Keeping the Circle: American Indian Identity in Eastern N... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Keeping the Circle: American Indian Identity in Eastern North Carolina, 1885-2004 (Indians of the Southeast) Hardcover – October 1, 2005


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$63.99 $39.89

Our Kids by Robert D. Putnam
Our Kids by Robert D. Putnam
Enjoy Robert Putnam's analysis on why fewer Americans have the opportunity for upward mobility. Learn more | See all by author

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Well written, informative, and important. Part of the University of Nebraska Press’s fine series on ‘Indians of the Southeast’ . . . . Such work has been neglected in larger studies of southern race relations, just as Native Americans have been neglected in narratives of twentieth-century American history.”—American Historical Review
(American Historical Review)

“Oakley’s bonus is a lucid, eloquent discussion of how federal policies and changes in US culture affected the course of Indian history, particularly in North Carolina.”—G. Gagnon, Choice
(Choice)

“Everyone interested in southern or Native American history should pick up this eminently readable book. . . . The book’s accessible prose and straightforward organization make it ideal for use in undergraduate courses. . . . By telling the story of Indians in postbellum North Carolina, Keeping the Circle represents an important step toward a more inclusive narrative of Southern history. Helpfully, Oakley concludes his book with a bibliographic essay for those who wish to further develop this rich, but often ignored, aspect of the region’s past.”—H-Net Book Reviews, H-North Carolina
(H-Net Book Reviews, H-North Carolina 2008-06-09) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Christopher Arris Oakley is an assistant professor of history at East Carolina University.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Indians of the Southeast
  • Hardcover: 196 pages
  • Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (October 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803235747
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803235748
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,171,034 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Christopher Arris Oakley is an Assistant Professor of History at East Carolina University. He specializes in North Carolina History and Native American History. Oakley received his B.A. from the University of North Carolina and his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee. He has published scholarly articles in The North Carolina Historical Review, Mississippi Quarterly, Southern Cultures, Native South, and The Journal of the North Carolina Association of Historians. He has also presented papers at a number of professional conferences, including the Southern History Conference, the Western History Conference, and the Ethnohistory Conference. In 2005, University of Nebraska Press published Oakley's first book, Keeping the Circle: American Indian Identity in Eastern North Carolina 1885-2004, as part of its Indians of the Southeast series. He is currently working on a new book about the Cherokees in the 20th century.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
60%
4 star
0%
3 star
40%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sean Pumphrey on December 27, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Dr. Oakley presents a book that is comphrensive in nature including research and historical accounts of what is passed down orally in the Eastern Band Tribes. Having lived there for only a bit of time, he recounted some of the same stories that I had heard of Henry B. Lowry. I am soon to teach @ UNC-Pembroke and feel this is a must read for anyone inside and outside the Native American culture in Eastern North Carolina and throughout the Carolinas.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this for my North Carolina Indians Class. Before I read this text, I had no knowledge of any Indians in NC besides a vague notion about the Cherokees in the mountains. Needless to say, this was illuminating and I'm very happy that I was able to learn so much about the many different groups of Indians that inhabit North Carolina. Especially enjoyed the legend of Henry Berry Lowry and the "Battle" (or utter beatdown) of Maxton Field
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was really excited to get to read this book, and though is it mostly well written and readability is good, the basics of research have not been held. There are several areas that should have been sourced, or more clearly sourced. A total shame and maybe if there are future editions these errors will be corrected.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an excellent book for anyone searching their geneology for connections to American Indian Nations in North Carolina. It is a well written history book that is interesting to read. I have trouble putting it down and wait anxiously to pick it up again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By mlw on April 29, 2011
Format: Paperback
While Oakley's text is moderately engaging and provides an interesting approach to the identity issue among Indians in the specific topics, the text, in places, is not particularly well researched. The background information contains numerous errors and misleading statements, and the citations are lacking. That is to say, some of the information discussed in the general narrative does not have a proper source. Oakley misses facts that could be easily verified, which makes the rest of the text questionable. The text does not lack value and does offer a very relevant discussion on the topic, but it is important to read it with a critical eye.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again