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60 of 64 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A warm, authentic, restrained bluesy affair.
The ever-enduring crooner returns with a collection of stripped-back, simple songs diverging how it feels to be reaching the twilight of life. Yet Van Morrison keeps all the controlled energy of someone who still has something to pass on to the world.
"Keep It Simple" is a mainly bluesy affair. He's returned to the usual mixture of autobiographical fare and the kind...
Published on April 1, 2008 by Micki Zackary

versus
155 of 180 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Average Van Still Better Than Most
Keep It Simple - like most latter day Van Morrison - is neither as brilliant as you might hope, nor as disappointing as you might fear.

The problem, for me, is the decline of Morrison's songwriting. While he was never a lyricist in the class of Dylan or Joni Mitchell, he could once conjure marvelous images and had a poet's ear. He also had the vocal chops -...
Published on April 2, 2008 by Steve Ford


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60 of 64 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A warm, authentic, restrained bluesy affair., April 1, 2008
By 
This review is from: Keep It Simple (Audio CD)
The ever-enduring crooner returns with a collection of stripped-back, simple songs diverging how it feels to be reaching the twilight of life. Yet Van Morrison keeps all the controlled energy of someone who still has something to pass on to the world.
"Keep It Simple" is a mainly bluesy affair. He's returned to the usual mixture of autobiographical fare and the kind of mix of jazz, folk, blues, country and soul that may be chock-full of lyrical cliche but is always lifted by a voice that really hasn't deteriorated much in the last twenty years. Let's face it: the blues wouldn't be the blues without it's lyrical template. It's the way it's sung that matters, and Van is still peerless in this respect.
Husky, slurred, simple yet honest, the album is one enduring constant is in its title: the acceptance that less is more and that with restraint true quality always prevails.
After five decades of prolific and heart-felt melodies this is amazingly Van Morrison's 33rd studio album but is shows as much dedication as many new artist's debut.
His first recording of original material since 2005 it's also the first album penned solely by Van Morrison's own hand since "Back On Top" in 1999.
You have to try very to hard to find Van Morrison doing much wrong and even when he's not breaking new ground there's still generally enough going on to keep his music worth a listen.
On this one, he does more than just tow the line and even offers up one or two gems in the making - "Lover Come Back" and "End Of The Land" prove in particular why he's not yet disappeared into retirement.
There's a certain grace to Van's stripped-back band and as always he evokes images of sorrow and anguish but with such beauty and warmth that you can't help but smile when you hear him.
It maybe that he has already reached his peak, but what "Keep It Simple" proves is that with the right combination of sensitivity and commitment to his art Van Morrison can still stay ahead the rest of the field and, what's more important, can do it with dignity.
The CD is a better Van Morrison album than anyone had a right to expect - not least on its closing song. Fanning out from a rimshot-riding mandolin phrase, the killer track "Behind the Ritual" returns to a theme that has informed his best songs from "Into the Mystic" and on.
Drinking wine and dancing like a dervish, Van finds "the spiritual behind the ritual".
The supporting cast acquit themselves admirably as well. Of special note is the steel guitar of Cindy Cashdollar (of Asleep At The Wheel). The only downside is that the backing vocals are a trifle over-egged at times.
But on the whole this is a lovely welcome back to a man who's been increasingly offhand in his output of late.
It may look simple, but only a master like Van could pull this off.
Another career high from a great original in the 40th anniversary year of his classic "Astral Weeks".
Simple, but totally brilliant.
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155 of 180 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Average Van Still Better Than Most, April 2, 2008
By 
Steve Ford (Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Keep It Simple (Audio CD)
Keep It Simple - like most latter day Van Morrison - is neither as brilliant as you might hope, nor as disappointing as you might fear.

