Keeper of the Keys and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.98
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: This book has already been well loved by someone else and that love shows. It MIGHT have highlighting, underlining, be missing a dust jacket, or SLIGHT water damage, but over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Keeper of the Keys Hardcover – October 31, 2006


See all 23 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$0.99 $0.01
Year-End%20Deals%20in%20Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Delacorte Press; 1st edition (October 31, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385337965
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385337960
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,723,485 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This stand-alone novel of suspense from bestseller O'Shaughnessy (Case of Lies and 10 other legal thrillers starring Nina Reilly) has a glamorous setting, Los Angeles's Topanga Canyon, where a once promising architect, Ray Jackson, lives in a house he designed with his furniture-maker wife, Leigh. Unfortunately, despite some good plot twists and pinkish herrings, none of the characters is particularly interesting—not Ray, a tightly wound man who spends his time making models of every house he lived in during his tangled childhood; not Leigh, who may have a buried sex life; and especially not Kat and Jackie, two sisters in the real estate trade who used to be close to Leigh growing up. When Leigh disappears without a trace one night, Ray only with the greatest of reluctance (and nudges from Kat and the cops) sifts through secrets old and new for a truth that's as hard to swallow as it is to care about. Perri O'Shaughnessy is the pseudonym of sisters Pamela and Mary O'Shaughnessy. (Nov.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

The best-selling author of the Nina Reilly series (in actuality two sisters writing under a pseudonym) veers off in a new direction with this stand-alone thriller. When Leigh Jackson disappears, her architect husband, Ray, doesn't seem all that worked up about it. But when his wife's old friend, Kat, shows up, hurling accusations, Ray realizes he has some explaining to do. Using a set of keys to every home he's ever lived in, Ray revisits his past, trying to find out if he is capable of the thing Kat suspects he might have done. And he uncovers truths about himself so deep and so dark that he begins to question his own identity. The book is a welcome breath of fresh air, especially for readers who've lost interest in the stodgily formulaic Reilly series. This is a well-paced, smartly written thriller with an ambiguous protagonist and a genuinely mysterious mystery to be solved. The dialogue could use a bit more polishing, but, given the novel's virtues, that's a small quibble. David Pitt
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

I loved all of the books in the Nina Reilly series but this book was a huge disappointment.
D. Gifford
I had decided not to even finish it because it seemed like a waste of time, but I kept reading thinking it would get better, and I wanted to give the book a chance.
L Gott
The characters ane for the most part unbelieveable and at the end the plot resolution made no sense.
Albert Leary

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Speedy Reader on December 25, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I've read all the books in the Nina Reilly series and they were really enjoyable but this stand alone attempt is pretty bad. The writing is long winded and convoluted, the story does not play out well and by the end you realize it doesn't make a bit of sense. I truly hope they go back to the style of writing they are used to and get off this path quickly. This book was a real disappointment.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A. A. Tranmer on January 24, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I won't even go bore you with the storyline of this novel, because that might make it sound interesting and the absolute last thing I want to accomplish in this review it to give you any inclination to read this book. To put it eloquently, it sucked--though not hard enough or long enough to be worth even a good laugh. Don't waste your precious time on it. The whole thing is gratingly cliché. Plow as you will through the miry cast of annoyingly trite characters and mediocre prose in order to ultimately discover the big twist you are so obviously set up for, the big surprise will leave you so thoroughly unsatisfied you just might have to take a cold shower.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Greer on November 25, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I am a Perri O'Shaughnessy fan and eagerly look forward to each new book. However, I must say this book was a complete and total disappointment. The storyline is confusing and completely uninteresting. There is nothing about this story that keeps the reader's attention. I am trying to finish this book but at page 230, it's so boring and dry, I don't think I can keep going.

