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Katy and the Big Snow (Vol 2) Paperback – September 28, 2009


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 2
  • Lexile Measure: 420L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 40 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers; Stk edition (September 28, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0395185629
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395185629
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 8.7 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (76 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #25,341 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

This old-fashioned tale about one little snowplow's determination in the face of a small-town blizzard has all the charm and moral grit of The Little Engine That Could. This isn't surprising, considering that Caldecott Medal-winning author Virginia Lee Burton (The Little House) specializes in bringing the inanimate to life with endearing illustrations and stories of fortitude and vulnerability. Katy, a red crawler tractor, "could do a lot of things," Burton explains early on. In the summer she is a bulldozer, helping to build and repair roads in the city of Geoppolis. In the winter, she turns into a snowplow, waiting and waiting for her chance to be useful. Most of the winters, though, the snowfalls are mild and the town doesn't need Katy. But when the big one finally hits, the town is buried in page after page of powder. The power lines are down. The doctor can't get his patient to the hospital. The fire department can't reach a burning house! "Everyone and everything was stopped but... KATY!" Suddenly, the entire community is dependent on one little snowplow. Children love witnessing Katy's shining moment of glory and will inevitably admire her "chug, chug, chug" endurance. (Ages 4 and older) --Gail Hudson

Review

"Bright, vigorous pictures with plenty of action and endless detail portray Katy at work for the Highway Department of the city of Geoppolis." -- Review

More About the Author

Virginia Lee Burton was the talented author and illustrator of some of the most enduring books ever written for children. The winner of the 1942 Caldecott Medal for The Little House, Burton's books include heroes and happy endings, lively illustrations, and a dash of nostalgia. She lived with her two sons, Aristides and Michael, and her husband George Demetrios, the sculptor, in a section of Gloucester, Massachusetts, called Folly Cove. Here she taught a class in design and from it emerged the Folly Cove designers, a group of internationally known professional artisans.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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I loved this book as a child.
Ben Campbell
The story is very well written and illustrations are wonderful for little kids to follow along with.
J. Wallace
Doesn't matter what the season this is a great book to read to your kids.
MrsG08

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 23, 2000
Format: Hardcover
For some reason it always surprises me a little that my older son loves classic children's books like this one so much. It shouldn't---they are classics for a reason! This book has so many great little details---the map of the town, the images of the town slowly being opened up to activity by being plowed out, and of course the train and tracks which makes the book for my son! He loves the idea also that Katy is tired at the end of the big day---it's started real discussions about whether machines can really be tired, and I think helped him understand how authors can fictionalize things to give you a feeling for the themes and ideas in a book.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Shanshad VINE VOICE on February 25, 2005
Format: Paperback
Readers familiar with Virginia Lee Burton will know her penchant for bringing inanimate objects to life. This is a wonderful addition to those books, perfect for young children between the ages of 2 and 6. This story was a favorite in my household when I was a child, much to the dismay of my mother who wished we would select anything else for a change! (She got sick of reading it more than once a week) ^_^

The star of this book, in case anyone hasn't guessed, is a tractor named Katy who is a bulldozer in the summer and a snowplow in the winter in the city of Geopolis. Geopolis could be any small city. When a huge blizzard leaves several feet of snow behind, it is up to Katy to save the day, getting everyone where they need to go in Geopolis. As the only vehicle that hasn't been stopped by the snow, Katy must prove her toughness and sense of duty by spending the whole day clearing the streets, earning a satisfying and well-needed rest at the end of the story. That's really the whole story. Sound a bit uneventful? Well, yes. There's never a doubt that Katy will succeed in her task. There isn't a great deal of interaction with human characters besides getting them where they are going. So for a child who wants a complex plot more along the lines of MIKE MULLIGAN AND HIS STEAM SHOVEL, they may be disappointed. But, as I said, this book was a favorite in my house, and there were several reasons why.

Repetition: stories for younger children with regularly repeated phrases like this one are worthwhile to the listener, if not always the reader. Throughout the book the main line-`"Follow me," said Katy'--is repeated every time Katy happens across more citizens in need. Children will soon be providing that line on their own in the course of the story.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 29, 1999
Format: Hardcover
At 51 years of age and very recently a first time grandfather with the aid of Amazon.com I started searching for my favorite stories from decades ago. All of Dr.Suess and the Little Engine That Could to Thorton Burgess's many publications that make me smile so many years later. Of all my past memories Katy and the Big Snow was one that I checked out of our local Library at least 3 times a month. It taught me that determination is most important in acheiving goals and that good things come to those who wait and endure. These are the types of books our younger generation should be reading instead of what is available on television these days. I hope someday my Grandchildren will come to enjoy this book as I have.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jim on November 21, 1999
Format: Hardcover
when i was 6 or so i would ride my bike to the library and just read this book. i had all but forgotten about it when i saw it in a store the other day. about 25 years later i think i see some lessons i learned from katy. i also remeber fondly, the giving tree and where the wild things are, as well as schoolhouse rock as positive mental stimulants.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 31, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I ordered this book for my son for his 7th b'day. He loves anything to do with transportation, and discovered Mike Mulligan and his steam shovel first. He checked that book out of the school library every week for more than a month, then I helped him find Katy and the Big Snow, and he loved it just as much. I remember enjoying these books when I was a child, and I think it is wonderful that books like these still bring enjoyment to the children today.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By sarah on November 14, 2011
Format: Board book
What do you give a modern boy or girl to read that breaks the stereotype that machines are masculine and princesses and kittens are feminine?

Katy and the Big Snow is the answer to your Christmas, holiday, and general book-purchasing needs! In the tradition of Mike Mulligan and the Steam Shovel, Katy is a non-anthropomorphic but named bulldozer who harnesses her amazing strength to save the town of Geoppolis from a terrible blizzard. When the truck-mounted snow plows try but fail, Katy is taken out of storage and leads the town out of imminent peril. This is Virginia Lee Burton at her absolute best, and I can only guess that she didn't receive a Caldecott when Katy was published in 1943 because Little House had just won it the year before. Tiny, detailed drawings dominate the page and reward the careful reader who takes the time to examine each one. Residents of a burning house toss tiny furniture from their windows. Skiiers tumble down hills. An almost taxonomic study of portable generators, steam shovels, dumptrucks, and all their kin ring the border of a page. Illustrations that are afterthoughts in this book would be the highlight of any other.

The best of all is a two-page spread with a small drawing of Katy in the upper corner and otherwise bare pages: this is Katy plowing through untouched, blanketing snow. It's a brave illustration and bold even now.

The entire book evokes feelings of both heroism, bravery, and coziness. It's the perfect book for anyone who enjoys snuggling up in a snowstorm, and the perfect medicine for little boys who refuse to read about anything but trucks and other little boys. Katy is a feminist before her time and a necessary companion to any purchase of Mike Mulligan.
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