The problem, for me, is the decline of Morrison's songwriting. While he was never a lyricist in the class of Dylan or Joni Mitchell, he could once conjure marvelous images and had a poet's ear. He also had the vocal chops - blending jazz, blues and soul - to create a unique style of music. Where immobile steel rims crack /And the ditch in the back roads stop /Could you find me? /Would you kiss-a my eyes? /To lay me down /In silence easy /To be born again (Astral Weeks) Those words read well off the page, but as performed by Van Morrison, they were magic. As a singer, he had no peer, and the combination of his words and music lifted Morrison into the highest echelon - alongside Dylan and Mitchell. His best songs were autobiographical but universal, beautifully crafted, tinged with mystery and ambiguity.

While he has had many ups and downs along the way, the deterioration of Morrison's lyrics might be traced to the otherwise triumphant Hymns to the Silence (1991). Since then, there have been a raft of songs about the woes of being Van Morrison in the music business - Professional Jealousy, Why Must I Always Explain?, Big Time Operators, Songwriter, They Sold Me Out, and now, School of Hard Knocks. Then there are the songs about the woes of simply being Van Morrison - Some Peace of Mind, Too Long In Exile, Melancholia, Underlying Depression. Now there's Don't Go the Nightclubs Anymore.

Morrison's response to criticism of his self-absorption is the title song of Keep It Simple: They mocked me 'cos I told it like it was/Wrote about disappointment and greed/Wrote about what we really didn't need in our lives/Make us feel alive and whole.

That brings us to the real problem, which is not so much Morrison's subject matter as his execution. Lyrically, Don't Go To Nightclubs Anymore and Keep It Simple (to give but two examples) are simply uninspired. They are too literal, like unedited diary entries. It's one thing to keep it simple, another to make it banal.

Too many recent Van Morrison songs lack any real insight or imagination, let alone the sparkling imagery and wordplay of which he is (or was) capable. At worst, they are little more than a pastiche of hackneyed phrases.

The biggest disappointment on Keep It Simple is Behind the Ritual, in which he literally sings blah blah blah blah. The effect, from the man who sang Madame George and made an art form of repetition (the loves to love/ the loves to love) is self-parody.

So why three stars? Because, lyrics aside, Keep It Simple is a fair collection of songs. They don't score highly for originality, but at this stage of Morrison's career, you wouldn't expect that. The arrangements hardly have a hair out of place. Sans horn section, the album has a consistent, intimate groove. Although there are a variety of song forms (blues, folk, pop) the album feels all of a piece. The band is excellent, especially long-time sideman John Allair on the B3, and the singer, he's Van Morrison for Christ's sake.

The radio-friendly That's Entrainment is the brightest moment - a simple three chords, an infectious underlying rhythm, and a clever play on words (entertainment/entrainment) make this a contender for future 'best of' compilations. Lover Come Back is a simple but effective song of yearning. Song of Home is a nostalgic, folky piece with a lovely sense of place, providing the welcome Celtic quota.

It's worth pondering what you'd make of Keep It Simple if you'd never heard of Van Morrison. My best guess is that I would regard the album as quite a find. (There aren't many unknowns, after all, who can sing like Van Morrison.) The point is that any new work by an artist of Morrison's stature will inevitably be assessed against the standards of the artist's best work.

A lot of new music is lightweight, blatantly derivative, gimmicky, or ephemeral in its appeal. Keep It Simple is none of those. It's better than most stuff that makes it onto, ummm, polycarbonate.

