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Keeping the Faith: Race, Politics, and Social Development in Jacksonville, Florida, 1940-1970 (Contributions in American History) Hardcover – April 30, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0313310355 ISBN-10: 0313310351 Edition: 2nd ptg

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Product Details

  • Series: Contributions in American History (Book 184)
  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Praeger; 2nd ptg edition (April 30, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0313310351
  • ISBN-13: 978-0313310355
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,310,520 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

.,."fills a void in the history of race relations in one of Florida's largest cities before and during the civil rights movement. This volume should be read by those interested in the Civil Rights movement, in Southern and Florida History, and in African American History."-Florida Historical Quarterly

Book Description

Attacks the myth that blacks were passive victims of the southern Jim Crow system and reveals instead that in Jacksonville, Florida, blacks used political and economic pressure to improve their situation and force politicians to make moderate adjustments in the Jim Crow system.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Michael Lewyn VINE VOICE on April 3, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Sometimes dry, sometimes interesting, sometimes shallow, sometimes illuminating.

The first chapter was especially interesting: Bartley points out that Jacksonville was majority African-American as late as 1910, unlike other Florida cities.

I also liked Bartley's discussion of city-county consolidation.

In many cities, African-Americans opposed municipal annexations because such annexations might prevent a city from becoming majority black and thus reduce black political power. But in Jacksonville, most African-Americans supported consolidation (which, in the late 1960s, annexed hundreds of miles of Duval County suburbia to the city of Jacksonville). Why? Because in Jacksonville most municipal elections were at-large citywide elections - which meant that until blacks became a majority they couldn't win a single city council seat. Consolidation supporters gained African-American support by adding district-based elections to the consolidation package. Thus, consolidation actually increased African-American political power by creating several majority-black council districts.

I also liked Bartley's explanation of how city politicians manipulated the black vote during the 1940s and 1950s. After the federal courts barred white-only primaries in the 1940s, Blacks were allowed to vote in Jacksonville. One might think that in those days, blacks were "pariah voters" who were completely ignored by white politicians- but the truth is more complex. In Jacksonville, politicians were able to create biracial coalitions, as long as they did not aggressively challenge segregation.
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By "clevergirl" on February 7, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Keeping the Faith is an excellent read. In the beginning I thought it might be more of a tale of simple history and dates, but the author tells a compelling story that demands your attention and takes you back 50-60 years to Jacksonville, Florida. The history of our nation has never been a simple one but for me this book was clear and uncluttered. If you are an historian or just a lover of books this is a great choice.
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0 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Andy Khoral on May 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I, like many students at the University of Akron, bought this book for my United States History since 1877 class. This was an idiotic move on my part since, as you can see, the price is astronomical and I never had to read it. Whatever you do, do not buy this book. It is completely unnecessary. By the way, I currently have a high A in the class (I just have to take the final) and I never opened a text book or read any of the other books he had us buy. Just pay attention in class, take good notes, and use an encyclopedia to define the I.D.'s when He gives you the review sheet. It's an easy A and you'll save [money].
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