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VINE VOICEon January 2, 2014
The introduction is a bit wonky in that it seems rambling and a bit disjointed.
Additionally, this author seems to take just about every option that might fit into a a name or symbol and put it out there for your consideration. For example, Peeta, you will get the connection about bread, pita bread, and also the Pieta and the connection to Christlike love that Peeta exemplifies at the end of book two.

With those two considerations, this book is great. It really helped me to look at the characters and their names and the meaning and symbolism in a much deeper way. I found it to be useful. It also was not a difficult read, despite the many options that each name or symbol conjures up.

Well worth the money.
Enjoy.
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on May 8, 2012
I must say this book was fascinating! Valerie's research and detail were impeccable. If I may be so bold, I'd say beyond reproach.

The Hunger Games is special enough on its own, but when you read Valerie's in depth and fascinating analysis it takes on new meaning.
She has broken down what every name means in the entire trilogy. The symbolic nature of many of the items we think of as props (President Snows Roses, The Mockingjay) are clearly and intelligently defined too.

I will share a little "spoiler" to give you all an example: Seneca Crane, the gamemaker in The Hunger Games was executed because he was wrongly blamed for Katniss's defiant act with the poison berries.
Seneca Crane (he was a real man) was a Roman philosopher & playwright who was implicated in an assassination attempt of the Emperor Nero. He was in fact innocent but was sentenced to death by suicide.
Kinda cool huh? Suzanne Collins put MUCH thought, heart, and soul into her trilogy and characters. And it clearly shows. Valerie Frankel did all of the research for us and the end result is this seriously fabulous book any Hunger Games fan will enjoy for a long time to come.

There is more than explanation of names and symbols in this book. The section aptly titled "Allusion to Literature and Life" covers many topics such as "Dystopia" "History" "Reality TV" and more.
I was thoroughly impressed with this book from start to finish. It certainly made me look at one of my favorite trilogies through new eyes. I think you will enjoy it and all it has to offer too.

Originally on my blog [...]
Offering giveaway of signed edition of this book to my blogs followers
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on September 21, 2013
I was vaguely interested in the subject and thought I would pick this up. I figured I would learn at least a couple of things or make a few connections I missed when I read the books. I had seen the title before, but passed. It went on sale, so I bought it. Honestly i could ave done without it. If I were a teacher and had my class read Mockingjay series, this would have been good for me to use in a classroom. Or if I were a student writing a report on the books, this would have been a help.

If your not either of those things, pass. It's pretty much straight forward reasoning regarding the character names, etc....
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on May 8, 2014
An exploration by the author into the possible origins of the names used in the Hunger Games trilogy. I usually avoid books of this type as the author is trying to draw "meaning" out of a popular author's work. The only real way of doing that is to ask the author what they were thinking when they wrote the book. No really interesting facts in this book, just guesses about what the original author may have been thinking.

Waste of money, in my opinion.
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on July 16, 2013
While I loved the fun and drama of the Katniss trilogy , I must admit I don't care to know why Valorie used the nomenclature she did.
I mistakenly bought this book to quickly.
Maybe my granddaughter would like it.
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on February 8, 2014
I teach English to at-risk students. This synopsis of symbolic names and events from the Hunger Games Trilogy has added depth to my understanding of the novels, and given me a shorthand version to enhance lessons to my students. It will help bring history, literature, and folklore to my students through the riveting Hunger Games books.
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on June 17, 2013
Wow. This was totally interesting and illuminating to read. As a huge fan of the Hunger Game series, I had no idea of how much these books reflected on history and of mythology. This makes a very interesting read. I am sure I will read it over and over when the new movies come out to reference the information pertaining to the final two movies. Well worth the read.
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on January 21, 2014
I just went speed reading through this to satisfy my curiosity about the names in The Hunger Games. This book does the trick, but I deleted it from my device because I don't think I'll be inclined to refer to it in the future.
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on July 7, 2013
Wasn't bad, but it didn't blow me away either. I guess I was just expecting a few more "oh my god I never realized that" moments. For the price, though, it makes a great little quick read on a lazy afternoon.
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on September 19, 2012
I haven't even read the whole thing and I don't need to. Cattail and Katniss are two totally different things, as anyone with any kind of plant book can easily figure out. Cattail is a tall, reedy marsh plant that tops out with a velvety brown tubelike node of spores. Katniss is an older name for "Arrowhead" which is also a marsh plant that has arrow shaped leaves and white flowers and doesn't stand taller than a person's knee. Yep, both are edible. I can dig both up from around the pond behind my house. What the heck is this author even going on about? Did she do ANY research before writing this book?
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