This CD is certainly worth a listen, and there's much to recommend it. Just don't pay too much attention to the words.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars He's back!!, May 24, 2008
By 
Mary E. Canini (hobe sound, florida United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Keep It Simple (Audio CD)
With his latest work, "Keep it Simple", Van is once again the man! I purchased his "Down the Road" CD several years ago and found it to be good, but somewhat uninspired, and all the songs start to sound the same. After resigning myself to the fact that his music would probably only be mediocre at this stage of his life I was VERY pleasantly surprised to find Van going back to his soulful roots with this new album. It has a retro yet fresh feeling to it with the incorporation of the female backing vocals and the organ. The songs are really moving like his early works were in the 70's. I also enjoy the lyrics in these songs as he sees life from the perspective of a man his age. I give him a lot of credit to put out a piece of work like this at this point in his career.... when the creative juices are usually dried up! "Keep It Simple" is a work of art kept simple. I would totally recommend buying this if you're a Van fan!
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30 of 35 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mellow and Soulful, April 11, 2008
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This review is from: Keep It Simple (Audio CD)
If anyone has any doubts as to whether Van Morrison retains a substantial fan base, just a glance at the large number of reviews written for Keep It Simple in the two weeks since its release should dispel them. Read the reviews and you will see that the fan base is passionate as well. Now some folks like to live in the musical past and have a particular album in mind by which they gauge all others. That's kind of unfair to the artist. You don't want all Van Morrison albums to sound like the one that is your favorite, do you? I don't. While I have my favorite Van Morrison albums, I want to hear him play something new and possibly great everytime he makes a record.
It's natural of course to make comparisons, but I try to hear an album rise or fall on its own merits. And though Keep It Simple will probably not be seen as one of Morrison's best, it has quite a lot going for it. For one, it is mellow and is one of the most soulful records he's made in a long time. My favorites are How Can A Poor Boy?, Don't Go To Nightclubs Anymore, and Song of Home. There is nothing unlistenable except the blah, blah, blah passage in the final cut that almost ruins it. Some say that Van is having a little fun there, but its at our expense. Given the subject of the song, maybe the most charitable interpretation would be that he is expressing what he thinks about the chatter of the jabbering drunks he's leaving in his past.
Those who buy Keep It Simple will get nearly fifty minutes of music and a small booklet containing lyrics and all the info about who plays what on which song. Most people who have followed Van Morrison's career for years will like this album just fine. I like it as least as well as his last album and will certainly listen again from time to time.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly brilliant, May 24, 2008
This review is from: Keep It Simple (Audio CD)
On first listen I was disappointed at the opening numbers--seemingly throw-away songs that reminded me of Van as his most uninspiring moments. Some of your are already getting ready to click and comment on this reviewer's cluelessness, but let me finish. Van's best work is among the most soul-felt work an artist has ever produced, and he's left a very high bar for what the lover of his work wishes for. Somewhere into the cd, Van delivers: "Keep it Simple" is a fine cut, but "End of the Land" is just about as fine and blue-eyed-Belfast soul as anything else VM has ever offered to his listeners. "Behind the Ritual" is another gem that gives us Van in the zone that makes us forgive some of his less successful efforts. I started listening to the c.d. with those three cuts programmed first, and all of a sudden the lesser tracks started opening up. I'm not too picky--all I want is brilliance before I accept the more humble songs. If you're willing to make up your own track list, I think you'll start to see that this is one of the cd's worthy of the artist who gave the world some of the best music in the last 45 years. Thank you Van. Thank you.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back to the Mystic, May 1, 2008
By 
JRadz (Montclair, NJ USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Keep It Simple (Audio CD)
I had high hopes when Van signed with roots rock label Lost Highway. But after several lackluster records - including the dreadful "What's wrong with this picture" and the dull country record "Pay the devil" - Van has delivered the record I've been imagining. The material and his singing are strong, as are the arrangements and production, and the whole cd has a wonderful organic feel to it. There are a few vague references to "the myth" and "propaganda" (on "What's Wrong...", his paranoid musings made him sound mentally ill), but overall, these are Van's strongest batch of songs in a long while, maybe since "Into the Music." Makes a great companion piece with Dylan's "Modern Times."
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lyrical, brilliant, human, SOULFUL, April 25, 2008
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This review is from: Keep It Simple (Audio CD)
Thank you, thank you, thank you for a record that cuts through BS. If you've been moved to tears by Springsteen's wish to "hear some rhythm" that could obliterate Radio Nowhere, this is the record for you. The moment I heard Van's voice I realized how starving I was for real music, a real man's voice, and a singer whose technique was technique-less. This is RADIO SOMEWHERE.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Unwind, May 25, 2008
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This review is from: Keep It Simple (Audio CD)
Van Morrison's What's Wrong With This Picture? put three songs in my personal top ten including my #1 "Evening In June" plus "Once in a Blue Moon" & "Whinin' Boy Moan." When Van is hot, the singer reaches blast furnace temperatures and is emotionally incendiary. He enjoys the unique position of being able to follow his muse and allow his audience to follow. In so doing, his artistry remains high in his best moments.

