the teacher's pupils liked the snake charmer/teacher who taught class in a circus trailer with her favorite boa around her neck. Although Ms. Morris has never tried this stunt he herself, she has taught children in public and private schools in New York City, and adults at Bank Street College, Columbia Teachers College, New York University, and Queens College of the City University of New York. More recently she has been teaching writing for children at The New School.
Ann Morris left teaching to become editorial director of Scholastic's early childhood department. Now she devotes her professional time to writing and all her other time to people watching, music in any and all Forms, cat care, cooking and eating, and travel. All of these experiences, she says, provide material for her books.
In Israel Ms. Morris was caught up in the enchantment of the place as well as the conflicts that are a consequence of its history. One of her books, When Will They Stop Fighting? (Atheneum), reflects her concern about children who have become the victims of these conflicts.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jule Kijek on July 12, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This well written books follows nine year old David and his best friend, Georgie, through their once a week karate classes. Young readers will learn that a dojo is the name for the studio, an obi is the color belt worn and that a senei is a teacher. Blocking, sparring, punching are taught with respect for your opponent. The books ends with David and Georgie taking and passing their green belt tests. This is a great first look at a karate class for children. It would be good for parents to buy for a child, boy OR girl, who is thinking about join this wonderful sport.
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