I highly recommend the Nina Reilly series but unfortunately, this book is no where the calibur of writing exhibited in that series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Groh on March 23, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I really like all of Perri O'Shaughnessy's books. The Nina Reilly character is a really well fleshed-out character. Unfortunately, none of the characters in this book are ; whether it be Ray Jackson, his wife Leigh, or her childhood friend Kat. I started this book twice and finally muddled through it. It's a horrible story, with a confusing plot and no real crime. I'm thankful at least that I didn't spend any money on it and borrowed it instead from the Library. Skip this book and pick up any of the Nina Reilly series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Loves to Read on November 8, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I have every book that Perri O'Shaughnessy has written and have enjoyed them all--until this one. Sorry ladies.

I found this story too slow moving and weird. A man's wife leaves him after an argument and is missing for several days. Instead of looking for her or enlisting the aid of the police, friends, and family, (he has strange priorites) he uses old keys (please people, if you buy a new house, get the locks changed)to break into houses where he use to live--he is looking for clues to his past as his mother won't tell him anything about his deceased father and why they so often moved.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Douglas Hunt on November 14, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I am a great fan of these writers. That alone is why I purchased this book, however, I hope this isn't the only new direction they are taking, if it is I am afraid they just lost a big fan. I am sure they want to write something different than Nina novels but if they do they need to write on at least the Nina level!

Characters and storyline were dull, the best part was the area of the country the book centered on.I only completed the book because I bought it and felt I owed it to the ladies to see what else they write. I know they worked hard at it.

I do look forward, as I always do, to the next book by P.O'S.. However,if the preview doesn't include Nina,the reading of 2 dull books in a row (including "Sinister Shorts") will have seriously damped my interest in these writers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By L Gott on October 3, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have never written a review about a book before, but this one was so bad I felt compelled to help others avoid the mistake of buying it as I did...too bad I didn't read the other reviews first myself.

It seemed disjointed and repetitive (perhaps a problem with having two authors??). There were lots of cliches and a lot of bad writing that sounded like a horny teenage boy came up with it. I like to be given a little credit as a reader, and not have the author repeat the same thing over and over again, as if I couldn't pick up on it the first or second or third time. But I lost track of how many times the book mentioned the traffic in LA, or the burnt, ugly landscape. The characters weren't very interesting or likable, and I found myself not caring what happened to any of them.

I had decided not to even finish it because it seemed like a waste of time, but I kept reading thinking it would get better, and I wanted to give the book a chance. I had guessed the ending long before I got to the last pages, and it seemed to be the culmination of a bad story that only got published because the authors had managed some halfway decent books in the past. This is the kind of book that makes me not want to read another mystery again. It was my first O'Shaughnessy book...and my last.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Gail Cooke HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 29, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Who's got a secret? According to author Perri O`Shaughnessy we all have secrets. And, at times, these are not just ordinary secrets such as, a black sheep in the family, credit card debt, or something like that. These secrets can be so dark and hidden so deeply that we are not even aware of them. Such is the case with architect Ray Jackson, protagonist in O'Shaughnessy's latest thriller Keeper of the Keys.

Ray's wife, Leigh, has disappeared. He doesn't know where and he doesn't know why. Perhaps most importantly, he doesn't even know whether she is alive or dead. It's strange that he doesn't seem too upset about his missing spouse. Yet, Ray is an odd duck who obsesses about an unhappy childhood and the fact that he and his mother had to move frequently. As an adult and an architect he is now building houses like the ones he lived in as a child.

He stays close to his mother, Esme, but she offers very little information about his father or his childhood. She will only say that his father was a difficult man and he deserted them when Ray was two . A dutiful son, Ray goes to her home to have dinner with her once a week, and she frets that he is so persistent about digging into his past.

This issue is forced when Leigh disappears and he is confronted by her friend Kathleen, called Kat, who accuses Ray of having something to do with Leigh's disappearance. When the police enter the picture with probing questions he takes a set of keys that he has had since boyhood and revisits the houses he once lived in. What Ray eventually discovers is not at all what he hoped to find.

Dick Hill, dubbed a Golden Voice by AudioFile magazine and

actress Laural Merlington partner on this narration, which is a twofold treat for listeners. Both are gifted voice performers who did double duty as directors of this audio edition.

Enjoy!

- Gail Cooke
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?