"Keep It Simple" has some excellent moments. "That's Entrainment" is a delightful track with the classic Morrison sway, part soul, part jazz, "You with your ballerina dance, well you put me back in a trance." I had to look up "entrain" which means "enter or put into railway train." I'm not sure I totally get the connection, but I love the sound. "Lover Come Back" is such a classically good song that I had to check to see that Van wasn't covering some standard that had escaped my attention. His voice bubbles over with emotion, "Since you went away, I'm a lonely, lonely one; Come on back to stay; you are the only one." "End of the Land" is exquisite with its sense of rejuvenation that comes from the oceanside. "Keep It Simple" has some classic Morrison tracks and is a delightful disc by which to unwind. Enjoy!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Van Morrison in Goteborg, Sweden, April 26, 2008, April 28, 2008
By 
C. Butler (Kristianstad, Sweden - an American ex-Patriot) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Keep It Simple (Audio CD)
On Saturday, April 26, 2008, I attended Van Morrison's concert tour for the KEEP IT SIMPLE album in Goteborg, Sweden. Prompt, as always, the show began at 7:30pm with a cast of 11 musicians + a couple of female backing vocals. His performance was all business and was being recorded "Live", as evidenced by three separate stations manned by sound engineers. His mastery of the instruments chosen for the show, being his Tenor Sax and Pocket Harp, Guitar and Ukelele was performed with jazzman's precision, but more evident was his voice that has never abandoned him and has only improved with age.

The show was a bit slow at the start and he played a little more country than I would have preferred, but eventually he got things rollin' and got the Swedish crowd a-clappin' and their feet a-tappin'. He had brought together some great musicians for the album and tour band. Especially, a young woman who I believe her name was Sarah Jory? Am not certain of her name, as Van never noted anyone's name (not like him - unusual) and there was no program available. Anyway, she played Steel Guitar and Slide, on what appeared to be a "Resonator 0 Style" Guitar (you may remember the guitar featured on the cover of Dire Straits - Brothers in Arms album?). This young lady musician was everywhere, playing leads, singing vocals, and proved her varied talents by giving one heck-of-a demonstration of her rhythmic musical ability by performing "hand-clapping" on "That's Entrainment", which is barely heard on the album, but greatly enjoyed by myself and everyone in the live performance. [According to Webster, the word "ENTRAINMENT" (not, Entertainment) a verb, meaning: "To go, or put aboard a train." Beats me, what he's relating to here, but maybe somebody will post on [...] in the future].

A highlight of the show and the turning point in mood (at least for me) was when Van reintroduced an old favorite "Saint James Infirmary", which I haven't heard him play for years. It was an excellent arrangement and the band excelled in this old New Orelans standard. It got the blues a-flowin' from him and for the next 45-minutes it was all uphill.

Also, enjoyable was the inclusion into the band of an electric violin played by fiddler Tony Fitzgibbon; and, the Hammond B3 Organ of John Allair. That reminds me every time I hear a musician playing the B3; it brings back memories of the musician, known as "The B3 Beast" - Lee Michaels, who Van certainly remembers from his early San Francisco days. Nobody has yet to match, or even duplicate Lee on the B3, but I keep hoping somebody will appear, whereas, after 6-albums in 4-years, Lee disappeared in 1971, never to be heard from again.

Van the Man, took one bow returning to the stage to perform "Brown-Eyed Girl' and finished with "G-L-O-R-I-A", to an aroused standing hand-clapping and foot-stomping full house. Business like, the show ended at 9:00pm, and everything he had to say was said in that eventful and enjoyable performance.

All-in-all, this album is certainly worth the price. Regardless, of what the critics say, as they only sharpen their pencils to deliver venom at their favorite target, whereas, Van (at least these days) has chosen the high road and applies his five decades of proven talent, as songsmith the creation of lyrics and tune that will far outlast whatever his critics may write. Rave on John Donne! RAVE ON!

If you get the opportunity, be sure YOU don't miss Van's "Live Performance" of the KEEP IT SIMPLE tour.

MAY 15, 2008 - ADDED TO MY ORIGINAL REVIEW (ABOVE) OF APRIL 28, 2008

Earlier last month I wrote a review after attending Van's LIVE concert in Goteborg, Sweden for his "Keep It Simple" album. At that time I rated his new album with 4-Stars, but have up'd my rating after listening numerous times to a more deserved 5-Stars album! In fact, this is the best writing the 'master songsmith' has done since "Astral Weeks," and he may well be on the verge of delivering his best works ever!

Now for those that have complained about his "Blah, Blah, Blah" on the last track - "Behind The Ritual" - get a grip, as he's making jest of himself, as well as anyone who gets loose behind drinking from the "Nectar of the Gods", and enjoying conversation with good friends. If, you've been there then you'll understand the "Blah, Blah, Blah"? To prove my point, next time you're enjoying the company of good friends, pour yourself a glass of wine put "Behind the Ritual" on REPEAT. Believe me, when the evening is over and your friends have departed the song will be playing over n' over in your head for days to come. Maybe then you'll get it! Enjoy!

And as for those who hear Van the Man complaining in his songs about show biz record promoters and syndicators, then you probably not a real fan of the blues, or you'd be aware that John Lee Hooker often sang about these same "Predators and Leeches" of the recording industry, as does Morrison.

Rave on John Donne... RAVE ON!
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19 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars SOME GOOD MUSIC AND SOME RESPECTABLE SONGS - BUT A BIT TOO SIMPLE ?, April 1, 2008
This review is from: Keep It Simple (Audio CD)
Before reviewing this album, perhaps I should say that I only have 4 VM albums - 'Astral Weeks, 'Moondance' (both originally on vinyl), 'Tupelo Honey' and 'Veedon Fleece'; so any comparisons that I make, are with the music from these albums. Apart from the odd song, I am not familiar with his more recent stuff.

Turning to 'Keep It Simple' :

THE VOCALS - Sometimes I've found VM's voice, especially on the high notes, to be too jarring for my ears; but his vocals on 'Keep It Simple' have a smoother and 'lived in' quality - also, his singing is (intentionally ?) slurred at times. Whilst his vocals are quite soulful, they seem to lack some of the passion and intensity to be found on earlier albums. His delivery is, comparatively, straight forward - it's missing much of the unusual phrasing and improvisations that I have come to expect (but you do get the occasional flourish).

THE SONGS - The blurb in the product description talks about 'gorgeous songs rich with emotion, depth and beauty'. Well I certainly wouldn't go this far, whoever wrote this should listen to songs such as 'Cyprus Avenue', 'Madame George', 'Slim Slow Slider', 'Into The Mystic', 'Brand New Day', 'Tupelo Honey', 'Linden Arden Stole The Highlights', 'Streets of Arklow' or 'Country Fair' - in my opinion, these are all exceptionally fine songs. 'Keep It Simple' is a very different album from the ones that I already own, and the songs on it are consistent with the contemplative mood and subdued ambience of the album. Comparing the songs on 'Keep It Simple', with those that I've cited from earlier albums, is rather like comparing 'oranges with bananas' - both fruit and both sweet, but stimulating different sets of taste buds. Nevertheless having said this, I think the songs on 'Keep It Simple' are OK to reasonably good (apart from one or two) - but I don't think any are exceptional.

THE PRODUCTION AND PLAYING - The production and arrangements (by the man himself) are superb, and the overall feel of the album is warm and relaxed (I'd say a very natural and 'unadulterated' sound) - and there is also a slight edginess to the music. VM seems to have assembled some fine musicians here, instruments played include : guitars (acoustic, electric, steel and bass), organ/piano, percussion/drums, harmonica, fiddle, ukulele, banjo, mandolin, accordion and saxophone - there is plenty of instrumental variety. The playing is elegant and restrained (apart from John Allair, who occasionally cuts loose on the Hammond organ*), and it more than adequately, adds extra texture to the music as it 'glides and grooves' behind the vocals (*the album features a few short solos by John Allair and his flamboyant, yet graceful, style of playing is a delight). I'm a bit surprised that some pre-release reviews describe the album's sound as 'stripped back' - I usually associate this with sparse acoustic or semi-acoustic accompaniment and 'hands off' production; but this is not the case on 'Keep It Simple' - there is more instrumental depth than the term 'stripped back' would imply.

Some brief comments about the songs which appealed to me most :

HOW CAN A POOR BOY - A slow shuffling blues number; VM's delivery is perfect for this type of song; some great playing and backing vocals from the band - don't miss the fine harmonica (Ned Edwards) and terrific organ solo (John Allair). Also, listen out for how the sound is slightly pared down at about 4 minutes into the song. Good music, well performed.

LOVER COME BACK - A wistful love song and, although I think the song itself is a little nondescript, it's a gently swaying waltz with some strong vocals from VM; it also includes some tasteful organ and outstanding steel guitar playing (Cindy Cashdollar).

END OF THE LAND - A slow tempo, soulful song with something of a 'classic' VM spirituality about it. It features a brief organ solo and some fluent electric guitar playing (John Platania, I think) - more good music, 'short but sweet'.

BEHIND THE RITUAL - A slow to mid-tempo song - a mix of country blues and gospel, and having a slight mystical quality (another song with a 'classic' VM feel to it). With its infectious syncopated rhythms, the song quiety grooves along. VM fills one verse with 'blah' at least 30 times - not many singers could get away with this, and I'm not convinced he does either (still, it's only one verse!). At 7 minutes, I thought the song was a little too long.

Some of the remaining songs are also well worth a listen - but 'School of Hard Knocks', 'Song of Home' and 'No Thing' didn't do a great deal for me.

By VM standards, 'Keep It Simple' is a fairly mellow, 'easy on the ear' album, i.e. it doesn't place quite the same demands upon the listener as does some of the music from his early albums. Whilst the music is subtle and far from superficial, in terms of the transcendent qualities of his music, I think 'Keep It Simple' falls well short of 'Astral Weeks' or 'Veedon Fleece' (but this aspect of VM's music might not be of interest to you).

Not having bought a VM album for many years, and eagerly anticipating an album of new songs all penned by him, I was looking forward to 'Keep It Simple' - initially, it was an anti-climax, but some of the tracks have since grown on me. It contains half a dozen or so decent songs and those who like' laid back' music with reflective lyrics and a 'bluesy-jazzy-soulful' sound (with a dash of Gaelic folk, country and gospel here and there) may well enjoy it immensely - particularly, if you are not too steeped in VM's early music. VM and his musicians seem more than capable of delivering this type of music and, I should add, not without a certain amount of flair also. However, fans wanting more of his energetic R&B-type music or songs with a strong country flavour, will find little of interest on this album.

So, I am somewhat ambivalent about 'Keep It Simple'; with many of his early albums, VM set the bar high and, with this in mind, I find it difficult to rate 'Keep It Simple' higher than 3 stars. On the other hand, he still produces music of a calibre that many contemporary artists can only aspire to. It's probably one of those albums that benefits from repeated listens - it's music that gets 'into your soul' rather than 'in your face'.

VM ? - he's still alright, he's 'alright with me' (but only just).
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Keep It Simple
Keep It Simple by Van Morrison (Audio CD - 2008)
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